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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 35 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 52 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 47 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 35 29 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 25 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Cleveland (Ohio, United States) or search for Cleveland (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 73 results in 44 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Banks, National. (search)
ught it would greatly facilitate the negotiation of the United States bonds; in other words, make it much easier for the government to borrow money. It was also claimed that it would secure for the people in all parts of the country a currency of uniform security and value, and protect them from loss in discounts and exchanges — advantages which were regarded as of much importance then, after the experience people had had with State banks whose issue was good in Pittsburg and worthless in Cleveland, and Vice versa, and might be stable in either place one day and worthless the next, to say nothing of the annoyance of carrying $100 as many miles and finding it only rated at $40. Still, there was much opposition to the national bank bill. Early in 1863 it was introduced into the Senate by Mr. Sherman, and referred to the finance committee, from which it was reported by him Feb. 2, and ten days later passed by a vote of 23 to 21. On the 20th of the same month it also passed the House
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blake, Homer Crane, 1822- (search)
Blake, Homer Crane, 1822- Naval officer; born in Cleveland, O., Feb. 1, 1822; entered the navy as a midshipman in 1840; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1862, and in 1863, while in command of the Hatteras, off Galveston, Tex., was ordered to chase a suspicious vessel, which proved to be the Confederate cruiser Alabama. the Hatteras was no match for the cruiser, and Blake was obliged to surrender. Within ten minutes of his surrender the Hatteras went down. He died Jan. 21, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brough, John, 1811-1865 (search)
Brough, John, 1811-1865 Journalist born in Marietta, O., in 1811; learned the printer's trade in the office of the Marietta Gazette; and was editor of Democratic newspapers in Lancaster and Cincinnati. He held several State offices in Ohio: was a member of the joint commission to adjust the boundary line between that State and Virginia; became a popular Democratic orator; was an active war Democrat in the early part of the Civil War; and was elected governor of Ohio as the Republic-Union candidate in 1863. He died in Cleveland, O., Aug. 29, 1865.
s own baggage and that of most of his officers; also all of his hospital stores, intrenching tools, and a trunk containing, his most valuable military papers. The wives of three of his officers, with thirty soldiers to protect the schooner, also embarked in her. In a smaller vessel the invalids of the army were conveyed. Both vessels arrived at the site of Toledo on the evening of July 1. The next day, when near Frenchtown (afterwards Monroe), Hull received a note from the postmaster at Cleveland announcing the declaration of war. It was the first intimation he had received of that important event. In fact, the British at Fort Malden (now Amherstburg) heard of the declaration before Hull did, and captured his schooner, with all its precious freight. The commander at Malden had been informed of it, by express, as early as June 30—two days before it reached Hull. The latter pressed forward, and encamped near Detroit on July 5. The British were then casting up intrenchments at San
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
001821108Coalport, Pa., to Easton, Pa. Louisville and Portland5,578,63118722 1-2At Falls of Ohio River, Louisville, Ky. Miami and Erie8,062,6801835274Cincinnati, O., to Toledo, O. Morris 6,000,0001836103Easton, Pa., to Jersey City, N. J. Muscle Shoals and Elk River Shoals.3,156,919188916Big Muscle Shoals, Tenn., to Elk River Shoals, Tenn. Newbern and Beaufort3Clubfoot Creek to Harlow Creek, N C. Ogeechee 407,818184016Savannah River, Ga., to Ogeechee River, Ga. Ohio 4,695,2041835317Cleveland, O., to Portsmouth, O. Oswego5,239,526182838Oswego, N. Y., to Syracuse, N. Y. Pennsylvania7,731,7501839193Columbia, Northumberland, W1ilkesbarre, Huntingdon, Pa. Portage Lake and Lake Superior528,892187325From Keweenaw Bay to Lake Superior. Port Arthur18997Port Arthur, Tex., to Gulf of Mexico. Santa Fe 70,00188010Waldo, Fla., to Melrose, Fla. Sault Ste. Marie 4,000,00018953Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at St. Mary's River. Schuylkill Navigation Co12,461,6001826108Mill Creek, Pa.,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
rease: The following table shows the population of all cities having 25,000 and upward inhabitants in the census years 1890 and 1900, together with their change. Cities with population exceeding 25,000. City.population.increase since 1900.1890.1890 New York, N. Y.3,437,2022,492,591944,611 Chicago, Ill.1,698,5751,099,850598,725 Philadelphia. Pa.1,293,6971,046,964246,733 St. Louis. Mo.575,238451,770123,468 Boston, Mass.560,892448,477112,415 Baltimore, Md.508,957434,43974,518 Cleveland, O.381,768261,353120,415 Buffalo, N. Y.352,387255,66496,723 San Francisco, Cal.342,782298,99743,785 Cincinnati, O.325,902296,90828,994 Pittsburg, Pa.321,616238,61782,999 New Orleans, La.287,104242,03945,065 Detroit, Mich.285,704205,87678,828 Milwaukee, Wis.285,315204,46880,847 Washington, D. C.278,718230,39248,326 Newark, N. J.246,070181,83064,240 Jersey City, N. J.206,433163,00343,430 Louisville, Ky.204,731161,12943,602 Minneapolis, Minn.202,718164,73837,980 Providence, R. I.17
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
ia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railway taken possession of by the United States government.—23. The first South Carolina Confederate regiment started for the Potomac.—28. Virginia proclaimed a member of the Confederacy by its governor.— 30. The legislature of Virginia, by act, established a State navy.—May 3. The legislature of Connecticut voted $2,000,000 for the public defence.—4. The governors of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and other States met at Cleveland, O., to devise plans for the defence of the Western States.—7. The governor of Tennessee announced a military league between the State and the Confederacy.—10. The President of the United States proclaimed martial law on the islands of Key West, the Tortugas, and Santa Rosa.—11. The blockade of Charleston, S. C., established.—13. The blockade of the Mississippi River at Cairo established.—15. The legislature of Massachusetts offered to loan the United States government $7,0
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cleveland (search)
Cleveland The most important port of Ohio, on Lake Erie, was named after (Gen. Moses Cleaveland, director of the Connecticut Land Company, who arrived at the present site of Cleveland, July 22, 1796, and began the settlement at the mouth of Cuyahoga River. In 1800 the population was only 7; in 1810 it was 57; 1820, 150; 1830, 1,075; 1840, 6,071; 1850, 17,034. In 1854, Ohio City, on the opposite bank of the river, was united with Cleveland, and in 1860 the population of the united cities fter (Gen. Moses Cleaveland, director of the Connecticut Land Company, who arrived at the present site of Cleveland, July 22, 1796, and began the settlement at the mouth of Cuyahoga River. In 1800 the population was only 7; in 1810 it was 57; 1820, 150; 1830, 1,075; 1840, 6,071; 1850, 17,034. In 1854, Ohio City, on the opposite bank of the river, was united with Cleveland, and in 1860 the population of the united cities was 43,838; in 1870. 92,829; 1880, 159,404; 1890, 261.353; 1900, 381,768.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Education, elementary. (search)
achers, and that the increase of urban population has made it possible. In the normal school the candidate is taught the history of education, the approved methods of instruction, and the grounds of each branch of study as they are to be found in the sciences that it presupposes. The method of eliminating politics from the control of a city school system is discussed in Judge Draper's frank and persuasive style, and a plan in essential particulars similar to that adopted in the city of Cleveland is recommended for trial in all large cities. A small schoolboard of five or ten members is appointed by the mayor, which, in turn, elects a school-director (but this officer may also be appointed by the mayor), who takes charge of the business side of the management of schools. For the professional side of the work a superintendent is appointed by the school-director, with the approval of two-thirds or three-fourths of the school-board. The terms of office suggested are, respectively,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
d provisions to all of them. Setting out from Buffalo on June 27, they coasted along the shore of the lake, some of the party in boats and others marching along the banks. In the journal of Seth Pease, published in Whittlesey's History of Cleveland, I find the following: Monday, July 4, 1796.—We that came by land arrived at the confines of New Connecticut, and gave three cheers precisely at five o'clock P. M. We then proceeded to Conneaut, at five hours thirty minutes, our boats gotthe commissary of the expedition, was called Stow Castle. At this time the white inhabitants west of the Genesee River and along the coasts of the lakes were as follows: the garrison at Niagara, two families at Lewiston, one at Buffalo, one at Cleveland, and one at Sandusky. There were no other families east of Detroit; :and, with the exception of a few adventurers at the Salt Springs of the Mahoning, the interior of New Connecticut was an unbroken wilderness. The work of surveying was com
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