Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Dover, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Dover, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 22 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickering, Jesse 1797-1855 (search)
Chickering, Jesse 1797-1855 Political economist; born in Dover, N. H., Aug. 31, 1797; graduated at Harvard College in 1818; later studied medicine and practised in Boston, Mass. His publications include Statistical view of the population of Massachusetts from 1765-1840; Emigration into the United States; Reports on the census of Boston; and a Letter addressed to the President of the United States on slavery, considered in relation to the principles of constitutional government in Great Britain and in the United States. He died in West Roxbury, Mass., May 29, 1855.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fort Donelson, (search)
l that region, for Unionism was everywhere prevalent, but suppressed by the mailed hand of the Confederate leaders. Phelps's report caused an immediate expedition against Fort Donelson, situated on the high left bank of the Cumberland River, at Dover, the capital of Stewart county, Tenn. It was formed chiefly of outlying intrenchments, covering about 100 acres, upon hills furrowed by ravines. At Fort Henry, General Grant reorganized his army in three divisions, under Generals McClernand, Smirough them and escape to the open country in the direction of Nashville. This was attempted at five o'clock (Feb. 15). The troops engaged in it were about 10,000 in number, commanded by Generals Pillow and Bushrod R. Johnson. They advanced from Dover—Mississippians, Tennesseeans, and Virginians—accompanied by Forrest's cavalry. The main body was directed to attack McClernand's division, who occupied the heights that reached to the river. Buckner was directed to strike Wallace's division, in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farmer, Moses Gerrish 1820-1893 (search)
Farmer, Moses Gerrish 1820-1893 Electrician; born in Boscawen, N. H., Feb. 9, 1820; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1844; taught in Elliot, Me., and in Dover, N. H., for two years. During his leisure hours while in Dover he invented several forms of electro-motors, one of which he used in his experimental workshop to drive a vertical lathe, and the other was used on a miniature railway. Both motors were originally designed to illustrate his lectures. He demonstrated that the electrical Dover he invented several forms of electro-motors, one of which he used in his experimental workshop to drive a vertical lathe, and the other was used on a miniature railway. Both motors were originally designed to illustrate his lectures. He demonstrated that the electrical current could be used for discharging torpedoes and in submarine blasting. On his miniature railway he transported by electricity the first passengers ever so carried in the United States. In 1847 he moved to Framingham, Mass., and invented the telegraph fire-alarm. In 1865 he invented a thermo-electric battery and also built the first dynamo machine. In 1880 he patented an automatic electric-light system. Besides these inventions he brought to light and perfected many others. He is consi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hale, John Parker 1806-1873 (search)
Parker 1806-1873 Politician; born in Rochester, N. Ht., March 31, 1806: graduated at Bowdoin College in 1827; studied in his native town, and was there admitted to the bar in 1830. He was appointed United States district attorney in 1834 and reappointed in 1838, but was removed, June 17, 1841, by President Tyler on party grounds. In 1842 he was elected to Congress; and in 1847-53 was a United States Senator. He was counsel, in 1851, in the trials which resulted from the forcible rescue of the fugitive slave Shadrach from the custody of the United States marshal in Boston. He was nominated by the Free-soil party for President of the United States, with George W. Julian for Vice-President, in 1852, and received 157,680 votes. In 1855 he was returned to the United States Senate for the four years of the unexpired term of Mr. Atherton, deceased, and in 1859 was re-elected for a full term. He was United States minister to Spain in 1865-69. He died in Dover, N. H., Nov. 19, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Laconia, (search)
Laconia, The name given by Gorges and Mason to the portion of New England granted to them, extending from the Merrimac to the Kennebec, and from the ocean to the St. Lawrence. The proprietors induced several merchants to join them in their adventure, and sent out a colony of fishermen, a part of whom settled at the mouth of the Piscataqua, now Portsmouth, N. H. Others settled on the site of Dover, 8 miles farther up the river. The Laconia Company did not prosper, and the towns were little more than fishing-stations. See New Hampshire.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of New Hampshire, (search)
e east, and secure the country to the Protestants, Gorges secured a grant from Sir William Alexander of the whole mainland eastward of the St Croix River, excepting a small part of Acadia. Mason had already obtained a grant of land (March 2, 1621) extending from Salem to the mouth of the Merrimac, which he called Mariana; and the same year a colony of fishermen seated themselves at Little Harbor, on the Piscataqua, just below the site of Portsmouth. Other fishermen settled on the site of Dover (1623), and there were soon several fishing-stations, but no permanent settlement until 1629, when Mason built a house near the mouth of the Piscataqua, and called the place Portsmouth. He and Gorges had agreed to divide their domain at the Piscataqua, and Mason, obtaining a patent for his portion of the territory, named it New Hampshire. He had been governor of Portsmouth, in Hampshire, England, and these names were given in commemoration of the fact. In the same year (1629), Rev. Mr. Wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oblong, the (search)
Oblong, the In 1731 the long-disputed boundary between New York and Connecticut seemed to be settled by mutual concessions. A tract of land lying within the claimed boundary of Connecticut, 580 rods in width, consisting of 61,440 acres, and called from its figure The Oblong, was ceded to New York as an equivalent for lands near Long Island Sound surrendered to Connecticut. That tract is now included in the Connecticut towns of Greenwich, Stamford, New Canaan, and Darien. This agreement was subscribed by the respective commissioners at Dover, then the only village on the west side of the Oblong. The dividing-line was not run regularly, and this gave rise to a vexatious controversy, which was settled in 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quint, Alonzo Hall 1828- (search)
Quint, Alonzo Hall 1828- Clergyman; born in Barnsley, N. H., Nov. 22, 1828; graduated at Dartmouth in 1864; pastor of Mather Church in Roxbury, Mass., 1858; chaplain of the 2d Massachusetts Infantry in 1861; elected to the State legislature in 1881. Among his writings are The Potomac and the Rapidan; The record of the 2d Massachusetts Infantry; The first parish in Dover, N. H., etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Shillaber, Benjamin Penhallow 1814-1890 (search)
Shillaber, Benjamin Penhallow 1814-1890 Author (popularly known as Mrs. Partington); born in Portsmouth, N. H., July 12, 1814; educated at Exeter Academy; learned the printer's trade in Dover, N. H., removed to Boston in 1840; and was connected with the Boston Post till 1850; editor of the Pathfinder, and, with Charles G. Halpine, of The carpet bag; returned to the Post in 1853, and remained till 1856, when he became an editor on The Saturday evening gazette, with which he remained ten years. He was author of Rhymes with reasons and without; Life sayings of Mrs. Partington; Partingtonian Patchwork, etc. He died in Chelsea, Mass., Nov. 25, 1890.
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