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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
taple, 1. Cornwall, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein. 8. Somersetshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8; Bristol, 3; Taunton-Dean. 1. Wiltshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Salisbury, 7 ; Salisbury, 1. Berkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Reading, 5; Reading. 1. Surrey. with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Southwark, 5; Southwark, 2. Middlesex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; London, 8: Westminster and the Duchy, 2. Hertfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Buckinghamshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Oxfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; Oxford City, 2; Oxford University, 2. Gloucestershire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Glouces
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
1; Colchester, 2; Gloucestershire, 5; Gloucester, 2; Tewkesbury, 1; Cirencester, 1; Herefordshire, 4; Hereford, 1; Leominster, 1; Hertfordshire, 5; St. Alban's, 1; Hertford, 1; Huntingdonshire, 3; Huntingdon, 1; Kent, 11; Canterbury, 2; Rochester, 1; Maidstone, 1 ; Dover, 1; Sandwich, 1; Queenborough, 1; Lancashire, 4; Preston, 1; Lancaster, 1; Liverpool, 1; Manchester, 1; Leicestershire, 4; Leicester, 2; Lincolnshire, 10; Lincoln, 2; Boston, 1; Grantham, 1; Stamford, 1; Great Grimsby, 1; Middlesex, 4; London, 6; Westminster, 2; Monmouthshire, 3; Norfolk, 10; Norwich, 2; Lynn-Regis, 2; Great Yarmouth, 2; Northamptonshire, 6; Peterborough, 1; Northampton, 1; Nottinghamshire, 4; Nottingham, 2; Northumberland, 3; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1; Berwick, 1; Oxfordshire, 5; Oxford City, 1; Oxford University, 1; Woodstock, 1; Rutlandshire, 2; Shropshire, 4; Shrewsbury, 2; Bridgnorth, 1; Ludlow, 1; Staffordshire, 3; Lichfield, 1; Stafford, 1; Newcastle-under-Lyne, 1; Somersetshire, 11; Bristol, 2;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, Sir Brook 1735- (search)
ilitary officer; born in Plymouth, England, Feb. 7, 1735; entered the naval service early in life, but while bathing in the sea at Havana in 1749 a shark bit off his right leg below the knee, and he abandoned the sea and entered upon mercantile business. He was with Colonel Monckton in Nova Scotia in 1755, and was at the siege of Louisburg in 1758, having in charge Wolfe's division, as commissary. In 1759 he settled as a merchant in London, and afterwards in Montreal. Just before the Revolutionary War he visited several of the colonies, with false professions of political friendship for them, as a Whig. A friend of Sir Guy Carleton, he was made his commissary-general in America in 1782, and from 1784 to 1793 he was member of Parliament for London. He was sheriff of London and Middlesex, and in 1796 was lord mayor. For his services in America, Parliament voted his wife an annuity of $2,000 for life. From 1798 to 1806 he was commissary-general of England. He died Oct. 2, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilkes, John 1727-1797 (search)
rn in London, England, Oct. 17, 1727. He became a member of Parliament in 1757. In 1763 he made a severe attack on the govern- John Wilkes. ment in his newspaper (the North Briton, No. 45), for which he was sent to the Tower (see ninety-two and forty-five). On account of a licentious essay on woman, he was afterwards expelled from the House of Commons. After his release from the Tower, he went to Paris, and, returning in 1768, sent a letter of submission to the King, and was soon afterwards elected to Parliament for Middlesex; but his seat was successfully contested and he was elected alderman of London. The same year he obtained a verdict of $20,000 against the secretary of state for seizing his papers. In 1771 he was sheriff of London, and in 1774 lord mayor. In 1779 he was made chamberlain, and soon afterwards retired from political life. Wilkes was always the champion of the colonists, and was regarded as the defender of popular rights. He died in London, Dec. 20, 1797.
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The old South meeting House (1876). (search)
have done it, you remember that the sagacity and the thrift of three hundred thousand men have created that great centre of industry, and there comes to your mind, perhaps sooner than anything else, the old lullaby,--How doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower. It is industry; it is thrift; it is comfort; it is wealth. But on Bunker Hill let somebody point out to you the church-tower whose lantern told Paul Revere that Middlesex was to be invaded. Search till your eye rests on this tiny spire which trembled once when the mock Indian whoop bade England defiance. There is the elm where Washington first drew his sword. Here Winter Hill, whose cannon-ball struck Brattle-Street Church. At your feet the sod is greener for the blood of Warren, which settled it forever that no more laws were to be made for us in London. The thrill you feel is that sentiment which, in 1862, made twenty million men, who had wrangled f
March ye 17th 1687-8. Mass. Arch., CXXVIII. 111, 112. Subsequently, another order of notice was issued:— Boston 22d June 1688. Mr. Sheriff, You may give notice to any persons that lay claim to the land in Cambridge petitioned for by Edward Randolph Esq., that on Thursday next, in the forenoon, they appear before his Excellency in Council, and give their full answer therein. I am, sir, your servant, John West, D. Sec. Superscribed, To Samuell Gookin Esq. High Sheriff of Middlesex, at Cambridge. Ibid., p. 281. At the time appointed, the proprietors of the lands in controversy presented their case more fully:— The Reply of the proprietors of those lands lying between Sanders Brook and Spy Pond near unto Watertown, in the County of Middlesex, to an answer made to their address presented to your Excellency and the honorable Council, referring to the petition of Edward Randolph Esq., he praying a grant of seven hundred acres, part of the abovesaid tract of l
d one of the Reserve Commissioners of the United Colonies. He was appointed in 1637 Captain of the first train-band in Camb.; became a member of the Artillery Co. in 1638, and its Captain in 1643; and when a similar company was incorporated in Middlesex, 14 May 1645, he was placed at the head of it. He was one of the Commissioners and Commander-in-chief of the expedition sent to Rhode Island, in 1643, to apprehend Samuel Gorton and his company. He returned to England about the end of 1645, be and her family, they being under the afflicting hand of God; her sons were taken away by death, and her daughter, and a grandchild. The male line seems to have become extinct. Estabrook, Joseph, according to Savage came from Enfield in Middlesex, England, about 1660. He grad. H. C. 1664, and was ordained at Concord, where he continued in the ministry during life. He m. Mary, dau. of Capt. Hugh Mason, and had Joseph, b. 6 May 1669; Benjamin, b. 24 Feb. 1670-71; Mary, b. 28 Oct 1672; Samue
38, 1642, 1643; Deputy or Representative, 1636, 1642-1645, five years, and Speaker of the House in 1645. While a member of the House he was frequently placed on important committees, especially in relation to military affairs. In 1645 he was elected one of the Reserve Commissioners of the United Colonies. He was appointed in 1637 Captain of the first train-band in Camb.; became a member of the Artillery Co. in 1638, and its Captain in 1643; and when a similar company was incorporated in Middlesex, 14 May 1645, he was placed at the head of it. He was one of the Commissioners and Commander-in-chief of the expedition sent to Rhode Island, in 1643, to apprehend Samuel Gorton and his company. He returned to England about the end of 1645, became a Colonel in Cromwell's army, and was reported to be slain in the wars in Ireland, in the year 1652. (Mid. Court Files.) By his w. Alice he had, in Camb., Elizabeth, b. 27 Mar. 1640, d. July 1640; Thomas, b. 19 June 1642, d. 16 July 1642; Eliza
d much affliction in her old age. Frequent donations were made to her by the Church between 1686 and 1697, and for a much longer period to her daughters Gibson and Lewis, both widows. Especially, in 1689, there was a contribution for widow Arrington and her family, they being under the afflicting hand of God; her sons were taken away by death, and her daughter, and a grandchild. The male line seems to have become extinct. Estabrook, Joseph, according to Savage came from Enfield in Middlesex, England, about 1660. He grad. H. C. 1664, and was ordained at Concord, where he continued in the ministry during life. He m. Mary, dau. of Capt. Hugh Mason, and had Joseph, b. 6 May 1669; Benjamin, b. 24 Feb. 1670-71; Mary, b. 28 Oct 1672; Samuel, b. 7 June 1674, grad. H. C. 1696, ordained at Canterbury, Conn., 13 June 1711 (Trumbull), and d. 26 June 1727; Daniel, b. 14 Feb. 1675-6; Ann, b. 30 Dec. 1677. Such are the dates of Births, on the County Records. Savage has some of them differe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
in 1611, and Dr. John Pott in 1624. Contributions to the Annals of Medical Progress in the United States, Joseph M. Toner, M. D., Washington, 1874. The last was Governor of the colony in 1628. There was no deficiency onward of such ministrants. I find Chirurgeon John Brock, with others, in 1640, and a little later Drs. Daniel Parke, Robert Ellison, Francis Haddon, and Patrick Napier, in York county. Dr. John Mitchell, F. R. S., eminent, as a botanist as well as physician, located in Middlesex in 1700. Another alike doubly distinguished in science was John Clayton, son of the Attorney-General of the same name, and who settled in Gloucester in 1706. John Tennent, Sr. and Jr., of Spotsylvania, the former of whom made valuable contributions to medical literature. Dr. William Cabell, who had been a surgeon in the British navy, and was the founder of the distinguished family of his name. Dr. John Baynham, of Caroline, and Dr. William Baynham, of Essex county. The heroic G
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