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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 14 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 77 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 56 56 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 30 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 30 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 8 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 23 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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ittle to carry to be easily overtaken. He received some slight reinforcements on his march, and at the San Jacinto, April 10, met two guns (six-pounders), sent him from Cincinnati — his first. Santa Anna, still eagerly pressing on, had burned Harrisburg, the Texan capital, and crossed the San Jacinto with the advance of his army, the main body being detained on the other side by a freshet. Houston perceived his opportunity, and embraced it. Facing suddenly about, he attacked the Mexican vanguice-President, and received the electoral votes of Maryland, Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. In 1838, he was elected as a Whig to the Legislature of Virginia, and as such made a delegate to the Whig National Convention, which met at Harrisburg, Pa., in December, 1839. He there, along with his Virginia colleagues, zealously supported Mr. Clay for President, and was affected to tears when the choice of a majority of the Convention finally designated Gen. Harrison as the Whig candidate.
ver the same territory. And this remains to this day the adjudicated law of the land. The activity and universality of slave-hunting, under the act of 1850, were most remarkable. That act became a law on the 18th of September; and, within ten days thereafter, a negro named James Hamlet had been seized in the city of New York, and very summarily dispatched to a woman in Baltimore, who claimed him as her slave. Before the act was a month old, there had been several arrests under it, at Harrisburg and near Bedford, Pa., in Philadelphia, at Detroit, and in other places. Within the first year of its existence, more persons, probably, were seized as fugitive slaves than during the preceding sixty years. Many of these seizures were made under circumstances of great aggravation. Thus, in Philadelphia, Euphemia Williams, who had lived in Pennsylvania in freedom all her life, as she affirmed, and had there become the mother of six living children, of whom the oldest was seventeen, was ar
eastward through Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Erie, Buffalo, Albany, New York City, Trenton, Newark, Philadelphia, Lancaster, and Harrisburg, on his way to the White House. He was everywhere received and honored as the chief of a free people; and his unstudied remarks in reply to the complimentary a say, in advance, that there will be no bloodshed, unless it be forced upon the Government, and then it will be compelled to act in self defense. Arrived at Harrisburg, however, on the 22d, Mr. Lincoln, looking across the slave line, experienced suddenly a decided change in the political barometer. It had been arranged that h22d, and so passed through Baltimore, unknown and unsuspected, early on the morning of the 23d--reaching Washington about the hour that he was expected to leave Harrisburg. The prudence of this step has since been abundantly demonstrated; but it wounded, at the time, the sensibilities of many friends, who would have much preferre
rk Express and The Albany Argus. The Pennsylvanian (Philadelphia), and The Patriot and Union (Harrisburg), with nearly every other leading Democratic journal in Pennsylvania, also treated the war nowroad bridges northward and north-eastward from Baltimore, on the railroads to Philadelphia and Harrisburg, burned; thus shutting off Washington and the Government from all communication with the Northailroad President Garrett, announcing the approach of troops (Pennsylvanians) by railroad from Harrisburg to Cockeysville, a few miles north of Baltimore, and that the city was greatly excited thereby daring to advance over it to the defense of the National Metropolis, should be turned back to Harrisburg. There is not much more of this nature to be recorded; but, among the Baltimoreans who, nexok permanent military possession of the city on the 13th, while a force of Pennsylvanians from Harrisburg advanced to Cockeysville, reopening the Northern Central railroad. The Legislature adopted, o
., of Miss., 161. Hammond, James H., of S. C., 144; 180; 181; 830; 337. Hamner, Rev. James G., on Slavery, 631. Hampton, Va., burnt by Magruder's order, 529. Hampton, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 543. Hardy, Commander Robert, 603. Hardwicke, Lord, on Slavery, 29. Harlan, Mr., of Iowa, 307. Harney, Gen. Wm. S., makes a compact with Gen. Price; is superseded, 491. Harper's Ferry, 414; arsenal fired and evacuated, 462; evacuated by Rebels, 535. See John Brown. Harrisburg, Pa., fugitive-slave arrests at, 216. Harrisburg, Texas, burnt by Santa Anna, 150. Harris, Gov. Isham G., of Tenn., 349; his answer to the President's requisition, 459; 483; 612. Harris, Gen., (Rebel,) 574; 576; 589. Harrison, Wa. Henry, 52-3; 154; 515. Hartford Convention, the, 85. Hatteras, bombardment of the forts at, 599; their capture, 600; 627. Hawes, Richard, of Ky., allusion to, 509; succeeds Johnson, as Provisional Governor, 617. Hawkins, Capt., at Frederick