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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. You can also browse the collection for Westphalia (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) or search for Westphalia (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) in all documents.

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than Chap. III.} 1776. those of the United States, were endangered; and the political question of the day assumed the largest proportions. In the event of the death of the childless elector of Bavaria, Joseph of Austria was prepared, under the false pretext of a right of inheritance, to appropriate a large part of that electorate. To prevent so fatal a measure, the king of Prussia, in the last months of 1776, began to draw near to France, which was one of the guarantees of the peace of Westphalia. Frederic to Goltz, 14 Nov., 1776. His desire for a good understanding with that power Ibid., 9 Dec., 1776. was cordially reciprocated by Vergennes. Goltz to Frederic, 22 Dec., 1776. On the advent of the rupture between France and England, he announced that England should receive no aid from Prussia; and Vergennes on his side gave the hint that France, if it should become involved in the conflict, would confine itself to a maritime war. Goltz to Frederic, 26 Dec., 1776.
and; I offer my vows for the success of the French; Ibid., 27 Feb., 1778. and he added in his own hand: The Austrians wish openly to subjugate the empire, abolish the constitutions, tyrannize the liberty of voices, and establish their own absolute and unlimited power on the ruins of the ancient government. Let him who will, bear such violences: I shall oppose them till death closes my eyes. Frederic to Goltz, 27 Feb., 1778. Since France would not fulfil her guarantee of the peace of Westphalia, Frederic desired at least a formal and positive assurance of her neutrality. As to the French ministers, said he, I admire their apathy; but if I were to imitate it, I should surely be lost. Ibid., 22 March, 1778. The queen of France besought her husband even with tears to favor the designs of the court of Vienna, and bitterly complained that neutrality had been promised by his cabinet; but the king turned aside her entreaties, remarking that these affairs ought never to become the su