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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 14 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 77 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 56 56 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 30 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 30 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 24 8 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 23 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 4 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
overnor of Pennsylvania, but it was not the right kind. He has been again to Harrisburg and procured another, and is now in Washington, qualifying himself, so that Ie. is here and all right. Send word to Betty Wife of William Sergeant. at Harrisburg. Arlington House, Va., September 3, 1862. We arrived here this morning. left, when orders came, directing General Reynolds to proceed immediately to Harrisburg, which of course placed me in command of the division of Pennsylvania Reservn the position I am entitled to. I should have been delighted to have gone to Harrisburg in Reynolds's place, as I have no doubt he will get a large command there. the brilliant chances of the two battles. I envied Reynolds when he left for Harrisburg, and secretly thought the Governor might have applied for me. Afterwards —indt when I see the President calling out six months' men, and see the troops at Harrisburg refusing to be mustered in for fear they may be kept six months in service, I
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
ders, as were also those of General Couch at Harrisburg. However, as on June 29, telegraphic communpartment of the Susquehanna, Headquarters at Harrisburg. In the brief interval allowed by coming evby this officer to fortify the approaches to Harrisburg, situated on the left bank of the Susquehannis plans and countermanded the movement upon Harrisburg. The time of a possible coup de main had nod General Ewell was ordered to withdraw from Harrisburg to the same point. Under these orders, Gelled to withdraw Ewell from the direction of Harrisburg; but exactly where the battle would be foughy as rapidly as possible in the direction of Harrisburg; in which direction it was then supposed thaive knowledge of the enemy's withdrawal from Harrisburg and concentration was received. What we he overpower me, your return and defence of Harrisburg and the Susquehanna is not at all endangeredng despatch was sent Major-General Couch, at Harrisburg: The enemy has withdrawn from his positio[17 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
ing generals took place, when some insisted on falling back towards Taneytown, while others urged the expediency of maintaining their present position, as offering rare advantages for the inevitable and decisive contest that must occur on the following day. It appears that General Meade had issued a circular (of which I saw several copies) on the morning of Wednesday, July 1, to all his commanders, stating that his advance had accomplished all the objects contemplated—namely, the relief of Harrisburg and Philadelphia—and that he would now desist altogether from the offensive. He proposed to post the whole army in line of battle on Pipe Creek, the right flank resting on Manchester and the left on Middleburg, involving a new change of front, and there await the movements of the enemy. The position which General Meade had selected for the final struggle between the two armies was some fifteen miles distant from Gettysburg, where fate willed that it should occur. Whether this important
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
army, under General Ewell, was occupying York and Carlisle, and threatening the Susquehanna at Harrisburg and Columbia. My predecessor, General Hooker, left the camp in a very few hours after I reln-chief, that I should move my army as promptly as possible on the main line from Frederick to Harrisburg, extending my wings on both sides of that line as far as I could consistently with the safety e to prevent co-operation with this army than offensive. The general believes he has relieved Harrisburg and Philadelphia, and now desires to look to his own army, and assume position for offensive oobject of the movement of the army in this direction has been accomplished, viz: the relief of Harrisburg and the prevention of the enemy's intended invasion of Philadelphia beyond the Susquehanna. r corps to Gettysburg was ordered before the positive knowledge of the enemy's withdrawal from Harrisburg and concentration was received. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army o