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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Annapolis (Maryland, United States) or search for Annapolis (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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individually." "As to the ungainly troops from Massachusetts, I have nothing to say respecting them. " From Annapolis. A letter from Annapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which hAnnapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which has not been witnessed for years. Some two hundred soldiers attended worship at St. Mary's (Catholic) Church, while others were busily engaged in carting supplies from the Naval Academy to the depot for transportation to Washington. The laborers inental Hotel, J. B. Shoemaker, Edward Rawlings and T. Joseph Rogers. Hessians Committing suicide. A letter from Annapolis, dated April 27, says: To day a recruit from Pennsylvania was punished for some misdemeanor on board one of the sr to Gov. Hicks. In the correspondence which passed between Gen. B. F. Butler, of Massachusetts, and Gov. Hicks, at Annapolis, occurs the following: I have understood within the last hour that some apprehensions were entertained of an insur
further, to accept 25,000 three months men more than the original call, (75,000.) More than that number of the latter have already tendered their services over and above the $5,000 originally asked for. Thus the Government are pushing arrangements to have as soon as possible in arms a total of 183,000 men. Gen. Harney, U. S. A., is now in Washington, at Willard's Hotel. On Monday evening, the Albany Regiment, (the Twenty-fifth,) N. Y. volunteers, arrived in this city by rail from Annapolis. They are seven hundred strong, and are well uniformed and equipped; and the ranks are composed of fine, muscular young men. The six men who were arrested some days ago, and have been kept under guard at the Capital, have been transferred to the custody of the Marched of the District, and were committed to the county jail yesterday by the Chief of Police. They stand charged with uttering additions and treasonable sentiments against the United States. Their names are John W. Richard
Telegraphic Dispatches. Washington, April. 29 --There is good reason for stating that the Naval Academy is to be removed, at least temporarily, from Annapolis to Newport, Sheds Island. It was ascertained at the State Department to-day that no more diplomatic and consular appointments will be made, and no consideraleading to the Capital are opened for the passage of citizens and United States troops. New York, April. 29 --The steamer R. R. Cuyler arrived from Annapolis to-night, with the frigate Constitution in tow, with 250 midshipmen from the Naval Academy, twenty-five seamen, and two companies of Massachusetts troops, one hundred men, to protect the ship. The steamers Alabama and Marion had arrived at Annapolis. Concord, N. H. April. 28 --Our City Council has appropriated $10,000 to aid the volunteers from this city. At Great Falls to-day the churches were closed, and a mass religious meeting was held in Market square — The Granite Sta
From Annapolis. A letter from Annapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which has not been witnessed for years. Some two hundred soldiers attended worship at St. Mary's (Catholic) Church, while others were busily engaged in carting supplies from the Naval Academy to the depot for transportation to Washington. The laborers in the yard were also busily engaged in unloading ships which came in during the morning, while others were erectingAnnapolis, April 29 says: Yesterday (Sunday) presented a spectacle in the ancient city which has not been witnessed for years. Some two hundred soldiers attended worship at St. Mary's (Catholic) Church, while others were busily engaged in carting supplies from the Naval Academy to the depot for transportation to Washington. The laborers in the yard were also busily engaged in unloading ships which came in during the morning, while others were erecting plank quarters, &c. But the most novel scene, in this quiet, religious city, was the departure of a portion of the Eighth Regiment (New York) for Washington, having the clatter of a full drum corps in deadening blast as they passed through the principal streets. However, just as this body had passed through the city an April shower came down in its fullest severity, and the troops returned to the yard and took quarters at the hospital, where they remained until this morning and then depa
Affairs in Alexandria — rumors of an attack — citizens leaving. Alexandria, May 1. --The city is quiet.--Rumors of a meditated attack by Federal troops have caused citizens to leave, and the streets are deserted. More troops arrived at Washington to-day from Annapolis. The Long Bridge across the Potomac is guarded by eight pieces of artillery and a large force of infantry. [Second Dispatch] Alexandria, May 1. --Our city is much excited with rumors of a contemplated occupation by Federal forces. We have been warned by Washingtonians that it is certainly intended. Our scouts were fired upon last night on our side of the aqueduct. S
Hessians Committing suicide. A letter from Annapolis, dated April 27, says: To day a recruit from Pennsylvania was punished for some misdemeanor on board one of the steamers, and after being released jumped overboard and was drowned. Another from the same State, and said to be a recruit from Norristown, attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat. The effort, however, was unsuccessful, and his wounds were properly dressed by one of the surgeons at the hospital, where he now lies in a dangerous condition.
Gen. Butler to Gov. Hicks. In the correspondence which passed between Gen. B. F. Butler, of Massachusetts, and Gov. Hicks, at Annapolis, occurs the following: I have understood within the last hour that some apprehensions were entertained of an insurrection of the negro population of this neighborhood. I am anxious to convince all classes of persons that the forces under my command are not here in any way to interfere with or countenance any interference with the laws of the State. I am, therefore, ready to co-operate with your Excellency in suppressing most promptly and effectively any insurrection against the laws of Maryland. I beg, therefore, that you announce publicly that any portion of the forces under my command is at your Excellency's disposal, to act immediately for the preservation and quietness of the peace of this community. Gov. Hicks replied: I thank you most sincerely for the tender of your men; but I had, before the receipt of your letter,