hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 53 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 178 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 81 27 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 47 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) or search for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
were met by greater bravery, skill and metal, and were being badly worsted. Capt. Davis, on the flag-ship Benton, directed every movement of our fleet with the sagacity and style of a veteran in naval warfare. He made no mistakes. Not a boat was moved but with fearful effect upon the enemy. Did the Carondolet put her bows up-stream, it was to let fly her stern guns; did the Cairo turn about, it was that a broadside might give its destruction to the foe. The Mound City, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and the old war-horse Benton were each and all diligent and effective, while the Conestoga (wooden) lay off at a safe distance and made good use of her long-range guns. The cannonading was fearful and its reverberations most grand and terrible. The noise was almost like one continuous report, while the broad river was covered with a dense volume of smoke that for a time completely enveloped both fleets and hid them from view. It was at this time that a report, louder and more distant
half. He was, of course, satisfied of the evacuation, and determined upon landing early in the morning. Thursday, June 5. Early this morning the fleet got under way, and by sunrise our flag was waving from the heights of Fort Pillow. The rams under Col. Ellet, anxious, probably, to secure an equivocal notoriety in being the first to land in an abandoned fortress, proceeded with all speed down the bend, followed by the Benton and her gallant followers — Mound City, Cairo, Carondelet, Cincinnati, St. Louis and the transports and mortarfleet — until we had rounded the Craighead Point, so long the slice which separated us from the rebels. The approach is by a long and complete curve, in which the river runs, as at Columbus, right into the Chickasaw bluff, where the stream suddenly narrows until it becomes from two miles wide to nearly half a mile at the Fulton landing, just below the forts. The yellow sand bluff rises to the height of a hundred and fifty feet, and in general app
d. The rams Monarch and Lancaster No. Three are also in pursuit of the prize, but arrive too late, the tug having already nailed her. It appears that the captain, as soon as he landed the boat, together with several others of the crew, jumped ashore, and made tracks for the tall timber. One of the pilots, who says his name is Lewis, after going on shore at his own request was permitted to return to the boat. Lewis says he resides near Memphis. The engineer is E. A. Honness, formerly of Cincinnati. He was found at his engines, assisted by a negro, and pumping water into the boilers. His conduct indicating he was all right, he was permitted to remain in charge of the machinery. After a few minutes' detention, in placing George P. Lord, one of the Benton's Masters in charge, the Sovereign was rounded out and proceeded with our flotilla down the Mississippi. Honness was formerly engineer on the Acacia. Capt. Baird, formerly of the Admiral, Republic, and old Sultana, was in charge
of her chimneys being out of sight. The Clara Dolsen is a capital prize, being one of the largest and best business steamers on our waters. She was built at Cincinnati, fifteen months ago, and has capacity for over sixteen hundred tons. She is worth forty thousand dollars, being in excellent condition. Her officers state thatut was on her way to a new hiding-place up St. Francis River — so her officers state. Capt. J. Riley Jones, who purchased the A. W. Quarrier and Gen. Pike in Cincinnati, before the rebellion, is in command of the Clara Dolsen. A man named Nixon (who has a brother piloting one of our gunboats) is one of the Clara's pilots. Rees Townsend, of St. Louis, who run the blockade from that city, is the chief engineer. The Dolsen is partially owned in Cincinnati, where the bulk of her building bills, we understand, remain unpaid. The Clara now lies alongside of us. She has a large supply of wood on board, a portion of which is being transferred to our gunbo
est, not many could find wherewith to appease hunger, and mind as well as body was afflicted. Both were jaded and reduced. Losses we were obliged to estimate. Official reports there were none. Of material, Fitz-John Porter's command lost twenty pieces of artillery, and the arms, with accoutrements, which belonged to men who were lost. Of dead, wounded and missing, there were seven thousand or upwards. Col. Edmund Pendleton, of a Louisiana regiment, (Col. Pendleton formerly resided in Cincinnati,) who was captured on Monday, (June thirtieth,) assured me that on that day the rebels captured four thousand five hundred prisoners. Our dead he estimated, from examination of the field, at three hundred. Of the wounded there is no account. It is reported that the rebel loss is still more awful. It is claimed that the battle was badly managed. This is no time for criticism; besides, the data is not absolutely reliable. It is certain we were beaten in strategy and in grand tactics.
f Newport, fifty men; Capt. J. J. Wright, of Cincinnati, forty men; Capt. Pepper, of Bracken County,artillery squad, under Capt. W. H. Glass, of Cincinnati; amounting in the aggregate to about three hkins, Captain Lafe Wilson, young Hartburn of Cincinnati, and others; besides many, including F. L. SMcClintock, John McClintock, Thomas Barry of Cincinnati, and Thos. J. Vimont, who fell severely wounEighteenth Kentucky; Captain J. J. Wright of Cincinnati, and others, not now remembered, to any one uards; Wm. S. Shipman, do.; Thomas Hartburn, Cincinnati, Pendleton Guards. wounded.--Capt. S. G. eventh Kentucky cavalry, back; Thomas Barry, Cincinnati artillery, right thigh; L. A. Funk, heel; Cander great obligations to the companies from Cincinnati, Newport and Bracken county, Ky., under Captt ten o'clock Saturday night, and arrived at Cincinnati next morning at four. The young men of my, who all seemed anxious to show kindness to Cincinnati men. The guns we took with us proved to be n
e comfort to those suffering from their wounds, (nearly all of whom of the Fifth Ohio are from Cincinnati,) than could be accomplished by my devoting that time to writing, and by that means furnish youbtless overlooked. When those duties were done, the regiment took up its line of march for Cincinnati, at four o'clock P. M., with which incidents I believe you are conversant. This report woul Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Ninety-fifth Regiment. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Korff. Cincinnati, September 5, 1862. To His Excellency Oliver P. Morton, Governor of the State of Indiana: Tup. Thus was the Federal army defeated at Richmond. Jim R. S. Cox. Another account. Cincinnati, Sept. 5, 1862. On my return to the city this morning, I find that the interest which might reported to Gen. Rosecrans. The Eleventh Ohio battery, under command of Lieutenant Sears, of Cincinnati, was halted upon the road. The Fifth Iowa had filed past it, and was taking a position on the
this occasion to state, that should my account of the two hours fighting not reach your city as soon as some others, I base my apology on the fact of remaining with the surgeons during the night, and rendering the poor wounded soldiers all the assistance within my limited means. Thinking that this course on this occasion would be appreciated, and give greater satisfaction to the friends, and more comfort to those suffering from their wounds, (nearly all of whom of the Fifth Ohio are from Cincinnati,) than could be accomplished by my devoting that time to writing, and by that means furnish your readers with the news one day earlier. The enemy were very severely punished, as we have learned from prisoners who were captured this morning. They state that our artillery mowed them down whenever they showed themselves to view; and that while they were in the open field they were dropped by scores. They state their loss at over one thousand. They have been very quiet to-day, showing th
lture for our dead comrades before departure, and which you had doubtless overlooked. When those duties were done, the regiment took up its line of march for Cincinnati, at four o'clock P. M., with which incidents I believe you are conversant. This report would not have been made — it did not need making, so far as the furnionce forgot that they were gentlemen, ever. J. B. Armstrong, Late Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Ninety-fifth Regiment. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Korff. Cincinnati, September 5, 1862. To His Excellency Oliver P. Morton, Governor of the State of Indiana: The first brigade of the army of Kentucky, to which the Sixty-ninthly disabled him. He finally crawled to the fence and gave himself up. Thus was the Federal army defeated at Richmond. Jim R. S. Cox. Another account. Cincinnati, Sept. 5, 1862. On my return to the city this morning, I find that the interest which might otherwise attach to a detailed account of the battles fought near
, and comfort to the enemy, his house was ordered to be sacked and burned to the ground. At this point, the right wing of the Twenty-sixth Missouri regiment was thrown out as skirmishers, to relieve those of the Fifth Iowa regiment. It was not until about four o'clock P. M. that our skirmishers came upon the main body of the enemy drawn up in line of battle to a frightful depth. This fact was reported to Gen. Rosecrans. The Eleventh Ohio battery, under command of Lieutenant Sears, of Cincinnati, was halted upon the road. The Fifth Iowa had filed past it, and was taking a position on the right of the road in line of battle. The Twenty-sixth was just filing past in two ranks, when a rebel battery, concealed by the trees and thick brush, opened upon us with canister from the left of the road. Our battery was immediately put in position on the right of the road near a small unoccupied house, the Fifth Iowa supporting the right, and the Forty-eighth Indiana the left. The left wing
1 2