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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 17 (search)
iii. 3. The family was originally from Gabii. Caius Cornelius ;Caius Cornelius) There were two branches of the gens Cornelia, one patrician, the other plebeian, from which sprung this conspirator. with many from the colonies and municipal towns,Municipal towns] Municipiis. The municipia were towns of which the inhabitants were admitted to the rights of Roman citizens, but which were allowed to govern themselves by their own laws, and to choose their own magistrates. See Aul. Gell., xvi. 13; Beaufort, Rep. Rom., vol. v." Bernouf. persons of consequence in their own localities. There were many others, too, among the nobility, concerned in the plot, but less openly; men whom the hope of power, rather than poverty or any other exigence, prompted to join in the affair. But most of the young men, and especially the sons of the nobility, favored the schemes of Catiline; they who had abundant means of living at ease, either splendidly or voluptuously, preferred uncertainties to certainties, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ttigrew, a brother of the distinguished general, J. Johnston Pettigrew, now a minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church, was then owner of two of the most beautiful plantations in the South, Magnolia and Belgrade, large in area, fertile, surrounded by swamps, yet healthy. His numerous slaves were most kindly treated, religiously trained, contented and happy. His manner of speaking was very deliberate, polished, earnest and most impressive. Mr. Fenner B. Satterthwaite, member from Beaufort county, was a born orator. The most eloquent speech I heard in that body of great men was from him. He was one of the leaders of one of the strongest bars in the State. Mr. Kenneth Rayner, delegate from Hertford county, had been for years a conspicuous politician. He spoke always with vehemence, and was occasionally so fiery as to appear excited by anger. Dr. Rufus K. Speed, of Elizabeth City, was such an impressive speaker that he was selected by the Whig party as candidate to be elec
Rumored depredations. --The Wilmington Journal hears, but places little credit in a report, that sundry Lincolnites from Fort Hatteras, now in possession of the Yankees, had, aided, abetted and guided by certain mean persons, resident on the banks, made a foray upon the mainland of Beaufort county, destroying and stealing property and running off negroes.
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1862., [Electronic resource], Fight between Maryland and Massachusetts Yankees. (search)
Fight between Maryland and Massachusetts Yankees. We have been furnished with an extract of a letter written in Beaufort county, N. C. near Newbern, and dated June 29, 1862, which contains a piece of information which we deem highly important. We give below the extract as furnished us, and think its statements may be relied upon: "I have just heard from Barrington's. A fight occurred in Newbern, in which Massachusetts and Maryland soldiers became involved. A regiment of each became engaged; 300 of the New England men were said to have been killed and 150 of the Marylanders. The disturbance arose about the negroes within the lines there. The Massachusetts men proposed to send a lot of them to Cabe for sale. It was opposed by the Marylanders. Since hearing the above, Mr, F. P. Letham confirms the report."
The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], Reported Confederate triumph in North Carolina. (search)
Reported Confederate triumph in North Carolina. A report reached this city yesterday afternoon that our forces, after an obstinate fight on Tuesday succeeded in driving the enemy out of the town of Washington, N. C., and that we now hold the place. Washington is in Beaufort county, at the mouth of Tar river, and in the heart of one of the richest agricultural sections of the State of North Carolina. Large quantities of produce are said to be now in store in that region. Of the particulars of the fight on Tuesday we were unable to learn anything; but the report is so well authenticated that we think there can be no doubt of its correctness.