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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 14 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 77 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 56 56 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 30 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 30 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 8 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 23 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
n the 21st he ordered Ewell to take possession of Harrisburg; and on the 22d Ewell's whole corps was on the mahe bridge, which would enable him to operate upon Harrisburg from the rear; but a small militia force under Coalled out the militia. General Couch was sent to Harrisburg to organize and command them, but disbelief in th country. Defensive works were then thrown up at Harrisburg and else-where, and local forces were raised and , York, and the country between them, threatening Harrisburg. Unacquainted with Hooker's plans and views [seet once to move on the main line from Frederick to Harrisburg, extending his wings as far as compatible with a squehanna, and was charged with the protection of Harrisburg.--editors. His demand of a surrender was refused;rdered Longstreet and A. P. Hill to join Ewell at Harrisburg; but late that night one of Longstreet's scouts cted, whatever Lee's lines of approach, whether by Harrisburg or Gettysburg,--indicating the general line of Pi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hancock and Howard in the first day's fight. (search)
field, I returned to my former position at the cemetery. About this time (2:45 P. M.) the enemy showed himself in force in front of the Eleventh Corps. His batteries could be distinctly seen on a prominent slope between the Mummasburg and the Harrisburg roads. From this point he opened fire upon the Eleventh Corps, and also more or less enfilading Robinson's division of the First Corps. The batteries attached to the First and Third divisions, Eleventh Corps, immediately replied, and with evident effect. One battery of the enemy, a little more than a mile north from the cemetery, near the Harrisburg road, could be distinctly seen, and as I had a battery of 3-inch rifled guns, under Wiedrich, near my position, I directed him to fire, provided he could reach the enemy. He did so, but his shells for the most part fell short. Soon after complaint came that they reached no farther than our own cavalry; however, I never heard that any of our own men were killed or wounded by this fire.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Citizens of Gettysburg in the Union army. (search)
an invasion of Pennsylvania, the 26th Regiment, P. V. M., was organized and mustered into the United States service at Harrisburg, under the command of Colonel W. W. Jennings of that city. Company A of this regiment, to which I belonged,, was compoburg, and of citizens of the town; one other company came from Hanover, but a few miles distant. On June 23d we left Harrisburg for Gettysburg, to be used, I believe, as riflemen among the hills near Cashtown. A railroad accident prevented this p, under Meade, but where was it? Our colonel, left to his own resources, wisely decided to make an effort to return to Harrisburg, and immediately struck off from the pike, the Confederates capturing many of our rear-guard after a sharp skirmish, anarlisle road, where after an engagement they were repulsed with some loss. After many vicissitudes, we finally reached Harrisburg, having marched 54 out o f 60 consecutive hours, with a loss of some 200 men. It should be added that Gettysburg, sm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
tail was trodden upon. (Doubleday's Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. ) He adds the opinion that if he (Lee) had known that Meade was about to withdraw all the troops acting against his line of retreat, he would probably have gone on and taken Harrisburg. Whatever General Lee might have thought of the projected enterprise under Slocum, had he known of it, he, in fact, knew nothing whatever concerning it. The only intelligence that reached him was that the Union army had crossed the Potomac on the 25th, at Edwards's Ferry, moving toward Frederick and Boonsboro‘. It was this, and only this, which determined his march upon Gettysburg. General Lee's official report says: The advance against Harrisburg was arrested by intelligence received from a scout, on the night of the 28th, to the effect that the army of General Hooker had crossed the Potomac and was approaching the South Mountain. More remains to be said. Meade's movement northward from Frederick, with his whole army, was