hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 36 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 68 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 30 8 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 16 16 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 552 results in 201 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
entsville, 305 Bridgewater, 435 Brinly's Land, 246 Bristol, 466 Bristow, 54, 114, 115, 117, 133, 304, 305, 307 Broad Run, 116, 117, 118, 306 Brock Road, 352 Brockenborough, Colonel, 170, 173 Brock's Gap, 334, 339, 382 Brown, Captain, 97, 98, 127, 131, 176, 179, 199, 206, 241, 244 Brown, Captain, Wm. F., 97, 99, 108, 110 Brownsburg, 328 Brown's Gap, 371, 433, 434 Brucetown, 413 Buchanan, 327, 329, 330, 369, 375, 377, 380 Buckner's Neck, 160 Buffalo, 328 Buffalo Gap, 326, 327 Buford, Colonel, 278 Buford, General (U. S. A.), 266 Buford's Depot, 377 Buford's Gap, 377 Bull Mountain, 114 Bull Pasture River, 326 Bull Run, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 37, 39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58, 118, 119, 127, 128, 129, 306 Bunker Hill, 163, 284, 400, 402, 403, 406, 408, 410, 411, 413, 419, 420 Burke's Station, 50 Burnside, General (U. S. A.), 104, 1.05, 106, 131, 132, 150, 151, 158, 165,
g and brotherly love. It is not necessary that you should enter Kentucky and interfere in that State, to use the language of Mr. Lincoln. It is just as offensive to interfere from this State, or send your missiles over there. I care not whether an enemy, if he is going to assault us, shall actually come into our State, or come along the line, and throw his bomb-shells over to explode in our midst. Suppose England should plant a battery on the Canadian side of the Niagara river, opposite Buffalo, and throw bomb-shells over, which would explode in Main street, in that city, and destroy the buildings, and that, when we protested, she would say, in the language of Mr. Lincoln, that she never dreamed of coming into the United States to interfere with us, and that she was just throwing her bombs over the line from her own side, which she had a right to do, would that explanation satisfy us? So it is with Mr. Lincoln. He is not going into Kentucky, but he will plant his batteries on th
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Senator Douglas, delivered July 17, 1858, at Springfield, III (Mr. Lincoln was not present.) (search)
u carried on the warfare from another State? For the purpose of illustration, suppose the British Government should plant a battery on the Niagara river opposite Buffalo and throw their shells over into Buffalo, where they should explode and blow up the houses and destroy the town. We call the British Government to an account, anBuffalo, where they should explode and blow up the houses and destroy the town. We call the British Government to an account, and they say, in the language of Mr. Lincoln, we did not enter into the limits of the United States to interfere with you; we planted the battery on our own soil, and had a right to shoot from our own soil, and if our shells and ball fell in Buffalo and killed your inhabitants, why, it is your look-out, not ours. Thus, Mr. Lincoln iBuffalo and killed your inhabitants, why, it is your look-out, not ours. Thus, Mr. Lincoln is going to plant his Abolition batteries all along the banks of the Ohio river, and throw his shells into Virginia and Kentucky and into Missouri, and blow up the institution of slavery, and when we arraign him for his unjust interference with the institutions of the other States, he says, Why, I never did enter into Kentucky to in
d a speech the burden of which was an answer to the Southern charges of coercion and invasion. From Indianapolis he moved on to Cincinnati and Columbus, at the last-named place meeting the Legislature of Ohio. The remainder of the journey convinced Mr. Lincoln of his strength in the affections of the people. Many, no doubt, were full of curiosity to see the now famous rail-splitter, but all were outspoken and earnest in their assurances of support. At Steubenville, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Buffalo, Albany, New York, and Philadelphia he made manly and patriotic speeches. These speeches, plain in language and simple in illustration, made every man who heard them a stronger friend than ever of the Government. He was skilful enough to warn the people of the danger ahead and to impress them with his ability to deal properly with the situation, without in any case outlining his intended policy or revealing the forces he held in reserve. The following are extracts from Mr. Lincoln's l
el in the history of the continent or the world. At every halt in the sombre march vast crowds, such as never before had collected together, filed past the catafalque for a glimpse of the dead chieftain's face. Farmers left their farms, workmen left their shops, societies and soldiers marched in solid columns, and the great cities poured forth their population in countless masses. From Washington the funeral train moved to Baltimore, thence to Harrisburg, Philadelphia, New York, Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago, and at last to Springfield. As the funeral cortege passed through New York it was reverently gazed upon by a mass of humanity impossible to enumerate. No ovation could be so eloquent as the spectacle of the vast population, hushed and bareheaded under the bright spring sky, gazing upon his coffin. Lincoln's own words over the dead at Gettysburg came to many as the stately car went by: The world will little note nor long remember what we say
thousands, and in the great cities into almost unmanageable assemblages. Everywhere there were vociferous calls for Mr. Lincoln, and, if he showed himself, for a speech. Whenever there was sufficient time, he would step to the rear platform of the car and bow his acknowledgments as the train was moving away, and sometimes utter a few words of thanks and greeting. At the capitals of Indiana, Ohio, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, as also in the cities of Cincinnati, Cleveland, Buffalo, New York, and Philadelphia, a halt was made for one or two days, and a program was carried out of a formal visit and brief address to each house of the legislature, street processions, large receptions in the evening, and other similar ceremonies; and in each of them there was an unprecedented outpouring of the people to take advantage of every opportunity to see and to hear the future Chief Magistrate of the Union. Party foes as well as party friends made up these expectant crowds. The p
ntment demanded. This requirement was a pair of Monroe shoes. Now, out in Ohio, what Monroe shoes were was a mystery — not a shoemaker in my section having so much as an inkling of the construction of the perplexing things, until finally my eldest brother brought an idea of them from Baltimore, when it was found that they were a familiar pattern under another name. At length the time for my departure came, and I set out for West Point, going by way of Cleveland and across Lake Erie to Buffalo. On the steamer I fell in with another appointee en route to the academy, David S. Stanley, also from Ohio; and when our acquaintanceship had ripened somewhat, and we had begun to repose confidence in each other, I found out that he had no Monroe shoes, so I deemed myself just that much ahead of my companion, although my shoes might not conform exactly to the regulations in Eastern style and finish. At Buffalo Stanley and I separated, he going by the Erie Canal and I by the railroad, sin
eaty of Medicine Lodge going to Fort Dodge discontented Indians Indian outrages a delegation of chiefs terrible Indian raid death of Comstock vast herds of Buffalo preparing for a winter campaign meeting Buffalo bill he Undertakes a dangerous task Forsyth's gallant fight rescued. The headquarters of the military depBuffalo bill he Undertakes a dangerous task Forsyth's gallant fight rescued. The headquarters of the military department to which I was assigned when relieved from duty at New Orleans was at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and on the 5th of September I started for that post. In due time I reached St. Louis, and stopped there a day to accept an ovation tendered in approval of the course I had pursued in the Fifth Military District--a public demonstal instinct and aptitude, soon became excellent guides and courageous and valuable scouts, some of them, indeed, gaining much distinction. Mr. William F. Cody ( Buffalo bill ), whose renown has since become world-wide, was one of the men thus selected. He received his sobriquet from his marked success in killing buffaloes for a
Chapter XIV A winter expedition herds of Buffalo wolves blizzards a terrible night finding the bodies of Elliott's party the abandoned Indian camps pushing down the Washita the captured chiefs Evans's successful fight establishing Fort Sill California Joe duplicity of the Cheyennes ordered to repair to Washington. A few days were necessarily lost setting up and refitting the Kansas regiment after its rude experience in the Cimarron canons. This through with, the expedition, supplied with thirty days rations, moved out to the south on the 7th of December, under my personal command. We headed for the Witchita Mountains, toward which rough region all the villages along the Washita River had fled after Custer's fight with Black Kettle. My line of march was by way of Custer's battle-field, and thence down the Washita, and if the Indians could not sooner be brought to terms, I intended to follow them into the Witchita Mountains from near old Fort Cobb. The
he stories of violence to Union men at Baltimore. There is a great feeling among business men of the city for the re-establishment of trade, and silent conservatism is changing gradually to open Unionism.--N. Y. Times, April 27. A large meeting of the ladies of Syracuse, N. Y., was held, to organize for providing supplies for the volunteers. Mrs. E. W. Leavenworth was made president, Mrs. II. W. Chittenden, vice-president, and Mrs. J. B. Burnet, treasurer. The Common Council of Buffalo, N. Y., yesterday appropriated $35,000 to equip the Sixty-fifth and Seventy-fourth Regiments.--N. Y. Times, April 27. The Seventh Regiment of New York took the oath to support the Constitution of the United States, at the War Department, in Washington; not a man flinched; the scene was most impressive. Moses Herrick of the Beverly Company, Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, met with an accident by the discharge of a gun.--N. Y. Tribune, April 29. The Federal Government is taking most
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...