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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 53 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 178 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 81 27 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 47 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) or search for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 6 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Exchange of prisoners. (search)
anybody's credence. This extract from Hitchcock's report, however, discloses one thing, which was really the prime cause of all the difficulties connected with the detention and exchange of prisoners, civil and military, to wit: an unwillingness to recognize the equality of the belligerents. Pray, how, upon any other theory than that of equality, can a cartel be framed or executed? On the 26th of July, 1863, General John H. Morgan and his command were captured. They were carried to Cincinnati, and from thence, by General Burnside's order, he and twenty-eight of his officers were sent to the penitentiary at Columbus, where they were shaved and their hair cut very close by a negro convict. They were then marched to the bath-room and scrubbed, and thence to their cells. Seven days afterward forty-two more of General Morgan's officers were sent from Johnson's Island to the penitentiary, and subjected to the same indignities. On the 30th of July, 1863, I was informed by the Fede
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
f events, their only refuge is in the indulgence of a desperate hope, whose alternative is despair and madness. There were, it is true, occasional breaks in the heavy monotone of time and things. One of these was the sinking of the gunboat Cincinnati, on May 26th. With notable audacity this vessel attempted to run suddenly upon and close with the batteries at the north end of the city, which were manned by a gallant command of Tennesseeans, and constituted the protection of the garrison's extreme left wing. As soon as she began steaming down the river, and even before she had passed the bend, the Cincinnati became the target of a concentrated and powerful cannonade, which was made none the less steady and effective by the Federals' own heavy fire. Before she reached the middle of the stream it was evident that her vitals were wounded. Reversing her course, she steamed heavily up the current, but only succeeded in running ashore on the west bank, a little above the extremity of
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. (search)
d river, the crossing of the Ohio, the march past Cincinnati, and, if compelled to attempt it, the recrossing , and urged his march rapidly in the direction of Cincinnati. He had learned the fact that Burnside was in thton and Dayton Railroad, and between Hamilton and Cincinnati. He believed that if he could elude this danger Indiana and Ohio line, and twenty-five miles from Cincinnati, he dispatched a strong detachment in the directito have reached Burnside, he pressed directly for Cincinnati. In a few hours the detachment which had maneuvrnt there the greater part of the troops posted at Cincinnati and in the vicinity. Hoping, although, of course, not knowing, that this could be done, and that Cincinnati would be left with a garrison no stronger than thelive I shall never forget that night march around Cincinnati. We had now been almost constantly in motion for and that they had been brought by the river from Cincinnati to Pomeroy. He knew that if the boats could pass
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
conditions. General Lee was thrown from his balance (as is shown by the statement of General Fitzhugh Lee) by too great confidence in the prowess of his troops and (as is shown by General Anderson's statement) by the deplorable absence of General Stuart and the perplexity occasioned thereby. With this preface I proceed to say that the Gettysburg campaign was weak in these points-adhering, however, to my opinion that a combined movement against Rosecrans, in Tennessee, and a march toward Cincinnati would have given better results than could possibly have been secured by the invasion of Pennsylvania: First, the offensive strategical, but defensive tactical, plan of the campaign, as agreed upon, should never have been abandoned after we entered the enemy's country. Second, if there ever was a time when the abandonment of that plan could have promised decisive results, it was at Brandy Station, where, after Stuart had repulsed the force thrown across the river, we might have fallen on
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The War's Carnival of fraud. (search)
cords of Congress, a comprehensive idea of the swindling, greater or less, that the necessities of our government obliged it to submit to. But of the Quartermaster's Department I am as competent, perhaps, as any one else to speak. On the 5th of August, 1863, I received an order to inspect the Quartermaster and Commissary Departments of the Military Department of the Ohio, which included the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. Major General Burnside was in command, with headquarters at Cincinnati. Upon reporting there my first care was to cause to be prepared by the chief quartermaster a complete list of all contracts awarded within a certain period, with the names of the bidders at each letting. With this as a guide it was a simple matter to learn what fraud had been practiced, for I had only to direct my orderlies to serve a summons upon each disappointed bidder to report at headquarters and testify, when the whole chicanery was invariably exposed. The regular dealers and resp
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Railroad. (search)
mmanded the Department of the Ohio, with headquarters at Cincinnati. On the 10th of June it was announced in general orderept us, and that they had been brought by the river from Cincinnati to Pomeroy. Judah's command arrived at Pomeroy about that a large infantry force had been sent by river from Cincinnati to intercept him, first at Pomeroy, and, failing there, d on duty. The next day I had to put up with a squad of Cincinnati militia — who arrived on the 20th-as guards for a large Duke's eye. None of our regular infantry came above Cincinnati, and the few militia who found their way so far as Buffich younger in appearance, accompanied General Judah from Cincinnati as a volunteer aid. Major McCook was the father of the that carried General Judah and staff from Buffington to Cincinnati were one hundred and thirteen Confederate officers. Amolip, and all watched him intently. When the boat neared Cincinnati, a patrol was sent below with orders to clear the main d