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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 171 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 42 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) or search for Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
action on the subject of secession should be submitted to the vote of the people. The election resulted in the choice of a large majority of Union delegates Claiborne F. Jackson. by a heavy majority of the popular vote. They assembled at Jefferson City on the 28th of February. Their proceedings will be considered hereafter. Adjoining Missouri on the south, and lying between it and Louisiana, is Arkansas, a rapidly growing Cotton-producing State. The people were mostly of the planting cllification had lately been put forth as an orthodox dogma of the Democratic creed, and the movements of Calhoun and his political friends were looked upon with suspicion. At this dinner. it was soon apparent that the object was, not to honor Jefferson's memory, but to commence treasonable work with the sanction of his name and deeds. Jackson perceived this plainly, and offered as a toast, Our Federal Union: it must be preserved. Calhoun immediately arose and offered the following:--The Uni
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
in their election of delegates to the State Convention, which assembled at Jefferson City on the 28th of February. In that Convention there was Jefferson City in Jefferson City in 1861. not a single openly avowed disunionist, but there were a few secret ones and many Conditional Unionists. The Convention consisted of one hundred and. four mng April 22, 1865. the Legislature to assemble in extraordinary session at Jefferson City on the 2d day of May, for the purpose, he said, of enacting such laws and aure of Camp Jackson produced great consternation among the secessionists at Jefferson City, the capital of the State, where the Legislature was in session. A militarperemptorily refused compliance, and Jackson and his associates returned to Jefferson City that night. On the following day June 12, 1861. the Governor issued a protate. At the same time two important railway bridges between St. Louis and Jefferson City were burnt, and the telegraph wires were cut, under the direction of a son
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
proposed the fairest terms for conciliation, but they were rejected, and that now nothing was left for him to do but to resist invasion by force of arms. At Jefferson City, the capital of the State, he raised the standard of revolt, with General Sterling Price as military commander. General Lyon promptly took up the gauntlet by way of the railroad, destroying the bridges behind them, and, turning northward, took post a few miles below Booneville, on the Missouri, forty miles from Jefferson City. Lyon followed them the next day, June 16. leaving Colonel Boernstein, with three companies of his regiment, to hold the capital. Contrary to the expectaticouraged by the aspect of affairs favorable to the maintenance of the National authority in the Commonwealth, the State Convention was called to reassemble at Jefferson City on the 22d of July. General Lyon remained at Booneville about a fortnight, making preparations for a vigorous campaign against gathering insurgents in the