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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 35 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 52 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 47 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 35 29 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 25 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Cleveland (Ohio, United States) or search for Cleveland (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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higs should go over to the Free Soil party: It would only be a change of name; the principles would still be the same. But there would be one change which, I admit, would be monstrous — it would make Mr. Van Buren the head of the Whig party. [Laughter.] claimed Free soil as a distinctive Whig doctrine, and declared that, were the Whigs to join the peculiar Free soil organization, they would only make that the Whig party with Martin Van Buren at its head. Gov. Seward In his speech at Cleveland, Ohio, October 26, 1848, Gov. Seward said: A sixth principle is, that Slavery must be abolished. I think these are the principles of the Whigs of the Western Reserve of Ohio. <*> am not now to say for the first time that they are mine. * * * There are two antagonistic elements of society in America, Freedom and Slavery. Freedom is in harmony with our system of government, and with the spirit of the age, and is therefore passive and quiescent. Slavery is in conflict with that syste
endment and repeal; and our flag shall be the same that our fathers fought under in the Revolution. Under this Constitution, the offices of President and Commander-in-Chief were to be separate, and in all cases to be held by different persons. John Brown was chosen Commander-in-Chief; J. H. Kagi, Secretary of War; Owen Brown (son of John), Treasurer; Richard Realf, Secretary of State. Brown returned to the States soon after his triumphal entry into Canada as a liberator, and was at Cleveland from the 20th to the 30th of March. He entered his name on the hotel-book, as John Brown, of Kansas, advertised two horses for sale at auction; and, at the time of the sale, stood in front of the auctioneer's stand, notifying all bidders that the title might be considered defective, since he had taken the horses with the slaves whom he liberated in Western Missouri, finding it necessary to his success that the slaves should have horses, and that the masters should not. But, he added, when
inois, for Washington, receiving on the way advices that he had been, upon a careful canvass and comparison of the Electoral votes by Congress, proclaimed February 13th. by Vice-President Breckinridge the duly elected President of the United States, for four years from the 4th of March ensuing. Immense crowds surrounded the stations at which the special train halted wherein he, with his family and a few friends, was borne eastward through Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Erie, Buffalo, Albany, New York City, Trenton, Newark, Philadelphia, Lancaster, and Harrisburg, on his way to the White House. He was everywhere received and honored as the chief of a free people; and his unstudied remarks in reply to the complimentary addresses which he day by day received indicated his decided disbelief in any bloody issue of our domestic complications. Thus, at Indianapolis, where he spent the first night of his journey, he replied to an address of welcome from Gov
the Synod's records the reception of the report, which had meantime been printed, and had excited some feeling among the slaveholders. Ii. New school Presbyterians condemn the institution. The statement on page 120, respecting the attitude of the New School Presbyterian Church toward Slavery, is held by members of that Church to require qualification, in view of its more recent action on the subject. The material facts are as follows: At the session of the General Assembly at Cleveland, Ohio, for 1857, a report on Slavery of the Committee on Bills and Overtures, after having been debated with great animation for the better part of a week, was finally adopted (June 3d), by the decisive majority of 169 yeas to 26 nays. This report is largely devoted to a recital of the former testimonies of the Presbyterian Church on the general subject, and is leveled at the new Southern doctrine that Slavery is essentially beneficent and just — a doctrine notoriously at variance with that
letter to Leslie Combs, etc., 343-4; he likens the Union to a marriage, 857; allusion to, 399; 404; Pollard's estimate of Clay's influence, etc., 609-10. Clayton, John M., of Del., 190. Clemens, Hon. Jere., at Huntsville, Ala., 632. Cleveland, Ohio, Gov. Seward's speech at, 199; John Brown's proceedings at, 288. Clingman, Thomas L., of N. C., 308; 329 ; his prescription for free debaters, 373; allusion to, 406; 487; in Confederate Congress, 485-6; allusion to, 514. Clinton, De Wie Peace Conference, 397-8; vote on it, 399; laid on table, 402. Semmes, Capt. Raphael, the Sumter, 602. Sergeant, John, of Pa., appointed to the Panama Congress, 268-9. Seward, Wm. H., speech of March 11th, 1850, 48; 129; speech at Cleveland, Ohio, 199; 201; 231; 251; his irrepressible conflict speech, 301; in the Chicago Convention, 321; speech at Auburn, 1860, 327; 360; his proposition in the Committee of Thirteen, 383; 391; 402; a member of President Lincoln's cabinet. 428; his in