Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Montreal (Canada) or search for Montreal (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 184 results in 116 document sections:

... 7 8 9 10 11 12
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William's War, King (search)
was felt in America. Through these Jesuits, the Indians were made allies of the French and the two races were frequently found on the war-path few months later Frontenac, governor of Canada, sent a party of 300 French and Indian warriors from Montreal to penetrate the country towards Albany. On a gloomy night in the winter (Feb. 18, 1690), when the snow lay 20 inches deep in the Mohawk Valley, they fell upon the frontier town of Schenectady (q. v.), massacred many of the people, and burned tthe colonies of New England and New York joined in efforts to conquer Canada. A land and naval expedition was arranged, the former commanded by a son of Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut, to go from New York by way of Lake Champlain to attack Montreal; and the latter, fitted out by Massachusetts alone, and commanded by Sir William Phipps, to attack Quebec. Phipps's armament consisted of thirty-four vessels and 2,000 men. The expenses of the land expedition were borne jointly by Connecticut a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Eleazar -1795 (search)
ds the fate of the eldest son of Louis XVI. of France and Marie Antoinette, who was eight years of age at the time his father was murdered by the Jacobins. After the downfall of Robespierre and his fellows, it was declared that the prince died in prison in Eleazar Williams. 1795, while the royalists believed he had been secretly hidden away in the United States. Curious facts and circumstances pointed to Rev. Eleazar Williams, a reputed half-breed Indian, of the Caughnawaga tribe, near Montreal, as the surviving prince, who, for almost sixty years, had been hidden from the world in that disguise. He was a reputed son of Thomas Williams, son of Eunice, the captive daughter of Rev. John Williams, of Deerfield, Mass. He was educated at Long Meadow, Mass., and when the war with England broke out, in 1812, he became confidential agent of the government among the Indians in northern New York. He served in several engagements, and was severely wounded at Plattsburg in 1814. Joining th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, John 1664-1729 (search)
March 1, 1704, and among the inhabitants carried into captivity were Mr. Williams and a part of his family. Two of his children and a black servant were murdered at his door. With his wife and five children he began the toilsome journey towards Canada through the deep snow. On the second day his wife, weak from the effects of recent childbirth, fainted with fatigue, when the tomahawk of her captor cleaved her skull, and so he was relieved of the burden. Her husband and children were taken to Canada, and, after a captivity of nearly two years among the Caughnawaga Indians near Montreal, they were ransomed and returned home, excepting a daughter Eunice (q. v.), whom the Indians refused to part with. After the return of Mr. Williams to Deerfield in 1706 he resumed the charge of his congregation. He married a daughter of Captain Allen, of Connecticut, and in 1711 was appointed a commissary under Colonel Stoddard in the expedition against Canada. He died in Deerfield, June 12, 1729.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woodhull, Nathaniel 1722-1776 (search)
astic, Suffolk co., Long Island, N. Y., Dec. 30, 1722; served in the French and Indian War, and was colonel of a New York regiment under Amherst. In 1769 he was in the New York Assembly, and was one of the few in that body who resisted the obnoxious measures of the British Parliament. In 1776 he was president of the New York Provincial Congress. On the landing of the British on Long Island, he put himself at the head of the militia, with whom he fought in the battle of Long Island. A few days afterwards he was surprised by a party of British light-horsemen, near Jamaica, and, after surrendering his The House in which Woodhull died. sword, he was cruelly cut with the weapons of his captors, of which wounds he died at an ancient stone-house at New Utrecht, Long Island, Sept. 10, 1776. A narrative of his capture and death was published by Henry Onderdonk, Jr., in 1848. His own Journal of the Montreal expedition in 1760 was published in the Historical magazine in September, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wrecks. (search)
ly 27, 1852 Boiler of steamer Reindeer in the Hudson explodes; thirty-eight lives lost, twenty injured......Sept. 4, 1852 Steamer Reindeer bursts a flue at Cannelton, Ind., Ohio River; fifty killed or injured......March 14, 1854 Steamer Montreal, from Quebec to Montreal, burned; nearly 250 lives lost, mostly emigrants......June 26, 1857 Steamer Missouri explodes her boilers on the Ohio; 100 lives lost......Jan. 30, 1866 Steamer Magnolia explodes her boilers on the Ohio River; eighMontreal, burned; nearly 250 lives lost, mostly emigrants......June 26, 1857 Steamer Missouri explodes her boilers on the Ohio; 100 lives lost......Jan. 30, 1866 Steamer Magnolia explodes her boilers on the Ohio River; eighty lives lost......March 18, 1868 Steamers United States and America collide in the Ohio River near Warsaw and burn; great loss of life......Dec. 4, 1868 Steamer Wawasset burned in the Potomac River; seventy-five lives lost......Aug. 8, 1873 Steamer Pat Rogers burned on the Ohio; fifty lives lost......July 26, 1874 Steam-yacht Mamie cut in two by steamer Garland on the Detroit River; sixteen lives lost......July 22, 1880 Steamer Victoria capsized on Thames River, Canada; 200 drow
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Young men's Christian associations, (search)
manding a profession of Christianity in their active, and good moral character in their associate members, and working by methods in harmony with Christianity for the physical, social, mental, and spiritual improvement of their members, and of young men in general. An organization called Young Men's Christian Association was first formed in London, England, by George Williams, in 1841. The movement extended to the United States and Canada in December, 1851, when societies were formed at Montreal, and Boston, Mass. About twenty-four associations were added during the next two years, and during the next ten years the number reached 200. At the first convention, held in Buffalo, N. Y., June 7, 1854, a confederation was formed, with a central committee, and a yearly convention. This form of affiliation continued till the time of the Civil War. During the war the United States Christian Commission of the North formed in New York, in November, 1861, sent 5,000 Christian helpers to the
... 7 8 9 10 11 12