hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 95 95 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 67 57 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 47 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 27 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) or search for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

peake hospital, Hampton, Virginia Mansion house hospital, Alexandria, Virginia U. S. Marine hospital, Evansville, Indiana Churchesrch, episcopal Private residences used as hospitals, Alexandria, Virginia. Prince street, West of Columbus, capacity 95 Corcing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedycing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions After Antietam—army surgeons, huts,e at first bestowed by the soldiers on this particular Camp at Alexandria, Va. At first it consisted only of tents, and was badly managed; bun an important factor in their success. Soldiers' rest, Alexandria, Virginia Wounded soldiers inside the home The home of the sanitarwere about forty of these lodges. The convalescent camp, at Alexandria, Virginia, intended for the care of those soldiers discharged from the
rs taken in the Seven Days were treated. Corona College, Corinth, Mississippi Officers' hospital, Nashville, Tennessee McPherson hospital, Vicksburg, Mississippi Chesapeake hospital, Hampton, Virginia Mansion house hospital, Alexandria, Virginia U. S. Marine hospital, Evansville, Indiana Churches used as hospitals in Alexandria Friends' meeting-house, capacity 100 St. Paul's church, capacity 120 Baptist church, capacity 150 Grace church, capacity 75 Lyceum hall, capacity 80 Christ church, episcopal Private residences used as hospitals, Alexandria, Virginia. Prince street, West of Columbus, capacity 95 Corner of king and water streets, capacity 160 Claremont General hospital, capacity 174 Wolfe street General hospital, capacity 100 New Hallowell General hospital, capacity 50 Grosvenor house hospital, capacity 16o for them. They were contained in four cases, one for major operations, one for minor operations
the primary section furnishing the information that the bone had Caring for the wounded from the Mississippi to the Potomac In the upper photograph are soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedysville, Maryland, close to where the battle of Antietam was fought in September, 1862. In the course of the day's fierce firing nearly twenty-five thousand men were killed and worps hospitals was on Smith's farm. In the background of the picture is a fine view of South Mountain. In the foreground the men are gathered about a fire. Soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions After Antietam—army surgeons, huts, and tents for the wounded been shattered, splintered, or split higher up than could be ascertained at first. Conservative surgery was, I might say, almost, if not entirely, a
eadquarters. The buildings were poorly ventilated and poorly drained, and in wet weather stood in a sea of mud. The death-rate here was higher than at most hospitals or prisons. This was partly due to the fact that unoccupied soldiers are far more liable to disease than the soldier at work. These convalescent or parole camps made more trouble for the officers than did those of the active soldiers. Camp Misery was the title at first bestowed by the soldiers on this particular Camp at Alexandria, Va. At first it consisted only of tents, and was badly managed; but later it was entirely reorganized, barracks were built, and Miss Amy Bradley of the Sanitary Commission did much to improve conditions. Two different types of ambulance stand before headquarters, as well as the old-fashioned family carriage. East wards of the convalescent Camp at Alexandria—1864 Convalescent Camp at Alexandria expenditure was not to be considered urgent. The great undertaking was to find the mate