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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 103 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 46 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 40 4 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) or search for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Chapter 56: journey to Charlotte. Darkness seemed now to close swiftly over the Confederacy, and about a week before the evacuation of Richmond, Mr. Davis came to me and gently, but decidedly, announced the necessity for our departure. He saito the unknown. Mr. Burton N. Harrison, the President's private secretary, was to protect and see us safely settled in Charlotte, where we had hired a furnished house. Mr. George A. Trenholm's lovely daughters were also to accompany us to remain wable and wealthy citizen of that place invited me to rest with his family, but we gratefully declined and proceeded to Charlotte. The baggage cars were all needing repairs and leaked badly. Our bedding was wet through by the constant rains thart, which has borne his goodness in grateful memory for twenty-five years. Mr. Harrison, after seeing us safely established in Charlotte, fearing he might be separated from Mr. Davis, and hoping to be of use, set out for Richmond to rejoin him.
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 62: leaving Charlotte.—The rumors of surrender. (search)
Chapter 62: leaving Charlotte.—The rumors of surrender. As time wore on all the news we received was of that kind which is reputed to travel fast, but did not over the broken railways, and tangeadful rumor that General Lee was retreating, and the President and his cabinet were coming to Charlotte to meet General Johnston and his army. I felt then that I must obey Mr. Davis's solemn chargeks, escorted by the midshipmen under the accomplished and gallant Captain Parker, came through Charlotte; and as among the escort were my brother Jefferson and Mr. Davis's grandnephew, and there seemin the preliminary arrangements for surrender. He also informed me of Mr. Davis's arrival in Charlotte, and of the announcement made to him there of the assassination of Mr. Lincoln. I burst into ows, which he had received from Mr. Davis, who had asked him to join and take care of us. Charlotte, N. C., April 24, 1865. B. N. Harrison, Chester, S. C. The hostile Government reject the propos
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. (search)
g that Sherman had agreed to a conference, and asking that the Secretary of War, General Breckinridge, should return to co-operate in it. When we arrived at Charlotte, on April 18, 1865, we received a telegram announcing the assassination of President Lincoln. A vindictive policy was speedily substituted for his, which avowedll anybody, and certainly not a little girl like you. The child was soon pacified. I shall never forget the kindly expression of the President's face. At Charlotte, on the 18th, I saw him again, on the day following the assassination of Mr. Lincoln. The news had reached Charlotte, but was not credited. Somehow we learCharlotte, but was not credited. Somehow we learned that General Breckinridge would be on the train that afternoon, and with several other Kentuckians I went to the depot. His first desire was to see the President, so we went with him to Mr. Davis. We found him sitting in a chair in the door which opened on the sidewalk. After shaking hands with General Breckinridge, he asked
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 64: capture of President Davis, as written by himself. (search)
apter 64: capture of President Davis, as written by himself. After the expiration of the armistice I rode out of Charlotte, attended by all but two members of my cabinet, my personal staff, and the cavalry that had been concentrated from diffning unmolested, and the troops inclined to accept those terms. Had General Johnston obeyed the order sent to him from Charlotte, and moved on the route selected by himself, with all his cavalry, so much of the infantry as could be mounted, and thertillery, he could not have been successfully pursued by General Sherman. His force, united to that I had assembled at Charlotte, would have been sufficient to vanquish any troops which the enemy had between us and the Mississippi River. Had the cavalry with which I left Charlotte been associated with a force large enough to inspire hope for the future, instead of being discouraged by the surrender of their rear, it would probably have gone on, and, when united with the forces of Maury, F
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
received subsequently by Colonel Anderson, directed me to send this money to the President, at Charlotte. This order was not obeyed, however. As only the military part of our Government had then anurs truly, Archer Anderson. Mr. Davis wrote: Not recollecting to have met Colonel Mason at Charlotte, I wrote him, asking what was the fact. Receiving no reply, I renewed the inquiry, but thoughstructions that he deliver it in person to Mr. Davis and being a reply. Colonel Mason went to Charlotte, delivered the letter to Mr. Davis, but beyond a telegraphic acknowledgment to me that the le. I have no doubt that General Beauregard's estimate was within bounds. After Mr. Davis left Charlotte and moved South, a Confederate officer told me that, while standing near a bridge crossing a ce my connection with the Confederate Treasury. The President from Danville proceeded to Charlotte, N. C. We arrived at Abbeville, S. C., the morning of May 2d. At Abbeville, S. C., the Treasury o