hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 86 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 35 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Decatur (Illinois, United States) or search for Decatur (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 7 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
gainst the Augusta road at some point east of Decatur near Stone Mountain. General Garrard's cavalr on the 18th, at a point seven miles east of Decatur, and with General Garrard's cavalry and Generes, and General Schofield reached the town of Decatur. On the 19th General McPherson turned along the railroad into Decatur and General Schofield followed a road toward Atlanta, leading off by C General McPherson, who had advanced from Decatur, continued to follow substantially the railrodiagonal path or wagon track leading from the Decatur road in the direction of General Blair's leftal McPherson had also left his wagon train at Decatur, under a guard of three regiments, commanded e sound of guns was heard in the direction of Decatur. No doubt could longer be entertained of theabsent at Covington by my order), had reached Decatur and attempted to capture the wagon trains, buhofield and Thomas, and not drawing back from Decatur until every wagon was safe, except three, whi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
reconnaissances. The Army of the Tennessee, forming the left wing, was directed toward Stone Mountain; the Army of the Ohio, in the center, toward Cross Keys and Decatur, and the Army of the Cumberland, on the right, via Buck Head, toward Atlanta. The left wing and the center crossed Nancy's Creek the same day, July 18. The cavalry division of General Garrard, which had been operating on the extreme left, succeeded in reaching the Augusta railroad between Decatur and Stone Mountain. On the next day, July 19, the Twenty-third Army Corps, after a sharp skirmish, occupied Decatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the ODecatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the Ohio then withdrew, and passing to the right camped for the night on Pea Vine Creek. The Army of the Cumberland crossed a small force over Peach Tree Creek, which maintained its footing. July 20, the Army of the Tennessee advanced along the Augusta railroad to within about three and a half miles of Atlanta, where the enemy was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
rossing the creek beyond the enenmy's left flank, turned his position, forced him from the bridge-head, and moved over two brigades of his division to hold the points gained. He immediately commenced to rebuild the bridge. Stanley also, on the Decatur road, repaired the old bridge and constructed a new one. Newton's division was moved to Peach Tree Creek in support of General Wood. Stanley moved across the north fork and encamped for the night. July 20, there being a slight conflict ofrect Atlanta road, and to move the other two as directly as possible to the support of General Schofield. General Newton was instructed to relieve the troops of General Wood in his vicinity, and General Wood to close up on General Stanley on the Decatur road. General Stanley commenced the march at 7 a. m., and proceeded to the crossing of the south fork of Peach Tree Creek, followed by General Wood. Here the bridge was found to have been burned. Having pushed over a strong skirmish line, a n
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st demonstrations were constantly kept up against the enemy's position, to favor the movements of Kilpatrick. By the display of troops, exhibition of flags in new places, and by strong reconnaissances pushed south of the Decatur road the enemy were impressed with the belief that we had extended our lines to the left, and considerable change was made in his disposition of troops to meet us. These demonstrations, always resulting in severe skirmishes, were not without somrtment commander, but owing to the lateness of the hour it was not deemed advisable to move the whole force, and one brigade of General Wood's division and the pickets of the command were pushed out to cover the road leading by Morrow's Mills to Decatur. General Newton, at Mann's house, on the Shoal Creek road, reported the enemy in considerable force, and intrenched between himself and Morrow's Mills. Early August 31 the corps was moved in the direction of Rough and Ready by way of Thorn's
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
. At 5 ). m. August 6 I was ordered to make a demonstration toward Atlanta, with a re-enforced skirmish line. The demonstration was continued till dusk, when the original status was resumed without casualty. August 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, nothing but the ordinary picket duty was required of this brigade. 12th, at 11 a. m. made a reconnaissance to the front with two of my regiments and two of the First Division. Drove back the rebel pickets and got a good view of their main works on the Decatur road. Lost 1 man killed. Returned by 2 p. m. 13th and 14th, all quiet in my command. 15th, the cavalry left and my lines were extended to the left. 16th, at 8.20 p. m. received orders to move a thousand yards to the left; the movement was effected at once. 17th, ordered ready to move with great secrecy to-morrow at dusk. 18th, had fires built to my left to the extent of another brigade to induce the enemy to believe we were developing our left. Orders to move suspended. 19th, the b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
eployed as skirmishers, and pressing forward took position on the crest of the ridge, which later in the day was occupied by this brigade. This position was within one and three-fourths of a mile of the courthouse in Atlanta, and about 800 yards of the enemy's fortifications, consisting of detached field-works for artillery, without any connecting curtains, and which were apparently not held in strong force by him, he having massed his troops on his right, where, in the afternoon, near the Decatur road, he attacked our left wing, consisting of the Army of the Tennessee, under General McPherson, meeting with greater disaster than on the 20th, when he attempted to break our center. About 10 a. m., this brigade being relieved by the division of General Newton (who established and fortified our vacated line and occupied it during the subsequent operations of our troops before Atlanta), we moved to the left and rear and massed in the rear of Knefler's brigade, who at that time joined the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
o send two regiments back as a guard to the bridge he built over the north fork of Peach Tree Creek. This order countermanded at 7 p.m. 6 p. m., General Stanley puts all of his troops in line of battle. His reserve brigade was put on his left to relieve Schofield's right brigade, which was moved off to the left and rear to prevent the enemy from again turning the army. 7.30 p. m., directed Major-General Stanley to send fifty men to the rear to the point where his column turns off of the Decatur road in marching to his present position, as a guard or alarm post. At same time directed General Newton to send a small force for a like purpose to the point where he crossed Peach Tree Creek, and, at same time, directed General Wood to send a small force for a like purpose about two miles to the rear toward the camp he left this a. m. No call was made for the troops of the corps to move to the left. The enemy attacked the Army of the Tennessee with three corps. At first he (the enemy)