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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
ers from the brigade to go to Petersburg. Colonel Rion stepped out and said: The whole battalion will go. He directed me to put the eight companies, comprising some 500 men, on the train. It was close packing, standing and sitting, inside and outside, on engine, tender and cars. I was on top taking in the scenery and the pine smoke from the engine. I was a dirty white man before we started, but by the time we arrived in Petersburg I was black. Right across Pocahontas Bridge and up the Main street we marched, my blackness illuming and leading the way. It was just after Wise's brigade had given way. They were running back, some hatless, some shoeless, and nearly all without guns. The women of Petersburg were out on the sidewalks, carrying their household goods from place to place. What brigade is that? they asked. Hagood's brigade, I proudly answered. We are safe now, said they, as they went down on their knees on the pavements. Hagood's brigade had saved them twice r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
delphia; R. Barton Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, Gustavus A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, John A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John Minor Botts, Thomas W. Doswell, James Thomas, Jr., and Thomas R. Price, of Virginia. When the bond was duly executed the marshal was directed to discharge the prisoner, which was done amid deafening applause. The streets around the Custom House were crowded with people awaiting the result. As soon as the decision was announced some one ran to the Main-street window of the Custom House and shouted: The President is bailed! A mighty roar of applause went up from the people below, which was taken up and echoed and re-echoed from street to street and house to house, though, strange to say, a considerable period of time elapsed before the crowd on Bank street were informed of the result; then they joined most heartily in the shouts. A company of United States infantry had been brought up to the door of the Custom House when Mr. Davis was carr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
delphia; R. Barton Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, Gustavus A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, John A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John Minor Botts, Thomas W. Doswell, James Thomas, Jr., and Thomas R. Price, of Virginia. When the bond was duly executed the marshal was directed to discharge the prisoner, which was done amid deafening applause. The streets around the Custom House were crowded with people awaiting the result. As soon as the decision was announced some one ran to the Main-street window of the Custom House and shouted: The President is bailed! A mighty roar of applause went up from the people below, which was taken up and echoed and re-echoed from street to street and house to house, though, strange to say, a considerable period of time elapsed before the crowd on Bank street were informed of the result; then they joined most heartily in the shouts. A company of United States infantry had been brought up to the door of the Custom House when Mr. Davis was carr
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1., The Medford blacksmith of 1775. (search)
. one of the early settlers in Medford, about 1770, was Harry Bond, who came here from Londonderry, New Hampshire, to follow the occupation of a blacksmith. He was the grandson of John Bond, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, who took an active part in the siege of Londonderry, 1689. Harry was tall, robust, and of large frame, a characteristic of the people of the North of Ireland, from whom he was descended. At the time of which we write there stood at the corner of the Medford turnpike and Main street, a blacksmith shop, a plain and unpretentious structure, whose weather-beaten look denoted it had been built many years. A venerable oak-tree standing in front of the shop, with its overhanging branches, gave cooling shadows in the summer days. The wide and open door gave a view of the interior. On one side could be seen a massive framework, into which oxen were driven and secured in a sling while being shod. This operation was a curiosity to passersby, especially to the childr
ains were hauled by horses to the locomotives waiting just below Causeway street and also inwardly. Another report throws a little light on the manner of operating the branch:— January 3, 1854, Saugus and Medford train coming in at 2.20 P. M., Baggage Master Caleb Eames, Jr., of Saugus, killed near freight house owing to misplaced switch. This record indicates that some Medford Branch trains were attached to other inward trains at Medford Junction and the combined train taken over the Main line to Boston by one engine. A similar arrangement obtained on other roads. Such would have left the Medford engine free to return with cars brought to the junction by another outward train, and better accommodated the time schedule. Report of another accident was nearer home:— September 4, 1857, Mrs. Dexter Loud of Abington was fatally injured at Park street station. It was not known whether she stepped from the car on to the track; her dress caught on the step of the engine and s
Attempted Burglary. --On Wednesday night one or more chevaliers de industrie applied themselves assiduously for several hours to an unsuccessful attempt to effect a felonious entrance into the grocery establishment of Mr. Peter Cunningham, located below Col. Haskins', on the Main street, at Rocketts. Yesterday morning at an early hour, when the proprietor proceeded to open for the day, he found that the rogues had bored continuously with an auger till they had made a hole about five inches square, through which they vainly endeavored to remove the only bar to their entrance — a stout wooden stuncheon, made, however, too fast for purposes of easy access by means of a chain. It is perhaps a fortunate thing for Cunningham that his fastening was a cross bar to such sinister designs as evidently prevailed in the vicinity of his front door on the night in question. This is the fourth attempt that has been made to rob the same store. Have we burglars among us?
Good swimmer. --On Saturday evening, a lad named Richard Cock fell or jumped into Shockoe creek above the arch crossing Union street, and before he was rescued passed under the arch named, as also the Main and Cary street arches, emerging on the south side of the last-named unharmed but "considerably wet all over." Master Cock is a good swimmer.
hen, or where, I am unable to tell. But certain it is, that the announcement that he was coming to Old Point has greatly raised the spirit of our troops. It is hoped that he may feel himself called upon to retrieve the fallen fortunes of his section, by setting a few squadrons on our shores Should he do so, look out for Manassas No. 2 I regret to announce the burning of the town of Hampton, located about 2½ miles from Fortress Monroe. It was a snug, cozy, homelike looking village; the Main street, in summer, presenting the appearance of a long arbour, from the dense foliage which lined the sides and met over-head along the entire avenue. Nothing but stern necessity would have led to its destruction on the part of our Generals. If, on the other hand, its destruction has been the wanton act of the Northern vandals, the cry for instant and fearful retaliation will go up from all Eastern Virginia, and our commanders should teach them one lesson on this score which they would neve
le to find lodgings in the hotels or even a shelter to cover their heads. Last night, several members of Hampton's Legion arrived in the city at a late hour, and were unable to proceed further without a pass from the Provost Marabel, which could not be obtained until morning. For several hours they went from house to house in search of a bed, but failed to find one, and were forced at last to wonder through the weary hours of night, or else couch themselves upon the pavement. This is but one example of a thousand of daily occurrence. Every night one sees soldiers stretched out at every corner, while the stone front, and even the steps of the larger hotels are crowded with them. It seems strange that those who have so nobly volunteered to fight the battles of our country should be thus neglected, when proper bar racks could be fired up at so little coat. If any eight will touch the heart of the it is that which meets his eye in a mid-night walk down the Main street of our city.
ted against the Stonewall brigade, took French leave and came into the Confederate lines. He states that on Friday night, 20th May, the guard over the magazine in Fredericksburg was killed, and the magazine blown up, destroying an immense amount of ammunition, and damaging many buildings in the vicinity. Several citizens were arrested, charged with the act, but up to the time he left no evidence had been obtained as to their guilt. The Yankees have stretched a Union flag across the Main street of the town, but the citizens refuse to pass under it. To show their contempt for it, they will frequently go up to it, and then with the most contemptuous movements turn back, and go around the square. In all other respects it is said the citizens show their utter loathing for the Federals, and leave no opportunity unimproved of making it as plain to them as possible. The ladies are especially violent in their insulting conduct, and frequent threats of punishing them are made by the
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