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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1 1 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The following is the correspondence between the two rival candidates for the United States Senate: (search)
gfield. A. L. Mr. Douglas to Mr. Lincoln. Bement, Piatt Co., Ill., July 30, 1858. Dear Sir: Your letter, dated yesterday, accepting my proposition for a joint discussion at one prominent point in each Congressional District, as stated in my previous letter, was received this morning. The times and places designated are as follows: Ottawa, La Salle CountyAugust 21st, 1858. Freeport, Stephenson CountryAugust 27th, 1858. Jonesboro, Union CountySeptember 15th, 1858. Charleston, Coles CountySeptember 18th, 1858. Galesburgh, Knox CountyOctober 7th, 1858. Quincy, Adams CountyOctober 13th, 1858. Alton, Madison CountyOctober 15th, 1858. I agree to your suggestion that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport, you shall open the discussion and speak one hour, I will follow for an hour and a half, and you can then reply for ha
ot want to see him elected. I was afraid that something would happen to him, and when he came down to see me, after he was elected President, I still felt, and my heart told me, that something would befall Abe, and that I should never see him again. Abe and his father are in heaven now, I am sure, and I expect soon to go there and meet them. and spent an entire day with her. She was then living on the farm her stepson had purchased and given her, eight miles south of the town of Charleston, in Illinois. She died on the 10th of April, 1869. The two sets of children in the Lincoln household — to their credit be it said — lived together in perfect accord. Abe was in his tenth year, and his stepmother, awake to the importance of an education, made a way for him to attend school. To her he seemed full of promise; and although not so quick of comprehension as other boys, yet she believed in encouraging his every effort. He had had a few weeks of schooling under Riney and Hazel i
March 28. A riot occurred .at Charleston, Illinois, in which several persons were killed and wounded.--(Doc. 136.) The election, ordered by Major-General Banks, for delegates to the Constitutional Convention of Louisiana, was held, and resulted in the success of the Free State party. Two rebel spies were captured in the navy-yard at Mound City, Arkansas, this morning.--an express train, which left Louisville, Ky., this morning, for Lebanon, was captured by a body of guerrillas, and two of the cars were burned. A guard of seventeen National soldiers on the train surrendered without firing a gun.
rleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 17. James H. Morgan (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He joined the Colorado in May, 1861; volunteered for the United States steamer Mississippi; was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans; was on board the Ironsides at Charleston. Joined the Richmond in October, 1863. 18. John Smith, second, (Captain of Top,) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Varuna when she was sunk by the rebel vessels, after having passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip; was transferred to the Brooklyn; and was in the action with the batteries below Vicksburgh. He joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 19. Jame
solute spirit of the people soon rose superior to the temporary despondency naturally resulting from these reverses. The gallant troops so ably commanded in the States beyond the Mississippi, inflicted repeated defeats on the invading armies in Louisiana and on the coast of Texas. Detachments of troops and active bodies of partisans kept up so effective a war on the Mississippi River as practically to destroy its value as an avenue of commerce. The determined and successful defence of Charleston against the joint land and naval oprations of the enemy, afforded an inspiring example of our ability to repel the attacks even of the iron-clad fleet, on which they chiefly rely, while on the Northern frontier our success was still more marked. The able commander who conducted the campaign in Virginia determined to meet the threatened advance on Richmond — for which the enemy had made long and costly preparations — by forcing their armies to cross the Potomac and fight in defence of th
llowing extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and Britannia. Also, under date of the seventeenth, Captain
-day is on half-rations of beef, and I fear within a few days will have nothing but bread to eat. This is truly a dark hour with us, and I cannot see what is to be done. All that is left for us to do is to do all we can, and then we will have a clear conscience, no matter what the world may say. Major Locke, Chief Commissary of Georgia, wrote: I pray you, Major, to put every agency in motion that you can to send cattle without a moment's delay toward the Georgia borders. The troops in Charleston are in great extremity. We look alone to you for cattle; those in Georgia are exhausted. Major Guerin, Chief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of the last importance, at this time, that the troops here should be subsisted. Again, he says: As it is, our situation is full of danger, from want of meat, and extraordinary efforts are required to prevent disaster. And on the ninth of October, he says: We have now forty thousand troo
against us. The exploit above alluded to happened near Winfield, about twelve days since. Major Nonning was on a scout with a portion of the command, and entered Winfield about midnight, when he ascertained that the steamer Levi, bound for Charleston, lay on the opposite side of the river. Lieutenant Verdigan, with a solitary companion, was despatched across the river to reconnoitre, which was successfully accomplished, and the telegraphic communication with Charleston severed in front of Charleston severed in front of a house, and in full view of a woman residing therein. In about two hours Lieutenant Verdigan was reenforced by nine men, who had crossed the river under many difficulties, on account of the scarcity of water craft. It was soon discovered that the enemy were on the alert, and were about to cut loose from the shore. Not a moment was to be lost. The Lieutenant gave the order, Forward! and immediately the gallant eleven double-quicked it to the boat, dashed aboard, up into the ladies' cabin, a
Doc. 136.-affair at Charleston, ill. Charleston plain-dealer account. Charleston, ill., March 28--9 P. M. this afternoon a dreadful affair took place in our town, the most shocking in its details that has ever occurred in our part of the State. Early in the morning, squads of copperheads came in town from various dCharleston plain-dealer account. Charleston, ill., March 28--9 P. M. this afternoon a dreadful affair took place in our town, the most shocking in its details that has ever occurred in our part of the State. Early in the morning, squads of copperheads came in town from various directions, and, as the sequel will show, armed and determined upon summary vengeance upon our soldiers. During the day, premonitions of the coming trouble were too evident. Some of the soldiers, about to return to their regiments, were somewhat excited by liquor, and consequently rather boisterous, but not belligerent — were morCharleston, ill., March 28--9 P. M. this afternoon a dreadful affair took place in our town, the most shocking in its details that has ever occurred in our part of the State. Early in the morning, squads of copperheads came in town from various directions, and, as the sequel will show, armed and determined upon summary vengeance upon our soldiers. During the day, premonitions of the coming trouble were too evident. Some of the soldiers, about to return to their regiments, were somewhat excited by liquor, and consequently rather boisterous, but not belligerent — were more disposed for fun than fight. About four o'clock, a soldier, Oliver Sallee, stepped up to Nelson Wells, who has been regarded as the leader of the copperheads in this county, and placing his hand good-naturedly against him, playfully asked him if there were any butternuts in town? Wells replied, Yes, I am one! and drawing his
Clark, Governor of Mississippi. T. H. Watts, Governor of Alabama. T. B. Vance, Governor of North-Carolina. Correspondence. Executive Department, Milledgeville, May 9, 1864. I have purchased thirty thousand soldiers' blankets for the State of Georgia, now in the Islands, and have to send out cotton to pay for them. The steamer Little Ada, chartered by the State, has been loaded for three weeks with about three hundred bales of cotton ready for sea. She lies thirty miles from Charleston. I ask clearance for her to go out now, while we have dark nights. She is detained at heavy expense to the State. I solicit an early reply. Joseph E. Brown. His Excellency Jefferson Davis, Richmond. Richmond, May 10, 1864. His Excellency Governor Brown: Your telegram of the ninth to the President in relation to steamer Ada, has been referred to this department. On the twelfth of April a telegram was sent you, stating that the act of Congress, imposing restrictions on export of cot
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