hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 427 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 290 68 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 128 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 89 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 49 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 28 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 28 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. You can also browse the collection for Hartford (Connecticut, United States) or search for Hartford (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 66 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
Introductory statement. I desire to express my thanks here to Harper & Brothers, of New York, for permission to use letters already published in the Autobiography and correspondence of Lyman Beecher. I have availed myself freely of this permission in chapters i. and III. In chapter XX. I have given letters already published in the Life of George Eliot, by Mr. Cross; but in every instance I have copied from the original Mss. and not from the published work. In conclusion, I desire to express my indebtedness to Mr. Kirk Munroe, who has been my co-laborer in the work of compilation. Charles E. Stowe. Hartford, September 30, 1889.
inting by F. Rondel, in 1860, owned by Mrs. H. F. Allen186 Portrait of Lyman Beecher, at the age of eighty-seven. From a painting owned by the Boston Congregational Club . 264 Portrait of the Duchess of Sutherland. From an engraving presented to Mrs. Stowe.318 The old home at Hartford374 The home at Mandarin, Florida402 Portrait of Calvin Ellis Stowe. From a photograph taken in Portrait of Mrs. Stowe. From a photograph by Ritz and Hastings, in 1884 .470 The later Hartford home508 inting by F. Rondel, in 1860, owned by Mrs. H. F. Allen186 Portrait of Lyman Beecher, at the age of eighty-seven. From a painting owned by the Boston Congregational Club . 264 Portrait of the Duchess of Sutherland. From an engraving presented to Mrs. Stowe.318 The old home at Hartford374 The home at Mandarin, Florida402 Portrait of Calvin Ellis Stowe. From a photograph taken in Portrait of Mrs. Stowe. From a photograph by Ritz and Hastings, in 1884 .470 The later Hartford home508
1824. Death of her mother. first journey from home. life at nut plains. school days and hours with favorite authors. the new mother. Litchfield academy and its influence. first literary efforts. a remarkable composition. goes to Hartford. Harriet Beecher (Stowe) was born June 14, 1811, in the characteristic New England town of Litchfield, Conn. Her father was the Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher, a distinguished Calvinistic divine, her mother Roxanna Foote, his first wife. The little ost the image of his divine Creator, he is still destined, after this earthly house of his tabernacle is dissolved, to an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away, to a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Soon after the writing of this remarkable composition, Harriet's child-life in Litchfield came to an end, for that same year she went to Hartford to pursue her studies in a school which had been recently established by her sister Catherine in that city.
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 2: school days in Hartford, 1824-1832. (search)
Chapter 2: school days in Hartford, 1824-1832. Miss Catherine Beecher. Professor Fisheronversion. unites with the first church in Hartford.- her doubts and subsequent religious develont. her final peace. The school days in Hartford began a new era in Harriet's life. It was things. In this condition of mind, she came to Hartford in the winter of 1824, and began a school withe school that she had just started in Hartford, Connecticut. When I entered the school there were Then also the pastor of the First Church in Hartford, a bosom friend of Dr. Beecher, looked with mismissed last week Tuesday, and will be here (Hartford) next Tuesday with mamma and Isabel. Aunt Eserning Harriet: If she could come here (Hartford) it might be the best thing for her, for she 1828, shows us that Harriet had returned to Hartford and was preparing herself to teach drawing any of the following winter Harriet writes from Hartford to Edward, who is at this time with his fathe[8 more...]
be passed. At this time her sister Mary was married and living in Hartford, her brothers Henry Ward and Charles were in college, while Willis westward journey is given by Mrs. Stowe in a letter sent back to Hartford from Cincinnati, as follows:-- Well, my dear, the great sheetts from Mrs. Stowe's answer to the first letter they received from Hartford after leaving there :-- My dear Sister (Mary),--The Hartford Hartford letter from all and sundry has just arrived, and after cutting all manner of capers expressive of thankfulness, I have skipped three stairs at know how anxiously we all have watched for some intelligence from Hartford. Not a day has passed when I have not been the efficient agent inface now! And then those well known handwritings! We do love our Hartford friends dearly; there can be, I think, no controverting that fact.e afternoon, and then I held up my letter. See here, this is from Hartford! I wish you could have seen Aunt Esther's eyes brighten, and moth
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 4: early married life, 1836-1840. (search)
gland. He sails the first of May. I am going with him to Boston, New York, and other places, and shall stop finally at Hartford, whence, as soon as he is gone, it is my intention to return westward. This reference to her husband as about to leautobiography occurred. Edward made a visit to the East, and when he returned he brought Mary (Mrs. Thomas Perkins) from Hartford with him. William came down from Putnam, Ohio, and George from Batavia, New York, while Catherine, Harriet, Henry, Charl sheets, bearing in faded ink the names of all the Beechers, lies outspread before us as we write. It is postmarked Hartford, Conn., Batavia, N. Y., Chillicothe, Ohio, Zanesville, Ohio, Walnut Hills, Ohio, Indianapolis, Ind., Jacksonville, Ill., ans, La. In it Mrs. Stowe occupies her allotted space with- Walnut Hills, April 27, 1839. Dear Friends,--I am going to Hartford myself, and therefore shall not write, but hurry along the preparations for my forward journey. Belle, father says you
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 5: poverty and sickness, 1840-1850. (search)
troubles have been but enough to keep me from loving earth too well. In the spring of 1842 Mrs. Stowe again visited Hartford, taking her six-year-old daughter Hatty with her. In writing from there to her husband she confides some of her literaryss; so much of so many things and so little of so many other things? In answer to this letter Mrs. Stowe writes from Hartford:-- I have seen Johnson of the Evangelist. He is very liberally disposed, and I may safely reckon on being paid forperfect sympathy of feeling existed between the husband and wife, is shown by a line in one of Mrs. Stowe's letters from Hartford in which she says: I was telling Belle yesterday that I did not know till I came away how much I was dependent upfunds were provided is evident from the fact that the journey was undertaken and the invalid spent the summer of 1845 in Hartford, in Natick, and in Boston. She was not, however, permanently benefited by the change, and in the following spring it w
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 6: removal to Brunswick, 1850-1852. (search)
s to her own biography. reasons for Professor Stowe's leaving Cincinnati. Mrs. Stowe's journey to Brooklyn. her brother's success as a minister. letters from Hartford and Boston. arrives in Brunswick. history of the slavery agitation. practical working of the fugitive slave law. Mrs. Edward Beecher's letter to Mrs. Stowe aot anything for those pieces I wrote before coming away, I would like to be advised thereof by you. . . . My plan is to spend this week in Brooklyn, the next in Hartford, the next in Boston, and go on to Brunswick some time in May or June. May 18, 1850, we find her writing from Boston, where she is staying with her brother, Rev. Edward Beecher-- My dear husband,--I came here from Hartford on Monday, and have since then been busily engaged in the business of buying and packing furniture. I expect to go to Brunswick next Tuesday night by the Bath steamer, which way I take as the cheaper. My traveling expenses, when I get to Brunswick, including
r 16: the Civil war, 1860-1865. The outbreak of Civil war. Mrs. Stowe's son enlists. Thanksgiving day in Washington. the proclamation of emancipation. Rejoicings in Boston. Fred Stowe at Gettysburg. leaving Andover and settling in Hartford. a reply to the women of England. letters from John bright, Archbishop Whately, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Immediately after Mrs. Stowe's return from Europe, it became only too evident that the nation was rapidly and inevitably drifting intte nothing is known. Meantime, the year 1863 was proving eventful in many other ways to Mrs. Stowe. In the first place, the long and pleasant Andover connection of Professor Stowe was about to be severed, and the family were to remove to Hartford, Conn. They were to occupy a house that Mrs. Stowe was building on the bank of Park River. It was erected in a grove of oaks that had in her girlhood been one of Mrs. Stowe's favorite resorts. Here, with her friend Georgiana May, she had passed m
ving ended, Mrs. Stowe wrote the following letter to the Duchess of Argyll:-- Hartford, February 19, 1866. My dear friend,--Your letter was a real spring of comfotest pleasure to see him here. Our dull, prosy, commonplace, though good old Hartford could offer few attractions compared with Boston or New York, and yet I hope hr advantages of Mandarin on the east side of the river, Mrs. Stowe writes from Hartford, May 29, 1867, to Rev. Charles Beecher-- My dear brother ,--We are now th next you hear of me will be at the North, where our address is Forest Street, Hartford. We have bought a pretty cottage there, near to Belle, and shall spend the suher we have down here. It does not debilitate me like the soft October air in Hartford. During the following February, she writes in reply to an invitation to viwas in too precarious a state to permit him to undertake the long journey from Hartford. By this time one of Mrs. Stowe's fondest hopes had been realized; and, large
1 2