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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 273 19 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 181 13 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 136 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 108 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 71 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 54 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Columbia (South Carolina, United States) or search for Columbia (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
ld be caught and hanged; but the greater the danger the greater seemed to be his desire to attempt it. I told him to select a companion, to disguise himself as an East Tennessee refugee, work his way over the mountains into North Carolina, and at the time appointed to float down the Savannah River and burn that bridge. In a few days he had made his preparations and took his departure. The bridge was not burnt, and I supposed that Pike had been caught and hanged. When we reached Columbia, South Carolina, in February, 1865, just as we were leaving the town, in passing near the asylum, I heard my name called, and saw a very dirty fellow followed by a file of men running toward me, and as they got near I recognized Pike. He called to me to identify him as one of my men; he was then a prisoner under guard, and I instructed the guard to bring him that night to my camp some fifteen miles up the road, which was done. Pike gave me a graphic narrative of his adventures, which would have f
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
If I were sure that Savannah would soon be in our possession, I should be tempted to march for Milledgeville and Augusta; but I must first secure what I have. Jeff. Davis is at Macon. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. On the next day I telegraphed further that Jeff. Davis was with Hood at Palmetto Station. One of our spies was there at the time, who came in the next night, and reported to me the substance of his speech to the soldiers. It was a repetition of those he had made at Columbia, South Carolina, and Macon, Georgia, on his way out, which I had seen in the newspapers. Davis seemed to be perfectly upset by the fall of Atlanta, and to have lost all sense and reason. He denounced General Jos. Johnston and Governor Brown as little better than traitors; attributed to them personally the many misfortunes which had befallen their cause, and informed the soldiers that now the tables were to be turned; that General Forrest was already on our roads in Middle Tennessee; and that Hood
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
with my present command, I had expected, after reducing Savannah, instantly to march to Columbia, South Carolina; thence to Raleigh, and thence to report to you. But this would consume, it may be, sixlumbia, Tennessee. General Hood followed up this movement, skirmished lightly with Schofield at Columbia, began the passage of Duck River, below the town, and Cheatham's corps reached the vicinity of or Charleston, and will naturally divide his forces. I will then move either on Branchville or Columbia, by any curved line that gives us the best supplies, breaking up in our course as much railroad as possible; then, .ignoring Charleston and Augusta both, I would occupy Columbia and Camden, pausing there long enough to observe the effect. I would then strike for the Charleston & Wilmington Raithe utmost severities of war, we will pardon you for your desolation of Georgia. I look upon Columbia as quite as bad as Charleston, and I doubt if we shall spare the public buildings there as we d
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
nuary. 2. The whole army to move with loaded wagons by the roads leading in the direction of Columbia, which afford the best chance of forage and provisions. Howard to be at Pocotaligo by the 15thy, and occupy the common road which leads from Mount Pleasant toward Georgetown. When I get to Columbia, I think I shall move straight for Goldsboroa, via Fayetteville. By this circuit I cut all roauch opposition near Orangeburg, then I will for a time neglect that branch, and rapidly move on Columbia, and fill up the triangle formed by the Congaree and Wateree (tributaries of the Santee), breaks to this column is fatal to his dream of empire. Richmond is not more vital to his cause than Columbia and the heart of South Carolina. If Thomas will not move on Selma, order him to occupy Rome,not be misled. I prefer that Hatch's force should not be materially weakened until I am near Columbia, when you may be governed by the situation of affairs about Charleston. If you can break the r
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
by Snilling's Bridge, and moved straight for Columbia, around the head of Caw-Caw Swamp. Orders were sent to all the columns to turn for Columbia, where it was supposed the enemy had concentrated alboth Beauregard and Wade Hampton, who were in Columbia, seem to have lost their heads. On the 14tvers as near their mouths as possible, occupy Columbia, destroy the public buildings, railroad propess Broad River at Alston, fifteen miles above Columbia. Riding down to the river-bank, I saw the wr I camped near an old prison bivouac opposite Columbia, known to our prisoners of war as Camp sorghuwa Infantry, when a prisoner in the asylum at Columbia, which had been beautifully written off by a her a long social visit, and, before leaving Columbia, gave her a half-tierce of rice and about one Having walked over much of the suburbs of Columbia in the afternoon, and being tired, I lay down have caught Hardee at Cheraw or here; but at Columbia, Cheraw, and here, we have captured immense s[47 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
bout the effect of this act on the country at large and on the armies, and he realized that it made my situation extremely delicate. I explained to him that I had not yet revealed the news to my own personal staff or to the army, and that I dreaded the effect when made known in Raleigh. Mr. Lincoln was peculiarly endeared to the soldiers, and I feared that some foolish woman or man in Raleigh might say something or do something that would madden our men, and that a fate worse than that of Columbia would befall the place. I then told Johnston that he must be convinced that he could not oppose my army, and that, since Lee had surrendered, he could do the same with honor and propriety. lie plainly and repeatedly admitted this, and added that any further fighting would be murder; but he thought that, instead of surrendering piecemeal, we might arrange terms that would embrace all the Confederate armies. I asked him if he could control other armies than his own; lie said, not then, b