hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 58 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Mention made of one Hardine of England one of the chiefest personages, and a leader among other of two hundred saile of ships of Christians that landed at Joppa in the yeere of our Lord God 1102. (search)
, and a leader among other of two hundred saile of ships of Christians that landed at Joppa in the yeere of our Lord God 1102. WHILE the Sarazens continued their siege against Joppa , two hundred saile of Christian ships arrived at Joppa , that they might performe their devotions at Hierusalem. The chiefe men and leaders of these Christians are reported to have bene: Bernard Witrazh of the land of Galatia , Hardine of England, Otho of Roges, Haderwerck one of the chiefe noble men of Westphalia , &c. This Christian power through Gods speciall provision, arrived here for the succour and reliefe of the distressed & besieged Christians in Joppa , the third day of July, 1102. and in the second yeere of Baldwine king of Jerusalem. Whereupon the multitude of the Sarazens, seeing that the Christian power joyned themselves boldly, close by them even face to face in a lodging hard by them, the very next night at midnight, remooved their tents, and pitched them more then a mile off, that t
than a day. Our train was a very long one, of over eighty cars, and though drawn by three locomotives, its progress to Cologne was very slow and the journey most tedious. From Cologne we continued on by rail up the valley of the Rhine to Bingebruck, near Bingen, and thence across through Saarbrfiken to Remilly, where we left the railway and rode in a hay-wagon to Pont-a-Mousson, arriving there August 17, late in the afternoon. This little city had been ceded to France at the Peace of Westphalia, and although originally German, the people had become, in the lapse of so many years, intensely French in sentiment. The town was so full of officers and men belonging to the German army that it was difficult to get lodgings, but after some delay we found quite comfortable quarters at one of the small hotels, and presently, after we had succeeded in getting a slender meal, I sent my card to Count von Bismarck, the Chancellor of the North German Confederation, who soon responded by appoin
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
appen that one of the armies, at the commencement of the campaign, occupies a single one of those faces, as it is possible that it may hold two of them, whilst the enemy should occupy but one only, and that the fourth should form an insurmountable obstacle. The manner in which this theatre of war would be embraced, would present then very different combinations in each of those hypotheses. In order better to make this comprehended, I will cite the theatre of war of the French armies in Westphalia, from 1757 to 1762, and that of Napoleon in 1806. (See Fig. 1.) Figure I. In the first of these theatres of war, the side Ab was formed by the North Sea, the side Bd by the line of the Weser, base of the army of the Duke Ferdinand; the line of the Main formed the side Cd, base of the French army, and the face Ac was formed by the line of the Rhine, equally guarded by the armies of Louis XV. It is seen, then, that the French armies, operating offensively, and holding two faces,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nordhoff, Charles 1830- (search)
Nordhoff, Charles 1830- Author and journalist; born in Westphalia, Prussia, Aug. 31, 1830; came with his parents to the United States in 1835; received a common school education in Cincinnati, and was apprenticed to a printer, but soon afterwards shipped in the navy, and made a voyage around the world. He remained on the sea—in the naval, merchant, and whaling service—about eleven years, when he found employment, first in a newspaper office in Philadelphia, and afterwards in Indianapolis. From 1857 to 1861 he was in the editorial employment of Harper & Brothers, and from 1861 to 1871 was connected with the New York Evening post, and from 1872-87 was editor of the Herald, New York. He afterwards visited California and the Sandwich Islands, and published several books, including Man-ofWar life; The merchant vessel; Whaling and fishing; Secession is rebellion; Freedom of the South Carolina Islands; The cotton States; California for health, pleasure, and residence; Oregon and the S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ostend manifesto. (search)
Soule was instructed and clothed with full power to negotiate for the purchase of the island. In August the Secretary suggested to Minister Buchanan in London, Minister Mason at Paris, and Minister Soule at Madrid the propriety of holding a conference for the purpose of adopting measures for a concert of action in aid of negotiations with Spain. They accordingly met at Ostend, a seaport town in Belgium, Oct. 9, 1854. After a session of three days they adjourned to Aix-la-Chapelle, in Rhenish Prussia, and thence they addressed a letter, Oct. 18, to the United States government embodying their views. In it they suggested that an earnest effort to purchase Cuba ought to be immediately made at a price not to exceed $120,000,000, and that the proposal should be laid before the Spanish Cortes about to assemble. They set forth the great advantage that such a transfer of political jurisdiction would be to all parties concerned; that the oppression of the Spanish authorities in Cuba would
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaty of Aix-la-chapelle, (search)
Treaty of Aix-la-chapelle, A treaty between Great Britain, France, Holland, Germany, Spain, and Greece; signed by the representatives of these respective powers on Oct. 18 (N. S.), 1748. By it the treaties of Westphalia (1648), of Nimeguen (1678-79), of Ryswick (1697), of Utrecht (1713), of Baden (1714), of the Triple Alliance (1717), of the Quadruple Alliance (1718), and of Vienna (1738), were renewed and confirmed. It was fondly hoped this treaty would insure a permanent peace for Europe. It was, however, only a truce between France and England, contending for dominion in America. The English regarded as encroachments the erection by the French of about twenty forts, besides block-houses and tradingposts, within claimed English domain. So while Acadia (q. v.) furnished one field for hostilities between the two nations, the country along the lakes and in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys furnished another.
to drive a piston in a cylinder, the power being intended to work a pump. The distance, the friction, and the leakage were too much for the Doctor, and the inversion of the process, making the primary engine exhaust instead of condensing, had no better effect. Thinking that it was the volume of air in the pipe which made the second cylinder unresponsive to the action of the primary cylinder, be reduced the size of the pipe, but still the pumping-machine would not move. In Auvergne and Westphalia the project was tried on an extensive scale, attempts being made to drain mines by these means. About one hundered years after the experiment of the philosopher of Blois, a Welsh engineer used the power derived from a heavy fall of water to work a blowing-cylinder from which air was conveyed to a blast-furnace a distance of a mile and a half. The resulting blast was feeble. Some forty years since, a Mr. Hague took out an English patent for the application of compressed air to workin
ing a disagreeable flavor to the meat. In some cases the twigs or branches of aromatic plants are added to the fuel; juniper is used for smoking the celebrated Westphalia hams. Corn-cobs are frequently used. Exclusion of air. In 1808, M. Appert invented a process for preserving provisions by parboiling, and inclosing them in ory furnace, and the process is stopped on the instant that the carbon has been sufficiently eliminated. Reported to have been first made by Anton Lohage, of Westphalia. In 1848, he began his trials at the Haspe Iron Works, near Hagen, in Westphalia, and after some time he succeeded in producing steel of good and uniform qualiWestphalia, and after some time he succeeded in producing steel of good and uniform quality by the ordinary puddling process. His invention was patented 1850, in England, by Ewald Riepe, and introduced at Low Moor; but, owing to the quality of the pig-iron, its use was very limited in England until, in 1858, Mr. William Clay introduced the process on a large scale at the Mersey Steel and Iron Works, Liverpool. In Ge
k. These two rails had, during the period of little more than three years, been exposed to the traffic of 9,550,000 engines, trucks, and carriages, and 95,577,240 tons. It is an amount of traffic equal to nearly ten times that which destroyed the Great Northern rails in three years. The result of this trial was to induce the London and Northwestern to enter very extensively into the employment of steel rails. Railway rails are made of puddled steel at the Hoerder Iron and Steel Works, Westphalia. The process consists in bringing a number of balls together to a heavy hammer (say a 12-ton steamham-mer), which welds them together into a homogeneous bloom. The faces of the hammer and anvil are hollow, so as to keep the metal together, and the bloom is sent at the same heat to the rolls. A number of puddled steel balls are welded into one, in a furnace, as a single puddled ball is not large enough to make a rail. Weight. The tendency to increase the stability of the track by in
eet; length to breadth, 6.38. b, Peruvian, Allan line. Length, 270 feet; beam, 38 feet; length to breadth, 7.11. c, Moravian, Allan line. Length, 290 feet; beam, 39 feet; length to breadth, 7.44. d, Leipzig, N. G. Lloyd's line. Length, 290 feet; beam, 39 feet; length to breadth, 7.44. e, Minnesota, Williams & Guion line. Length, 332 feet; beam, 42 feet; length to breadth, 7.90. f, Rhein, N. G. Lloyd's line. Length, 332 feet; beam, 40 feet; length to breadth, 8.30. g, Westphalia, Hamburgh line. Length, 340 feet; beam, 40 feet; length to breadth, 8.50. h, Pennsylvania, American S. S. Co. Length, 343 feet; beam, 43 feet; length to breadth, 7.91. i, Russia, Cunard line. Length, 358 feet; beam, 43 feet; length to breadth, 8.33. j, Queen, National line. Length, 358 feet; beam, 41 feet; length to breadth, 8.73. k, Ville du Havre, French line. Length, 423 feet; beam, 49 feet; length to breadth, 8.63. l, City of Montreal, Inman line. Length, 433 feet;
1 2 3