Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) or search for Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Guildfor Dudley, 1834- (search)
Bailey, Guildfor Dudley, 1834- Military officer; born at Martinsburg, Lewis co., N. Y., June 4, 1834; was graduated at West Point in 1856, and entered, as lieutenant, the 2d Artillery, then stationed at Fort Ontario, Oswego, N. Y., where, in 1858, he married a daughter of Col. G. W. Patten, U. S. A. He was afterwards stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and when the Civil War began he was acting adjutant of the post at Fort Brown, Texas, whose commander, Captain Stoneman, refused to surrender to the Confederates of Texas in obedience to the orders of General Twiggs. Captain Stoneman chartered a steamboat, and, after securing the most valuable public property there, evacuated the fort and sailed for New York, where he arrived March 15, 1861. Soon afterwards Lieutenant Bailey was sent with reinforcements for Fort Pickens. His mission was successful. Sickness finally compelled him to return to New York to recruit his strength. Soon afterwards he was requested by Governor Morgan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
MicanopyJune 9, 1836 Fort DraneAug. 21, 1836 Wahoo SwampNov. 17, 18, and 21, Okeechobee LakeDec. 25, 1837 CarloosahatcheeJuly 23, 1839 Fort KingApril 28, 1840 Near Fort BrookeMar. 2, 1841 Big HammockApril 19, 1842 War against Mexico. Fort BrownMay 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 a MicanopyJune 9, 1836 Fort DraneAug. 21, 1836 Wahoo SwampNov. 17, 18, and 21, Okeechobee LakeDec. 25, 1837 CarloosahatcheeJuly 23, 1839 Fort KingApril 28, 1840 Near Fort BrookeMar. 2, 1841 Big HammockApril 19, 1842 War against Mexico. Fort BrownMay 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Fort, (search)
Brown, Fort, A fortified post on the Rio Grande, erected in 1846. and named in honor of Maj. Jacob Brown. U. S. A. It was built by General Taylor immediately after his arrival at the river opposite Matamoras with a part of the army of occupation (March 29, 1846), and was designed to accommodate 2,000 men. It was placed in command of Major Brown. Taylor was ordered by General Ampudia, commander of the Mexican forces at Matamoras, to withdraw within twenty-four hours, as he claimed the territory around Fort Brown belonged to the Department of Tamaulipas. a part of Mexico. Taylor refused to do so: and when he had gone hack to Point Isabel with a part of his forces, leaving Major Brown in command. Arista crossed the river with some troops to attack the fort. His army was hourly increasing in strength. On the night of May 4 the Mexicans erected a battery behind the fort. and early the next morning opened a heavy fire from it upon the fortification. At the same time the batter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Jacob, 1775-1828 (search)
ds in Ohio. In 1798 he opened a select school in the city of New York, and studied law. Some of his newspaper essays attracted the notice of General Brown's monument. Gen. Alexander Hamilton, to whom he became secretary while that officer was acting general-in-chief of the army raised to fight the French. On leaving that service he went to northern New York, purchased lands on the banks of the Black River, not many miles from Sackett's Harbor, and founded the flourishing settlement of Brownsville, where he erected the first building within 30 miles of Lake Ontario. There he became county judge; colonel of the militia in 1809; brigadier-general in 1810; and, in 1812, received the appointment of commander of the frontier from Oswego to Lake St. Francis, a line 200 miles in extent. He performed excellent service on that frontier and that of the Niagara during the War of 1812-15, receiving two severe wounds in battle. For his services he received the thanks of Congress and a gold m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cemeteries, National (search)
Staunton, Va 233520 Winchester, Va 2,0942,365 Yorktown, Va 7481,434 Newbern, N. C.2,1771,077 Raleigh, N. C.619562 Salisbury, N. C.9412,032 Wilmington, N. C 7101,398 Beaufort, S. C.4,7484,493 Florence, S C.1992,799 Andersonville, Ga12,793921 Marietta, Ga7,1882,963 Barrancas, Fla 798657 Mobile, Ala756113 Corinth, Miss 1,7893,927 Natchez, Miss3082.780 Vicksburg, Miss3,89612,704 Alexandria, La534772 Baton Rouge, La2,469495 Chalmette, La 6,8375,674 Port Hudson, La5963,223 Brownsville, Tex 1,4171,379 San Antonio, Tex324167 Fayetteville, Ark 431781 Fort Smith, Ark 7111,152 Little Rock, Ark 3,2652,337 Chattanooga, Tenn 7,9994,963 Fort Donelson, Tenn158511 Knoxville, Tenn2,0901,046 Memphis, Tenn 5,1608,817 Nashville, Tenn 11,8254,701 Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.. 1,2292,361 Stone River, Tenn3,8212,324 Camp Nelson, Ky2,4771,165 Cave Hill, Louisville, Ky3,344583 Danville, Ky 3358 Lebanon, Ky 591277 Lexington, Ky805108 Logan's, Ky 345366 Crown Hill, Indianapolis,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
f the Rio Grande, where he established a camp and began the erection of a fort, which he named Fort Brown, in honor of Major Brown, in command there. The Mexicans were so eager for war that, becauswithdrawal of his troops within twenty-four hours. Taylor refused, and continued to strengthen Fort Brown. Ampudia hesitated, when General Arista was put in his place as commander-in-chief of the Normy of Occupation became critical. Parties of armed Mexicans soon got between Point Isabel and Fort Brown and cut off all intercommunication. A reconnoitring party under Captain Thornton was surpriseay. This departure of Taylor from the Rio Grande emboldened the Mexicans, who opened fire upon Fort Brown, May 3, from Matamoras, and a large body crossed the river to attack it in the rear. Taylor hsolitary flight General Taylor's attack on Monterey. across the Rio Grande. The garrison at Fort Brown was relieved. In the mean while, Congress had declared, May 11, 1846, that, by the act of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Palo Alto, battle of (search)
Palo Alto, battle of On a part of a prairie in Texas, about 8 miles northeast of Matamoras, Mexico, flanked by ponds and beautified by tall trees (which gave it its name), General Taylor, marching with less than 2,300 men from Point Isabel towards Fort Brown, encountered about 6,000 Mexicans, led by General Arista, in 1846. At a little past noon a furious battle was begun with artillery by the Mexicans and a cavalry attack with the lance. The Mexicans were forced back, and, after a contest of about five hours, they retreated to Resaca de la Palma and encamped. They fled in great disorder, having lost in the engagement 100 men killed and wounded. The Americans lost fifty-three men. During the engagement Major Ringgold, commander of the American Flying Artillery, which did terrible work in the ranks of the Mexicans, was mortally wounded by a small cannonball that passed through both thighs and through his horse. Rider and horse both fell to the ground. The latter was dead; th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Resaca de la Palma, battle of (search)
Resaca de la Palma, battle of At 2 A. M. on May 9, 1846, the little army of General Taylor, which had fought the Mexicans the day before at Palo Alto (q. v.), were awakened from their slumbers on the battle-field to resume their march for Fort Brown. The cautious leader prepared for attack on the way, for the smitten foe had rallied. He saw no traces of them until towards evening, when, as the Americans emerged from a dense thicket, the Mexicans were discovered strongly posted in battle order in a broad ravine about 4 feet deep and 200 feet wide, the dry bed of a series of pools, skirted with palmetto-trees, and called Resaca de la Palma. Within that natural trench the Mexicans had planted a battery that swept the road over which the Americans were approaching. Taylor pressed forward, and, after some severe skirmishing, in which a part of his army was engaged, he ordered Captain May, leader of dragoons, to charge upon the battery. Rising in his stirrups, May called out to his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sieges. (search)
the United States. See also battles. Fort William Henry, New York1757 Louisburg, Canada1758 Fort Ticonderoga, New York1758-59 Boston, Massachusetts1775 Fort Henry, West Virginia 1777 Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania1777 Fort Schuyler, New York 1777 Charleston, South Carolina1780, 1864-65 Fort Ninety-six, South Carolina1781 Yorktown, Virginia1781 and 1862 Fort Wabash, Indiana1812 Fort Wayne, Indiana1812 Fort George, Canada1813 Fort Meigs, Ohio1813 Fort Stephenson, Ohio1813 Fort Erie, Canada1814 Fort Brown, Texas1846 Monterey, Mexico1846 Puebla, Mexico1847 Vera Cruz, Mexico1847 Fort Pickens, Florida1861 Corinth, Mississippi1862 Fort Pulaski, Georgia1862 Island No.10, Kentucky1862 Fort Wagner, South Carolina1863 Port Hudson, Louisiana1863 Vicksburg, Mississippi1863 Atlanta, Georgia1864 Forts Gaines and Morgan, Mobile, Alabama1864 Fort Fisher, North Carolina1864-65 Richmond, Virginia1864-65 Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama1865 Santiago, Cuba1898
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stoneman, George 1822-1894 (search)
Stoneman, George 1822-1894 Military officer; born in Busti, Chautauqua co., N. Y., Aug. 8, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1846; was captain, in command of Fort Brown, Tex., in 1861; and refused to obey the order of Gen. Twiggs (q. v.) to surrender the government property to the Confederates. He chartered a steamer, evacuated the post, and proceeded to New York, where he arrived March 15. He was made major of the 1st United States Cavalry, and served in western Virginia as inspector-general until made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers and chief of cavalry, in August. He was active in the Peninsular campaign in 1862; and after the fall of General Kearny, at Chantilly, he took command of that general's division. Gen. George Stoneman. He succeeded General Heintzelman as commander of the 3d Army Corps, which he led in the battle of Fredericksburg, and was promoted to major-general in November, 1862. In the Richmond campaign, in May, 1863, he commanded a cavalry corps on raids
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