hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 86 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 35 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Decatur (Illinois, United States) or search for Decatur (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 19 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
merican government the annual tribute in precisely such articles as he wanted, dismissed the American consul, declared war, and his corsairs captured American vessels and reduced the crews to slavery. The American consul--Mr. Lear--was compelled to pay the Dey $27,000 for the security of himself and family and a few other Americans there from horrid slavery. Determined to pay tribute no longer to the insolent semi-barbarian, the American government accepted the Dey's challenge for war, and in May, 1815, sent Commodore Decatur to the Mediterranean with a squadron to humble the Dey. Decatur found the Algerine pirate-fleet cruising for American vessels. He played havoc with the corsairs, entered the Bay of Algiers (June 28), demanded the instant surrender of all American prisoners, full indemnification for all property destroyed, and absolute relinquishment of all claims to tribute from the United States there-after. The terrified Dey complied with the demand. See Decatur, Stephen.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barron, James, 1769-1851 (search)
uspension he entered the merchant service, and remained abroad until 1818, when an attempt was made to restore him to duty in the naval service. Commodore Decatur and other officers resisted this, and a bitter correspondence between Barron and Decatur ensued. James Barron. Barron challenged his antagonist to fight a duel. They met near Bladensburg (March 22, 1820), and Decatur was mortally wounded. Barron was severely hurt, but recovered after several months of suffering. During the latand other officers resisted this, and a bitter correspondence between Barron and Decatur ensued. James Barron. Barron challenged his antagonist to fight a duel. They met near Bladensburg (March 22, 1820), and Decatur was mortally wounded. Barron was severely hurt, but recovered after several months of suffering. During the latter years of his long life Barron held several important commands on shore. He became senior officer of the navy in 1839, and died in Norfolk, Va., April 21, 1851.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 (search)
Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 Naval officer; born in New York, Aug. 15, 1798; entered the naval service in June, 1812; served with Decatur in 1813-14; with Chauncey, on Lake Ontario, in 1814; and with Decatur again, in the Mediterranean, in 1815. He was with the squadron in the West Indies (1824-29) operating against the pirates there. In 1860 he was in command of the Norfolk navy-yard: commanded the Pacific squadron in 1862-64, and the navy-yard at Brooklyn 1865-68. In July, 1866, he was made a rear-admiral. he died in New Brunswick, N. J., Feb. 19, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bladensburg duelling field. (search)
en in position the muzzle of their pieces nearly touched, and at the word both fired together, and Mason fell dead, and McCarty was seriously wounded. The famous Decatur-Barron duel occurred at Bladensburg, March 22, 1820. Stephen Decatur and James Barron had both been captains in the United States navy. Barron had been found guilty of the charge of neglecting his duty while in command of the Chesapeake, and had been suspended from the service. Decatur had served on both the court of inquiry and the court-martial trying the case. Barron had subsequently applied for restoration of his rank, and had been opposed by Decatur, not from personal reasons, but cause of the enmity between the two officers, and a long and bitter correspondence, which finally culminated in a duel. They fought with pistols at 8 paces, and Decatur was fatally and his antagonist dangerously wounded at the first fire. They held a brief conversation as they lay on the ground, exchanging full forgiveness of ea
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blue lights. (search)
lights were burning on both sides of the river, near its month. The lights were blue, and placed in position by treasonable men to warn the British blockaders of Decatur's final movements. There were Peace-men in almost every place in New England, who did all they could to embarrass their government in its prosecution of the war. So betrayed, Decatur gave up the design, and tried every means to discover the betrayers, but without success. The Federalists denied the fact, but the blue signal-lights had been seen by too many to make the denial of any effect. In a letter to the Secretary of the Navy, Decatur wrote: Notwithstanding these signals have been reDecatur wrote: Notwithstanding these signals have been repeated, and have been seen by at least twenty persons in this squadron, there are many in New London who have the hardihood to affect to disbelieve it and the effrontery to deny it. The whole Federal party, traditionally opposed to the war, were often compelled to bear the odium of the bad conduct of the Peace faction. They had t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Decatur, Stephen, 1779- (search)
prisoners of war, and the crew were made slaves. Decatur caught a Tripolitan ketch laden with maidens, whom ness, and acted with more caution in the future. Decatur commanded a division of gunboats in the attack on Tth the commander. The fight was brief but deadly. Decatur slew his antagonist, and the vessel was captured. oard. In command of the frigate United States, Decatur captured the frigate Macedonian, Oct. 25, 1812, forrty-nine guns. She was badly cut in the fight, and Decatur thought best to order his prize to Newport, while hbout a mile from Georgetown, built by Joel Barlow. Decatur had opposed the reinstatement of Barron to his formhich both fell at the first fire. The ball entered Decatur's body two inches above the hip and lodged against Barron's wound is severe, but not dangerous. The Decatur's monument. ball struck the upper part of his hip a public estimation. The excitement is very great. Decatur died March 22, and his remains were taken from the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), France, early relations with. (search)
war to capture French cruisers. A marine corps was organized, and thirty cruisers were provided for. The frigates United States, Constitution, and Constellation, already built, were soon made ready for sea under such commanders as Dale, Barry, Decatur the elder, Truxton, Nicholson, and Phillips. Decatur soon captured a French corsair (April, 1798). So many American armed vessels in West India waters, in the summer and autumn of 1798, astonished the British and French authorities there. At tDecatur soon captured a French corsair (April, 1798). So many American armed vessels in West India waters, in the summer and autumn of 1798, astonished the British and French authorities there. At the close of that year the American navy consisted of twenty-three vessels, with a total of 446 guns. It was much strengthened during the year 1799 by the launching and putting into commission several new ships, and victories over the French on the ocean were gained. In February, 1799, Commodore Truxton, in the Constellation, captured the French frigate L'Insurgente; and in February, 1800, he gained a victory over the French frigate La Vengeance. The convention at Paris brought about peace be
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand army of the republic, the. (search)
suggesting the formation of this union of veteran soldiers, and of launching the organization into existence. The object of the combination was to afford assistance to disabled and unemployed soldiers. Dr. Stephenson had been a surgeon in a volunteer regiment during the war, and was firmly convinced that an organization of the returned volunteers, for mutual benefit, was imperatively needed. A ritual was drafted under his supervision, and the first post of the new order was formed at Decatur, Ill. Other posts were soon mustered throughout Illinois and contiguous States, and the first department (State) convention was held at Springfield, Ill., July 12, 1866. Gen. John M. Palmer was there elected department commander. Oct. 31, 1866, Dr. Stephenson, as provisional commander-in-chief, sent out an order to all the posts then formed, calling for the first national convention of the Grand Army of the Republic. This was held in Indianapolis, Ind., on Nov. 20 following, and representati
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, James 1744-1826 (search)
an ardent patriot. He raised a troop of cavalry, and was at once commander and chaplain. He is the author of a Report of a Missionary Tour through the Mississippi and the southwestern country. He died in Bethany, N. C., July 25, 1826. Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 19, 1793; enlisted as a private in 1812; commanded a detachment from his company at the battle of Chippewa in 1814 and at the siege of Fort Erie; received a commission in the army in 1815; and served in Decatur's expedition to Algiers on the United States brig Enterprise. He left the army in 1818; was admitted to the bar the same year; removed to Shawneetown, Ill., in 1820, and to Cincinnati in 1833. He edited at various times the Illinois gazette, the Illinois Intelligencer, the Illinois monthly magazine, and the Western monthly magazine. Among his published works are Life of Thomas Posey; Life of Gen. W. H. Harrison; Notes on the Western States; History of the Indian tribes; The wilderness a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, Jacob -1850 (search)
Jones, Jacob -1850 Naval officer; born near Smyrna, Del., in March, 1768; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, Jacob Jones. and entered the navy as a midshipman in 1799. He was an officer of the Philadelphia when she was captured at Tripoli. In 1810 he was made commander, and when the War of 1812-15 broke out he was in charge of the sloop-of-war Wasp, in which he gained a victory. He commanded the Macedonian, in Decatur's squadron, as post-captain. After the war he commanded the Mediterranean squadron; was a commissioner of the navy board; and governor of the naval asylum at Philadelphia. Congress voted him thanks and a gold medal and several States presented him with swords. He died in Philadelphia, Aug. 3, 1850.
1 2