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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Chapel Hill, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) or search for Chapel Hill, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
of a conference to bring about a suspension of hostilities, had been taken by ex-Governor David L. Swain, one of the best and most distinguished men of the State, who had been for thirty years President of the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill. So early as the 8th of April, when news of the evacuation of Richmond and Petersburg had caused universal gloom, President Swain addressed a note to ex-Governor William A. Graham who was a member of the Confederate Congress, proposing actionbetween the armies they respectively commanded, and that he was willing to hold a conference. He said he would limit the advance of his main column, the next day, to Morrisville, a little west of Raleigh, and the, cavalry to the University at Chapel Hill, with the expectation that Johnston would also maintain the position of his forces then held, until each had notice of a failure to agree. He further said that, as a basis of action, he would undertake to abide by the terms and conditions mad