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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, Germany and its Tribes (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb). You can also browse the collection for Danube or search for Danube in all documents.

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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), BOOK III, chapter 46 (search)
this war, its origin and its issue, for it lasted long, I shall hereafter speak. The Dacians also were in motion, a people which never can be trusted, and which, now that our legions were withdrawn from Mœsia, had nothing to fear. They quietly watched the opening of the campaign, but when they heard that Italy was in a blaze of war, and that the whole Empire was divided against itself, they stormed the winter quarters of the auxiliary infantry and cavalry, and occupied both banks of the Danube. They were then preparing to destroy the camp of the legions, but Mucianus sent the 6th legion against them, for he knew of the victory of Cremona, and he feared this double pressure of barbarian power with Dacians and Germans invading Italy from opposite sides. We were helped, as often before, by the good fortune of the Roman people, which brought to the spot Mucianus with the armies of the East, and by the decisive settlement which in the meantime was effected at Cremona. Fonteius A