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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 128 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 94 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 8 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 42 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 38 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
nteeism would curse us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past, or foreign countries, need not be sought unto to furnish illustrations of the heritage of shame that subjugation would entail. Baltimore, St. Louis, Nashville, Knoxville, New Orleans, Vicksburg, Huntsville, Norfolk, Newbern, Louisville and Fredericksburg, are the first fruits of the ignominy and poverty of Yankee domination. The sad story of the wrongs and indignities endured by those States which have been in the complete or partial possession of the enemy, will give the best evidence of the consequences of subjugation. Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to-day a smoking ruin and the theatre of the most revolting cruelties and barbarities. The minions
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
ost and Newtown, and within one and a half miles of Winchester. July 21st Anniversary of the first battle of Manassas. We were drawn up in line of battle at Newtown and Middletown, and ready to repeat the memorable lesson in running taught our enemies at Manassas this day three years ago. But they declined to give us the chance. Three years ago my regiment, officered by Colonel R. T. Jones, of Marion, Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel Theodore O'Hara, of Mobile, and Major E. D. Tracy, of Huntsville, with my company, then officered by Captain R. F. Ligon and Lieutenants R. H. Keeling, William Zuber and George Jones, were hurried on the cars from Richmond to Manassas, but reached there only in time to go over the battle-field after the fierce conflict was over. I saw hundreds of Brooklyn Zouaves, in their gay red breeches and gaudily trimmed coats, lying lifeless where they had been slain. Also saw the noble steed of the heroic Bartow lying near the spot where his master fell. Soon
ordered to Chattanooga, and those which will be necessary on the march have been forwarded to Huntsville and Decatur. I have ordered a depot to be established at Atlanta for the manufacture of supplen sent forward to Chattanooga, except what may be needed for the immediate use of the army at Huntsville and Decatur and points farther on toward Memphis, this command will commence the march to-morrother commissary supplies were left at Nashville, Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and Huntsville. Again, the movement was made over the metal roads leading to Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and Huntsville, as expeditiously, considering the number of troops to be transported, as it could have been by rail, with the imperfect organization of the railroad, as it then existed. The movement fgiven in full, and will be found to reflect equal credit on his head and heart. [Telegram.] Huntsville, March 7-11 A. M. Your dispatch is just received. I sent Colonel Liddell to Richmond on th
section of two great lines of railroad, and except its two thousand inhabitants, or thereabouts, and a few wooden stores, contains nothing worthy of observation: its chief edifice is the Tishomingo Hotel. The lines of railway that intersect here are those of the Mississippi Central, and the Mobile and Ohio Railroads: the first was an unbroken line from New-Orleans, and crossing the Mobile road at this place, ran to Grand Junction, whence one branch went to Memphis, Tenn., and the other to Huntsville, Chattanooga, and thence into Virginia; the second ran direct from Mobile, passed the junction at this place, and ran on to Columbus, Kentucky. In a military point of view, the occupation of this point was of vital importance, as will appear at once to any intelligent reader who glances at the map. North of the town we found the fields and woods picturesquely dotted with tents; we could see various regiments under drill in the distance, and faintly heard the word of command of field o
mile beyond. General Mitchell, with Turchin's and Sill's brigades and two batteries, left for Huntsville on our arrival. There are various and contradictory rumors afloat respecting the conditionagain, the division pushed on alone to Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and finally to Huntsville and Decatur, Alabama, at each place expecting a battle, and yet meeting with no opposition. Wte a number of them had been in the Sunday's battle, and, being wounded, had been sent back to Huntsville. General Mitchell had captured and released them on parole. Some had their heads bandaged, oo the volunteer service: Steady on the right ; Guide center; Forward, double quick. Reached Huntsville at five in the afternoon. April, 16 Just after sunset Colonel Keifer and I strolled intocrosses the Tennessee river at this point. Tile town is a dilapidated old concern, as ugly as Huntsville is handsome. There is a canebrake near the camp, and every soldier in the regiment has pro
May, 1 Moved to Bellefonte. May, 2 Took the cars for Huntsville. At Paint Rock the train was fired upon, and six or eight men three citizens with me, returned to the train, and proceeded to Huntsville. Paint Rock has long been a rendezvous for bushwhackers and b appointed President of a Board of Administration for the post of Huntsville. After an ineffectual effort to get the members of the Board togouthward, we abandoned pursuit and turned to retrace our steps to Huntsville. Leaving the regiment in command of Colonel Keifer, I accompanieille. Fifteen hundred mounted men were within seventeen miles of Huntsville yesterday. A regiment with four pieces of artillery, under commagroes, have strayed away or been stolen. May, 23 The men of Huntsville have settled down to a patient endurance of military rule. They ners know to be a hopeless struggle. But we must not judge these Huntsville women too harshly. Here are the families of many of the leading
She replied Pudin‘ an‘ tame. So I called her Pudin‘, and she became very angry, so angry indeed that she cried. The other little girls laughed heartily, and called her Pudin‘ also, and then asked my name. I answered John Smith; they insisted then that Pudin‘ was my wife, and called her Pudin‘ Smith. This made Pudin‘ furious, and she abused her companions and me terribly; but John Smith invested a little money in cherries, and thus pacified Pudin‘, and so got to Louisville without getting his hair pulled. I saw no more of Pudin‘ until she got off the cars at Elizabethtown. Going up to her, we shook hands, and I said, Good-by, Pudin‘. She hung her head for a moment, and tried to look angry, but finally breaking into a laugh she said, I do n't like you at all any way, good-by. June, 27 Reached Huntsville. The regiment in good condition, boys well; weather hot. General Buell arrived last night. McCook's Division is here; Nelson, Crittenden, and Wood on
s own use; but the Government should lay its mailed hand upon treasonable communities, and teach them that war is no holiday pastime. July, 19 Returned to Huntsville this afternoon; General Garfield with me. He will visit our quarters tomorrow and dine with us. General Rousseau has been assigned to the command of our divto learn that he talks as he does. Turchin has been made a brigadier. July, 21 An order issued late last evening transferring our court from Athens to Huntsville. Colonel Turchin's case is still before us. No official notice of his promotion has been communicated to the court. July, 23 Garfield and Ammen are outed that the young men had set up a job on him. The regiment went on a foraging expedition yesterday, under Colonel Keifer, and was some fifteen miles from Huntsville, in the direction of the Tennessee river. At one o'clock last night our picket was confronted by about one hundred and fifty of the enemy's cavalry; but no
n't tote a coon, he scratch an‘ bite so. The gentlemen of the South have a great fondness for jewelry, canes, cigars, and dogs. Out of forty white men thirty-nine, at least, will have canes, and on Sunday the fortieth will have one also. White men rarely work here. There are, it is true, tailors, merchants, saddlers, and jewelers, but the whites never drive teams, work in the fields, or engage in what may be termed rough work. Judging from the number of stores and present stocks, Huntsville, in the better times, does a heavier retail jewelry business than Cleveland or Columbus. Every planter, and every wealthy or even well-to-do man, has plate. Diamonds, rings, gold watches, chains, and bracelets are to be found in every family. The negroes buy large amounts of cheap jewelry, and the trade in this branch is enormous. One may walk a whole day in a Northern city without seeing a ruffled shirt. Here they are very common. The case of Colonel Mihalotzy was concluded to-d
it to all the glory and usefulness of former days. One of its sweetest singers, however, has either deserted or retired to hospital or barracks, where the duties are less onerous and life more safe. His greatest hit was a song known as The warble, in which the following lines occurred: Mein fadter, mein modter, mein sister, mein frau, Und zwi glass of beer for meinself. Dey called mein frau one blacksmit-schopt; Und such dings I never did see in my life. When, at Shelbyville and Huntsville, this melody mingled with the moonlight of summer evenings, people generally were deluded into the supposition that an ethereal songster was on the wing, enrapturing them with harmonies of other spheres. But sutlers, it is well known, are men of little or no refinement, with ears for money rather than music. To their unappreciative and perverted senses the warble seemed simply a dolorous appeal for more whisky; and while delivering up their last bottle to get rid of the warbler and his f
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