Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) or search for Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Richard Herron, 1821-1879 (search)
Anderson, Richard Herron, 1821-1879 Military officer; born in South Carolina. Oct. 7, 1821; was graduated at West Point in 1842. He served in the war with Mexico; and in March, 1861, he left the army and became a brigadier-general in the Confederate service. He was wounded at Antietam; commanded a division at Gettysburg; and was made lieutenant-general in 1864. He died in Beaufort, S. C., June 26, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 (search)
Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cemeteries, National (search)
a 3,402124 Ball's Bluff, Va124 Cold Harbor, Va6731,281 City Point, Va3,7781,374 Culpeper, Va456911 Known.Unknown. Danville. Va1,172155 Fredericksburg, Va2,48712,770 Fort Harrison, Va236575 Glendale, Va 234961 Hampton, Va4,930494 Poplar Grove, Va2,1973,993 Richmond, Va8425,700 Seven Pines, Va 1501,208 Staunton, Va 233520 Winchester, Va 2,0942,365 Yorktown, Va 7481,434 Newbern, N. C.2,1771,077 Raleigh, N. C.619562 Salisbury, N. C.9412,032 Wilmington, N. C 7101,398 Beaufort, S. C.4,7484,493 Florence, S C.1992,799 Andersonville, Ga12,793921 Marietta, Ga7,1882,963 Barrancas, Fla 798657 Mobile, Ala756113 Corinth, Miss 1,7893,927 Natchez, Miss3082.780 Vicksburg, Miss3,89612,704 Alexandria, La534772 Baton Rouge, La2,469495 Chalmette, La 6,8375,674 Port Hudson, La5963,223 Brownsville, Tex 1,4171,379 San Antonio, Tex324167 Fayetteville, Ark 431781 Fort Smith, Ark 7111,152 Little Rock, Ark 3,2652,337 Chattanooga, Tenn 7,9994,963 Fort Donelson, Tenn1585
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grayson, William John 1788-1863 (search)
Grayson, William John 1788-1863 Lawyer; born in Beaufort, S. C., Nov. 10, 1788; graduated at the College of Charleston in 1809; began law practice at Beaufort; member of Congress in 1833-37; was opposed to the Civil War. He was the author of The hireling and slave; The country (a poem); The life of James Lewis Petigru, etc. He died in Newberry, Oct. 4, 1863. Grayson, William John 1788-1863 Lawyer; born in Beaufort, S. C., Nov. 10, 1788; graduated at the College of Charleston in 1809; began law practice at Beaufort; member of Congress in 1833-37; was opposed to the Civil War. He was the author of The hireling and slave; The country (a poem); The life of James Lewis Petigru, etc. He died in Newberry, Oct. 4, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Paul 1762-1816 (search)
Hamilton, Paul 1762-1816 Statesman; born in St. Paul's parish, S. C., Oct. 16, 1762; elected comptroller of South Carolina in 1799; governor in 1804. President Madison appointed him Secretary of the Navy in 1809. He died in Beaufort, S. C., June 30, 1816.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huguenots. (search)
ships; and the next morning conveyed a stone column, on which were carved the arms of France, planted it on a flowery knoll, and in the usual manner took possession of the country in the name of the boy-king Charles IX., son of Catharine. A few days later they sailed northward, entered a broad sound which they named Port Royal, on the coast of South Carolina, explored the Coosa and the Combahee, in the land where D'Allyon met a deserved fate, and on Port Royal Island, near the site of Beaufort, made choice of a spot for a colony. The Indians were kind, and so were the Frenchmen, and there was mutual friendship. Ribault addressed his company on the glory to be obtained and the advantage to the persecuted Huguenots by planting there the seed of empire, and asked, Who will undertake the work? Nearly all were willing. A colony of thirty persons was organized by the choice of Albert Pierria for governor. Ribault built a fort, and named it Carolina, in honor of his King, the remai
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Port Royal Ferry, battle of. (search)
Roads, under Admiral Dupont and Gen. T. W. Sherman, had taken possession of Port Royal Sound and the neighboring islands (Nov. 7, 1861), the only stand made by the Confederates in defence of the South Carolina coast islands was at Port Royal Ferry, on the Coosa, at the close of the year. Gen. R. S. Ripley, formerly of the National army, who had joined the Confederates, was in command of that seacoast district, and had established a fortified post at the ferry. When the Nationals landed at Beaufort it had a garrison estimated to be 8,000 strong, under Generals Gregg and Pope. The Nationals proceeded to expel them. For this purpose a joint land and naval force, the former commanded by Brigadier-General Stevens, and the latter by Commodore C. R. P. Rogers, proceeded to attack them. Stevens had about 4,000 troops— of New York, Pennsylvania, and Michigan; and the naval force consisted of four gunboats, an armed ferry-boat, and four large row-boats, each carrying a 12-pounder howitzer.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhett, Robert Barnwell 1800-1876 (search)
Rhett, Robert Barnwell 1800-1876 Legislator; born in Beaufort, S. C., Dec. 24, 1800; was a son of James and Mariana Smith. and adopted the name of Rhett in 1837. Receiving a liberal education, he chose the law as a profession. In 1826 he was a member of the South Carolina legislature, and was attorney-general of the State in 1832, acting at that time with the most ultra wing of the nullification or State supremacy party. From 1838 to 1849 he was a member of Congress, and in 1850-51 United States Senator. It is said that he was the first man who advocated on the floor of Congress the dissolution of the Union. Rhett took a leading part in the secession movements in 1860-61, and was chairman of the committee in the convention at Montgomery by whom the constitution of The Confederate States of America was reported. He owned the Charleston Mercury, of which his son was the editor. He died in St. James parish, La., Sept. 14, 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Savannah, Ga. (search)
ts were completed, on which seventy-six cannon were mounted. Before them a strong abatis was laid. Meanwhile Lincoln had marched from Charleston, and reached the Savannah River on Sept. 12; and on the same day French troops landed below Savannah and marched up to within 3 miles of the town. Lincoln approached, and on Sept. 23 the combined armies commenced a siege. D'Estaing had demanded a surrender of the post on the 16th, when Prevost, hourly expected reinforcements of 800 men from Beaufort, asked for a truce, which was unwisely granted. The reinforcements came, and then Prevost gave a defiant refusal. The siege, begun on Sept. 23, lasted until Oct. 8, with varying success. During the last five days a heavy cannonade and bombardment had been kept up on the British works with very little effect. D'Estaing, impatient of delay, then proposed to take the place by storm. Lincoln reluctantly agreed to the proposal, for there seemed a certainty of final victory if the siege shou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
egion was made by John Ribault, at the head of some Huguenots, in 1562. Settlers in South Carolina. The region was granted to eight of the favorites of Charles II., in 1663, and in 1670 they sent three ships with emigrants, under the direction of Sir William Sayle and Joseph West, to plant a colony below Cape Fear. They entered Port Royal Sound, landed on Beaufort Island, on the spot where the Huguenots had dwelt, and there Sayle died, in 1671. The immigrants soon afterwards abandoned Beaufort, entered Charleston Harbor, went up the Ashley River, and seated themselves on its banks, a few miles above the site of Charleston. West exercised the authority of chief magistrate until the arrival of Gov. Sir John Yeamans, in December, 1671, with fifty families and a large number of slaves from Barbadoes. The next year representative government was established, under the title of the Carteret County Colony—so called in honor of Sir George Carteret. Ten years afterwards the colony remove
1 2