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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Congress, Continental (search)
t of recent events in Massachusetts was laid before them; also a letter from the Congress of that province, asking advice as to the form of government to be adopted there, and requesting the Continental Congress to assume control of the army at Cambridge. This second Congress was regarded by the colonists as no longer a committee of conference, but a provisional government. The first Congress claimed no political power, though their signatures to the American Association implied as much. Thee to the late act of Parliament for subverting the charter of Massachusetts, and advised the Congress of that province to organize a government in as near conformity to the charter as circumstances would admit. The Congress adopted the army at Cambridge as a continental one; appointed a commander-in-chief (June 15), with four major-generals and eight brigadiers; arranged the rank and pay of officers, and perfected a preliminary organization of the army. They worked industriously in perfecting
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Convention troops. (search)
Convention troops. When Burgoyne's army surrendered to General Gates, these generals agreed that the prisoners (over 5,000) should be marched to Cambridge, near Boston, to embark for England, on their parole not to serve again against the Americans. Suspecting that the parole would be violated, Congress, after ratifying, revoked it. As the British government did not recognize the authority of Congress, these troops remained near Boston until Congress, owing to the scarcity of supplies in New England, ordered them to Virginia, whither they went, October and November, 1778, 4,000 remaining at Charlottesville until October, 1780, when the British were removed to Fort Frederick, in Maryland, and the Germans to Winchester, their numbers reduced to 2,100. Soon after they were removed to Lancaster, and some to East Windsor, Conn. In the course of 1782 they were dispersed by exchange or desertion. See Burgoyne, Sir John.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 (search)
of the Continental Congress from 1776 to 1778, and again in 1784; member of the board of war, Nov. 17, 1777; and was at the head of a committee charged with the entire reorganization of the army. When Mr. Adams went on an embassy to negotiate a treaty of peace and commerce with Great Britain, Mr. Dana was secretary of the legation. At Paris, early in 1781, he received the appointment from Congress of minister to Russia, clothed with power to make the accession of the United States to the armed neutrality. He resided two years at St. Petersburg, and returned to Berlin in 1783. He was again in Congress in the spring of 1784, and the next year was made a justice of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. In 1791 he was appointed chief-justice of Massachusetts, which position he held fifteen years, keeping aloof from political life, except in 1792 and 1806, when he was Presidential elector. He retired from the bench and public life in 1806, and died in Cambridge, Mass., April 25, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Richard, 1699- (search)
Dana, Richard, 1699- Jurist; born in Cambridge, Mass., July 7, 1699; graduated at Harvard in 1718; and was a leader of the bar in the Revolutionary period. He was a member of the Sons of Liberty, and also a member of the committee to investigate the incidents of the Boston massacre in 1770. He died May 17, 1772.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Richard Henry, 1787-1879 (search)
Dana, Richard Henry, 1787-1879 Poet and essayist; born in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 15, 1787; son of Francis Dana; chose the profession of law, but his tastes led him into literary pursuits. In 1814 he and others founded the North American review, of which he was sole conductor for a while. He closed his connection with it in 1820. It was while Dana was editor of the Review that Bryant's Thanatopsis was published in its pages, the author being then unknown. In 1821 the first volume of The idle man was published. It was unprofitable, and Mr. Dana dropped it. In it he published stories and essays from his own pen. In the same year he contributed to the New York Review (then under the care of Mr. Bryant) his first poem of much pretension, The dying raven. In 1827 his most celebrated poetical production, The buccaneer, was published, with some minor poems. Of that production Wilson, of Blackwood's magazine, wrote, It is by far the most powerful and original of American poetical
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Danforth, Thomas, 1622-1699 (search)
Danforth, Thomas, 1622-1699 Colonial governor; born in Suffolk, England, in 1622; settled in New England in 1634; was an assistant under the governor of Massachusetts in 1659-78; became deputy governor in 1679; during the same year was elected president of the province of Maine; and was also a judge of the Superior Court, in which capacity he strongly condemned the action of the court in the witchcraft excitement of 1692. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 5, 1699.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Day, or Daye, Stephen 1611-1668 (search)
Day, or Daye, Stephen 1611-1668 The first printer in the English-American colonies; born in London in 1611; went to Massachusetts in 1638, and was employed to manage the printing-press sent out by Rev. Mr. Glover. He began printing at Cambridge in March, 1639. He was not a skilful workman, and was succeeded in the management, about 1648, by Samuel Green, who employed Day as a journeyman. He died at Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 22, 1668. Day, or Daye, Stephen 1611-1668 The first printer in the English-American colonies; born in London in 1611; went to Massachusetts in 1638, and was employed to manage the printing-press sent out by Rev. Mr. Glover. He began printing at Cambridge in March, 1639. He was not a skilful workman, and was succeeded in the management, about 1648, by Samuel Green, who employed Day as a journeyman. He died at Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 22, 1668.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Deane, Charles, 1813-1889 (search)
Deane, Charles, 1813-1889 Historian; born in Biddeford, Me., Nov. 10, 1813; became a member of the chief historical societies of the country; author of Some notices of Samuel Gorton; First Plymouth patent; Bibliography of Governor Hutchinson's publications; Wingfield's discourse of Virginia; Smith's true relation; and editor of Bradford's history of Plymouth plantation, etc. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 13, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dearborn, Henry, 1751- (search)
Dearborn, Henry, 1751- Military officer; born in Northampton, N. H., Feb. 23, 1751; became a physician, and employed his leisure time in the study of military science. At the head of sixty volunteers he hastened to Cambridge on the day after the affair at Lexington, a distance of 65 miles. He was appointed a captain in Stark's regiment, participated in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in September following (1775) accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. He participated in the siege of Quebec, and was made prisoner, but was paroled in May, 1776, when he became major of Scammel's New Hampshire regiment. He was in the battles of Stillwater and Saratoga in the fall of 1777, and led the troops in those engagements—in the latter as lieutenant-colonel. He was in the battle of Monmouth, was in Sullivan's campaign against the Indians in 1779, and in 1781 was attached to Washington's staff as deputy quartermastergeneral, with the rank of colonel. In that capacity he served in th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doolittle, Amos 1754-1832 (search)
Doolittle, Amos 1754-1832 Engraver; born in Cheshire, Conn., in 1754; was self-educated; served an apprenticeship with a silversmith; and established himself as an engraver on copper in 1775. While a volunteer in the camp at Cambridge (1775) he visited the scene of the skirmish at Lexington and made a drawing and engraving of the affair, which furnishes the historian with the only correct representation of the buildings around the Green at that time. He afterwards made other historical prints of the time. He died in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 31, 1832.
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