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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 2: from New Mexico to Manassas. (search)
Chapter 2: from New Mexico to Manassas. The war-cloud the journey northward appointed Brigadier-General report to General Beauregard assigned to command at the scene of the first conflict Personnel of the confronting forces Description of the field of Manassas, or Bull Run Beauregard and McDowell of the same West point class battle of Blackburn's Ford Early's mistake under fire of friend and foe. I was stationed at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as paymaster in the United States army when the war-cloud appeared in the East. Officers of the Northern and Southern States were anxious to see the portending storm pass by or disperse, and on many occasions we, too, were assured, by those who claimed to look into the future, that the statesman would yet show himself equal to the occasion, and restore confidence among the people. Our mails were due semi-monthly, but during winter seasons we were glad to have them once a month, and occasionally had to be content with once
els, were prevalent in Washington to-day, but they were not generally credited. A battle took place, to-day, about seven miles from Fort Craig, near Valverde, Valverde is a small village, situated on the left bank of the Rio del Norte, or Rio Grande, near the border of New Mexico and Arizona. Fort Craig is ten miles north of this point, on the same river. Col. Kit Carson, who is said to have done good service with his regiment, deployed as skirmishers, has had his headquarters at Albuquerque for some time, and appears to have arrived at the scene of conflict at a mast opportune time. on the Rio Grande, New Mexico, between the rebel forces under Col. Steele, and the National forces commanded by Col. Canby. The battle lasted from nine o'clock in the morning till sundown, and resulted in the defeat of the National troops, who were obliged to retreat to the Fort. McRae's battery of six pieces was captured by the rebels, after a gallant defence in which Capt. McRae was killed.--
however, gave notice of these facts to Bowling Green, and stopped the upward train. Among the captured Nationals were Majors Helveti and Coffee, both of Wolford's cavalry, and one other Federal officer and three or four soldiers. The rebels burned all the cars except two, and the locomotive.--Louisville Journal, May 12. The rebel iron-clad steamer Merrimac (Virginia) was blown up by order of her commander at her anchorage off Craney Island, Va.--(Doc. 12.) A letter from Albuquerque, New Mexico, of this date, says: The Texans have continued their retreat to El Paso, and will leave the country entirely. They were greatly demoralized, broken up in bands, and devastating the country, and threatening to kill their General, Sibley, who, they say, deceived them by informing them that it was only necessary to march into the country, which was anxious to receive them, and all they had to do was to drive out the Federal officers, and that they would live and possess the country in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
bury the dead and give needed rest to his men, Sibley moved up the river to Albuquerque, leaving his sick and wounded at Socorro. Sibley found, upon his arrival at Albuquerque, that Captain Herbert M. Enos, assistant-quartermaster, U. S. A., who was in command there, had destroyed the larger part of the Government stores at th force consisting of 860 regulars and 350 volunteers, and arrived at or near Albuquerque on the afternoon of the 8th. His intention was to effect a junction with the Fort Union troops. He made a feint of attack on Albuquerque by sending in Paddy Graydon's company, supported by a few regular cavalry under Major Duncan. The Con from that post. When news was received at Santa Fe that Canby had attacked Albuquerque, Colonel Scurry with his entire force started for that town. General Siblby would allow him to do so. On the morning of April 12th, the evacuation of Albuquerque commenced by the crossing to the west side of the river of Scurry's and Stee
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Canby's services in the New Mexican campaign. (search)
face the Texans in the open field, and the results fully confirmed his judgment on that point. But the adobe villages could be quickly loop-holed and converted into admirable defenses for raw troops. By placing the New Mexicans in these improvised fortresses, and using the regulars and Colorado volunteers aggressively in the open parts of the line, the efficiency of his force would have been doubled. Should the enemy refuse to attack us in any of these strong positions until he passed Albuquerque, Canby could then form a junction with the reinforcements at Fort Union, and Sibley's fate would have been sealed. The late Major H. R. Selden, who was present at the meeting, is the w riter's authority for this outline of Canby's intended plan of campaign. This plan was marred at the very outset by the impetuosity of that rash old fighter, Lieutenant-Colonel B. S. Roberts, who, at Valverde, January 21st, precipitated a decisive engagement with the enemy, where the latter had the advant
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ut, found an opportunity to warn Captain Hatch, the commander at Albuquerque, and Captain Morris, who held Fort Craig (both on the Rio Grandee fort. He was ordered to evacuate it, and march his command to Albuquerque. Strange to say, the soldiers were allowed to fill their canteeice. The prisoners were paroled, and then permitted to go on to Albuquerque. Their sufferings from thirst on that march were terrible; someocorro, thirty miles above Fort Craig, Sibley pressed forward to Albuquerque, fifty miles farther, which was at once surrendered. His destint a month had not elapsed before he was compelled to fly back to Albuquerque, which he had made his depot of supplies, for these were threateo satisfied that he could not hold New Mexico, that he evacuated Albuquerque on the 12th of April, 1862. leaving his sick and wounded in hos supplies to meet him. He then made his way to Fort Bliss, At Albuquerque, according to Sibley's report, the brothers Raphael and Manuel A
des of the river from its head-spring to near the Pass del Norte — that is to say, half way down the river. This department is studded with towns and villages — is populated, well cultivated, and covered with flocks and herds. On its left bank (for I only speak of the part which we propose to reannex) is, first, the frontier village Taos, 3,000 souls, and where the custom-house is kept at which the Missouri caravans enter their goods. Then comes Santa Fe, the capital, 4,000 souls; then Albuquerque, 6,000 souls; then some scores of other towns and villages — all more or less populated and surrounded by flocks and fields. Then come the departments of Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas, without settlements on the left bank of the river, but occupying the right bank, and commanding the left. All this — being parts of four Mexican departments, now under Mexican Governors and Governments — is permanently reannexed to this Union, if this treaty is ratified, and is actually reannexed
t found opportunity to give notice to Capt. Hatch, commanding at Albuquerque, to Capt. Morris, who held Fort Craig, and other loyal officers,n their good-will. Their sufferings, on that forlorn march to Albuquerque and Fort Wise, wee protracted and terrible; some becoming derang their wounded at Socorro, 30 miles on the way, they advanced to Albuquerque, 50 miles further, which fell without resistance, and where theievacuate his hard-won conquest, and retreat by forced marches to Albuquerque, his depot, which Canby, advancing from Fort Craig, was seriouslmeet him, leaving his sick and wounded in hospitals at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, to fare as they might. He naively reports that suManuel Armijo--wealthy native merchants — who, on his arrival at Albuquerque, had boldly avowed their sympathy with the Confederate cause, anrth of goods at his disposal. He states that, when he evacuated Albuquerque, they abandoned luxurious homes to identify their fixture fortun
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 (search)
th sides of the river from its headspring to near the Paso del Norte — that is to say, half down the river. This department is studded with towns and villages — is populated — well cultivated and covered with flocks and herds. On its left bank (for I only speak of the part which we propose to reannex) is, first, the frontier village Taos, 3,000 souls, and where the custom-house is kept at which the Missouri caravans enter their goods. Then comes Santa Fe, the capital, 4,000 souls; then Albuquerque, 6,000 souls; then some scores of other towns and villages, all more or less populated, and surrounded by flocks and fields. Then come the departments of Chihuahua. Coahuila, and Tamaulipas, without settlements on the left bank of the river, but occupying the right bank, and commanding the left. All this — being parts of four Mexican departments — now under Mexican governors and governments, is permanently reannexed to this Union, if this treaty is ratified; and is actually reannex
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Mexico, (search)
n of these troops by their propositions, they were compelled to flee from their wrath in July, 1861. At Fort Fillmore, near the Texas border, they found the officers in sympathy with them. Maj. Isaac Lynde, of Vermont, their commander, professed to be loyal, but in July, while leading about 500 of his troops towards the village of Mesilla, he fell in with a few Texan Confederates, and, after a light skirmish, fell back to the fort. He was ordered by his superiors to take his command to Albuquerque. His soldiers were allowed to drink whiskey freely on the way, and when they had gone 10 miles on the road a large portion of them were intoxicated. Then, as if by previous arrangement, a large force of Texans appeared. The sober soldiers wanted to fight, but Lynde, either treacherously or through cowardice, ordered them to surrender. His commissary, Captain Plummer, handed over to the leader of the Confederates $17,000 in government drafts. Thus, at one sweep, nearly one-half of the
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