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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 103 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 46 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 40 4 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) or search for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
ce, or count the cost in life, or bother their brains about the great rivers to be crossed, and the food required for man and beast, that had to be gathered by the way. There was a devil-may-care feeling pervading officers and men, that made me feel the full load of responsibility, for success would be accepted as a matter of course, whereas, should we fail, this march would be adjudged the wild adventure of a crazy fool. I had no purpose to march direct for Richmond by way of Augusta and Charlotte, but always designed to reach the sea-coast first at Savannah or Port Royal, South Carolina, and even kept in mind the alternative of Pensacola. The first night out we camped by the road-side near Lithonia. Stone Mountain, a mass of granite, was in plain view, cut out in clear outline against the blue sky; the whole horizon was lurid with the bonfires of rail-ties, and groups of men all night were carrying the heated rails to the nearest trees, and bending them around the trunks. Colo
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
t, and to move up to Lancaster, to make believe we were bound for Charlotte, to which point I heard that Beauregard had directed all his deta immediately opposing us. Of course, I had no purpose of going to Charlotte, for the right wing was already moving rapidly toward Fayettevillon's cavalry, keeping up the delusion that we proposed to move on Charlotte and Salisbury, but with orders to watch the progress of the Fourtr movements, and that consequently they were still scattered from Charlotte around to Florence, then behind us. Having thus secured the passan, from Columbia down to Kingsville on the Wateree, and up toward Charlotte as far as the Chester line; thence we turned east on Cheraw and F Keep everybody busy, and let Stoneman push toward Greensboroa or Charlotte from Knoxville; even a feint in that quarter will be most important. The railroad from Charlotte to Danville is all that is left to the enemy, and it will not do for me to go there, on account of the red
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
o prevent a retreat southward. On the 13th, early, I entered Raleigh, and ordered the several heads of column toward Ashville, in the direction of Salisbutry or Charlotte. Before reaching Raleigh, a locomotive came down the road to meet me, passing through both Wade Hampton's and Kilpatrick's cavalry, bringing four gentlemen, wit position of the enemy at the Company's shops in rear of Haw River Bridge, and at Greensboroa, and to cut off his only available line of retreat by Salisbury and Charlotte: 1. General Kilpatrick will keep up a show of pursuit in the direction of Hillsboroa and Graham, but be ready to cross Haw River on General Howard's bridge, n was going to meet General Johnston, and volunteered to say that he hoped I would succeed in obtaining his surrender, as the whole army dreaded the long march to Charlotte (one hundred and seventy-five miles), already begun, but which had been interrupted by the receipt of General Johnston's letter of the 13th. We reached Durham's