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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., From Moultrie to Sumter. (search)
From Moultrie to Sumter. Abner Doubleday, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A., Retired. View lieved that in the event of an outbreak from Charleston few of us would survive; but it did not greapply of provisions to Fort Johnson, opposite Charleston. He was instructed when the secession patrohirty men were embarked I went straight for Fort Sumter. It was getting dusk. I made slow work inofficers, after their successful transit to Fort Sumter, went back to Moultrie in small boats to prrris was a spirited old man. He had lived at Charleston most of his life and knew the South Carolinit gun on our side in reply to the attack on Fort Sumter. Sure that we would all be tasked to thflict, although it was undoubtedly aimed at Fort Sumter. Edmund Ruffin of Virginia is usually credy to New York. With the first shot against Sumter the whole North became united. Mobs went abou occurred soon after. Sumter. Guard-boat. Charleston. Castle Pinckney. Moultrie. Major Anderso[21 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
r of Major Anderson's command from Moultrie to Sumter was neatly executed early in the evening of Des: fifteen twenty minutes more carried them to Sumter. The workmen had just settled down to an evenr on the parade, for the purpose of shelling Charleston should that become advisable. A mortar plat yards away, was the nearest terra firma to Fort Sumter, and there the enemy would plant his most ivice. It was expected that the walls of Fort Sumter would be able to withstand the guns which whough we thought it quite satisfactory. The Charleston newspapers described the effect of the infertteries; the accidental solid shot fired at Fort Sumter by an impatient secessionist in the CummingSullivan's Island to command the left flank of Sumter. Captain Doubleday divided his men into three the line of fire, to witness the duel between Sumter and Moultrie. Doubleday's men were not in thehad been confirmed, and that we would leave Fort Sumter the following day; which we did, after salu[30 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
t other places, looking to the reduction of Fort Sumter if it should become necessary; meantime lea, the commander of the Confederate forces at Charleston, in obedience to the command of his Governmeollows: Do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter. If Major Anderson will state the time at th Carolina, 1861. from a photograph. Fort Sumter, S. C., April 12, 1861, 3:20 A. M. Sir: By aft him a few moments before on the wharf at Fort Sumter. Captain James would allow no one else but ut daylight, the boat with the aides reached Charleston, and they reported to General Beauregard. of the second expedition for the relief of Fort Sumter, were the Baltic (no guns), the Pawnee (8 9 and which were now accepted. Thus fell Fort Sumter, April 13th, 1861. At this time fire was sthe United States flag, and to be carried Fort Sumter after the bombardment, from a sketch made ial Beauregard, of the batteries surrounding Fort Sumter were: Sullivan's Island, Brigadier-Gene[14 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. (search)
Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. A. R. Chisolm, Colonel, C. S. A. Very soon after Major Robert Anderson moved with his command into Fort Sumter from Fort Moultrie, Governor Francis W. Pickens sent James Fraserns, to me at my plantation, fifty miles south of Charleston, with the request that I would assist with my neg report to General Beauregard. Having visited Fort Sumter five times under a flag of truce, and once after romise himself. The facts of the surrender of Fort Sumter to ex-Senator Wigfall are these: General Beauregain extinguishing the fire. I passed down between Fort Sumter and our batteries; delivering my dispatches, I volunteered to go to Fort Sumter, which offer was accepted. Colonel Wigfall, of Texas, volunteered to accompanyfleet. My duty often required that I should pass Fort Sumter and our guard-boats at night to visit Hartstene, rtstene was well aware how easy it was to pass to Fort Sumter and expressed to me his uneasiness on this point;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., War preparations in the North. (search)
t at Montgomery, had not wholly destroyed the hope that some peaceful way out of our troubles would be found; yet the gathering of an army on the sands opposite Fort Sumter was really war, and if a hostile gun were fired, we knew it would mean the end of all effort at arrangement. Hoping almost against hope that blood would not bee in from the lobby in an excited way, and, catching the chairman's eye, exclaimed, Mr. President, the telegraph announces that the secessionists are bombarding Fort Sumter! There was a solemn and painful hush, but it was broken in a moment by a woman's shrill voice from the spectators' seats, crying, Glory to God! It startled evt; but many of these should be credited with the same patriotic impulse, and it made them nobly oblivious of party consistency. A few days after the surrender of Sumter, Stephen A. Douglas passed through Columbus on his way to Washington, and, in response to the calls of a spontaneous gathering of people, spoke to them from the w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
on in December, as a commissioner to treat for the evacuation of Fort Sumter, he had committed himself to Mr. Davis. At any rate, he was zealous. Colonel Keitt afterward stated to the writer and others in Charleston that William L. Yancey, member of the Confederate Senate, Confee vote of B. F. Butler and others at the Democratic convention at Charleston, in 1860, were confirmatory of the newspaper report. As late as Governor Gist from drawing the money and procuring the arms. In Charleston he was known as an active friend of the preschool system and orph submitted to the Government through a partner of Mr. Prioleau in Charleston, Mr. George A. Trenholm, who forwarded the proposition by his sonf the Florida, may be mentioned. In May, after the reduction of Fort Sumter, Maffit came from Washington to offer his services, and when he exposure, performing the duties of a private in the Home Guard at Charleston. The reason alleged for not accepting more men was the want of a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
d at the Exchange Hotel in Richmond on the night of April 16th, 1861. Ex-Governor Henry A. Wise was at the head of this purely impromptu affair. The Virginia Secession Convention, then sitting, was by a large majority Union in its sentiment till Sumter was fired on and captured, and Mr. Lincoln called for seventy-five thousand men to enforce the laws in certain Southern States. Virginia was then, as it were, forced to take sides, and she did not hesitate. I had been one of the candidates for nt of the Virginia Central railroad, and John S. Barbour, president of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap railroads, were sent for, and joined us at the hotel near midnight. They agreed to put the The Palmetto regiment parading in Charleston, S. C., en route for Richmond. From a sketch. necessary trains in readiness next day to obey any request of Governor Letcher for the movement of troops. A committee, of which I was chairman, waited on Governor Letcher after midnight, and, aro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
pril 15th, convening Congress and calling forth 75,000 three-months militia to suppress combinations against the Government. The Federal situation was alarming. Sumter fell on the 13th of April, and was evacuated on the 14th. Virginia seceded on the 17th, and seized Harper's Ferry on the 18th and the Norfolk Navy Yard on the 20ding the greater resources of the North, which produced their effect only as the contest was prolonged. Irwin McDowell. After the firing of the first gun upon Sumter, the two sides were equally active in marshaling their forces on a line along the border States from the Atlantic coast of Virginia in the east to Kansas in the wGeneral Scott was in chief command of the Union forces, with McDowell south of the Potomac, confronted by his old classmate, Beauregard, hot from the capture of Fort Sumter. Map of the vicinity of Washington, July, 1861. General Patterson, of Pennsylvania, a veteran of the war of 1812 and the war with Mexico, was in command
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ernor then came to St. Louis to concert with General D. M. Frost (who commanded a small brigade of volunteer militia) measures for seizing the arsenal in the name of the State. While the matter was still under consideration the bombardment of Fort Sumter took place, and the President called for 75,000 troops to support the Government. To his call upon Missouri for her quota of such troops, the Governor replied that the requisition was, in his opinion, illegal, unconstitutional, and revolutionopposed under all circumstances to the secession of Missouri, but just as earnestly opposed to the invasion and conquest of the South by the Federal Government. To that position he still adhered even when Mr. Lincoln, after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, had called for troops with which to repossess the Federal forts and enforce the laws of the Union within the seceded States. But considering Lyon's attack upon the State militia and his killing peaceable citizens an unparalleled insult and w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
ork still remained to be done before their completion. They were finished and accepted. January 15th, 1862, and put in commission the next day. The delay was in part due to lack of funds and in part to the necessity of alteration in the design of the vessels. Had they been completed in the time specified, the Mississippi campaign, from Island Number10 to Vicksburg, would probably have been over before Farragut passed the forts at New Orleans. Editors. Soon after the surrender of Fort Sumter, while in St. Louis, I received a letter from Attorney-General Bates, dated Washington, April 17th, in which he said: Be not surprised if you are called here suddenly by telegram. If called, come instantly. In a certain contingency it will be necessary to have the aid of the most thorough knowledge of our Western rivers and the use of steam on them, and in that event I have advised that you should be consulted. The call by telegraph followed close upon the letter. I hurried to Washin
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