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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 95 95 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 67 57 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 47 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 27 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) or search for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ould not have crossed. On my arrival at Falmouth on the seventeenth, I despatched to General Halleck's Chief of Staff a report which explained the movements of troops up to that date, and who stated the fact of the non-arrival of the pontoon trains. These pontoon trains and supplies, which were expected to meet us on our arrival at Falmouth, could have been readily moved overland in time for our purposes in perfect safety, as they would all the time have been between our army and the Potomac River, and had they started from Washington at the promised time they would have certainly reached Stafford Court House as soon as the advance of General Franklin's grand division, and from that point they could have been forwarded by his teams to Falmouth, if the teams from Washington had needed rest. On the twenty-second not hearing from these trains, I sent a report to General Halleck. It appeared afterward that no supplies had been started overland as suggested in my plan of operations
July 3.--Daylight start, through New Town, Kern's Town, Mill Town, and Winchester; encamped near Darkeville. July 4.--Start to Martinburg; Yanks had left in a hurry; lots of plunder; rested, and then on to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad; tore it up considerable; dreadful tired, all but worn out; still hot and dusty. July 5.--Clear. Into line and marched against the enemy; countermarched, as they had fallen back; drew coffee, lager beer, candy, &c. 10 A. M., took road and marched to Potomac River, near Sheppardstown; waded it, and encamped at Sharpsburg. Onions, &c.; many excesses; troops charged a place where there was liquor; lots of 'em got drunk, necessitating heavy guard duty and stringent orders. July 6.--Clear — still no rain; rest; T. Stuart makes raise from Ld.; we are now on the field of Antietam; ration of whisky issued, being the second I have known in over three years service; drew one month's pay (the officers only) for November, ‘63, yesterday; no use to us her
e to Eastport, Mississippi. But before the embarkation had commenced, I received, January fourteenth, an order from the Lieutenant-General commanding, through the Chief of Staff of the Army, to move with the Twenty-third Army Corps to Annapolis, Maryland. Accordingly the movement was commenced on the following day. The troops moved with their artillery and horses, but without wagons, by steam transports to Cincinnati, Ohio, and thence by rail to Washington, District of Columbia, and Alexandria, Virginia, a second order from Washington having changed the destination from Annapolis. Although in midwinter,and weather unusually severe, even for that season, the movement was effected without delay, accident, or suffering on the part of the troops. By the thirty-first of January the whole command had arrived at Washington and Alexandria. At Alexandria great and unavoidable delay was caused by the freezing of the Potomac, which rendered its navigation impossible much of the time for
these should be and could be taken care of by the local civil authorities without being made a charge on the national treasury. On the evening of the twenty-eighth, having concluded all business requiring my personal attention at Raleigh, and having conferred with every army commander and delegated to him the authority necessary for his future action, I despatched my headquarters wagons by land along with the Seventeenth corps, the office in charge of General Webster from Newbern to Alexandria, Virginia, by sea, and in person, accompanied only by my personal staff, hastened to Savannah, to direct matters in the interior of South Carolina and Georgia. I had received across the rebel telegraph wires cipher despatches from General Wilson at Macon, to the effect that he was in receipt of my Orders No. 65, and would send General Upton's division to Augusta, General McCook's division to Tallahassee, to receive the surrender of those garrisons, take charge of the public property, and execu
The Second division, West Virginia cavalry (Brigadier-General Averell), was now across the Potomac river, his main force in the vicinity of Fair Play, Maryland, and watching the fords on the upper s brigade was cut off from the main force and they quietly withdrew to the other side of the Potomac river, via Shepherdstown ford, and covered that and the Antietam ford; the balance of the First dihe same day (twenty-fifth) the Third division (Brigadier-General Wilson) was sent across the Potomac river, via Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and took position in the vicinity of Boonsboro, Maryland. The next day (twenty-eighth), Brigadier-General Averell's division was ordered to cross the Potomac river at Williamsport ford, and move on Martinsburg, Virginia, the Third division (Brigadier-Generovering the country from Smithfield in the direction of Martinsburg, and the vicinity of the Potomac river. During this time the First division (Brigadier-General Merritt) was reorganized in three