Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) or search for Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 69 results in 30 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
(Miss.)May 16, 1863 Big Black River (Miss.)May 17, 1863 Vicksburg (Miss.)May 19-22, 1863 Port Hudson (La.)May 27, 1863 Hanover Junction (Pa.)June 30, 1863 Gettysburg (Pa.)July 1-3, 1863 Vicksburg (Surrendered)July 4, 1863 Helena (Ark.)July 4, 1863 Port Hudson (Surrendered)July 9, 1863 Jackson (Miss.)July 16, 1863 Fort Wagner (S. C.)July 10-18, 1863 Morgan's Great Raid (Ind. and O.)June 24 to July 26, 1863 ChickamaugaSept. 19 and 20, Campbell's Station (Tenn.)Nov. 16, 1863 Knoxville (Tenn.; Besieged)Nov. 17 to Dec. 4, 1863 Lookout Mountain (Tenn.)Nov. 24, 1863 Missionary Ridge (Tenn.)Nov. 25, 1863 Olustee (Fla.)Feb. 20, 1864 Sabine Cross Roads (La.)April 8, 1864 Pleasant Hill (La.)April 9, 1864 Fort Pillow (Tenn.; Massacre at)April 12, 1864 Wilderness (Va.)May 5 and 6, Spottsylvania Court-House (Va.)May 7-12, 1864 Resaca (Ga.)May 14 and 15, Bermuda HundredMay 10, 1864 New Hope Church (Ga.)May 25, 1864 Cold Harbor (Va.)June 1-3, 1864 Petersburg (Va.; Smith's
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blount, William, 1744-1800 (search)
Representatives, charged with having intrigued, while territorial governor, to transfer New Orleans and neighboring districts (then belonging to Spain) to Great Britain by means of a joint expedition of Englishmen and Creek and Cherokee Indians. He was expelled from the Senate, and the process was discontinued in the House. His popularity in Tennessee was increased by these proceedings, and he became, by the voice of the people, a State Senator and president of that body. He died in Knoxville, Tenn., March 21, 1800. Blue, Victor, naval officer; horn in Marion, S. C.. Dec. 6, 1865; entered the United States Naval Academy, Sept. 6, 1883; was an assistant engineer in 1889-92; then promoted to ensign; served on the Alliance and Thetis; and was assigned to duty at the Naval Academy, Sept. 28, 1896. When the war with Spain broke out he was promoted to lieutenant, and ordered to the gunboat Suwanee. On June 11, 1898, he was landed at Acerraderos, Cuba, made his way to the top of a hi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brownlow, William Gannaway, 1805- (search)
authorities, on a charge of treason against the Confederacy, and confined in Knoxville jail, where he suffered much until released in March, 1862. Then he was senties. At Philadelphia he was joined by his family, who had been expelled from Knoxville, where he published Sketches of the rise, progress, and decline of secession, Tennessee in 1865-69, and United States Senator from 1869 until his death in Knoxville, April 29, 1877. He was a man of fearless spirit, held such a caustic pen, afrom Alabama--was sent out, with some cavalry, with orders, publicly given at Knoxville, not to take him prisoner, but to shoot him at once. Informed of his peril, pass to go into Kentucky under a military escort. He received such a pass at Knoxville. and was about to depart for the Union lines, when he was arrested for treason. By the assurance of safety he had gone to Knoxville for his pass, and so put himself in the hands of his enemies. He and some of the best men in eastern Tennes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell's Station (search)
Campbell's Station A village in Knox county, Tenn., 12 miles southwest of Knoxville, where on Nov. 16, 1863, the National army under General Burnside was attacked by a Confederate force under General Longstreet. The engagement lasted from noon till dark, and resulted in the defeat of the Confederates. The National force comprised portions of the 9th and 23d Corps, with cavalry.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cemeteries, National (search)
84,493 Florence, S C.1992,799 Andersonville, Ga12,793921 Marietta, Ga7,1882,963 Barrancas, Fla 798657 Mobile, Ala756113 Corinth, Miss 1,7893,927 Natchez, Miss3082.780 Vicksburg, Miss3,89612,704 Alexandria, La534772 Baton Rouge, La2,469495 Chalmette, La 6,8375,674 Port Hudson, La5963,223 Brownsville, Tex 1,4171,379 San Antonio, Tex324167 Fayetteville, Ark 431781 Fort Smith, Ark 7111,152 Little Rock, Ark 3,2652,337 Chattanooga, Tenn 7,9994,963 Fort Donelson, Tenn158511 Knoxville, Tenn2,0901,046 Memphis, Tenn 5,1608,817 Nashville, Tenn 11,8254,701 Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.. 1,2292,361 Stone River, Tenn3,8212,324 Camp Nelson, Ky2,4771,165 Cave Hill, Louisville, Ky3,344583 Danville, Ky 3358 Lebanon, Ky 591277 Lexington, Ky805108 Logan's, Ky 345366 Crown Hill, Indianapolis, Ind.68132 New Albany, Ind. 2,139676 Camp Butler, Ill. 1,007355 Mound City, Ill. 2,5052,721 Rock Island, Ill. 27719 Jefferson Barracks, Mo 8,5842,906 Jefferson City, Mo 349412 Springfi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
Salem, Mass. 35,95630,8015,155 Johnstown, Pa35,93621,80514,131 Elmira, N. Y 35,67230,8934,779 Allentown, Pa 35,41625,22810,188 Davenport, Ia35,25426,8728,382 McKeesport, Pa 34,22720,74113,486 Springfield. Ill.34,15924,9639,196 Chelsea, Mass. 34,07227,9096,163 Chester, Pa33,98820,22613,762 York, Pa33,70820,79312,915 Malden, Mass.33,66423,03110,633 Topeka, Kan33.60831,0072,601 Newton, Mass.33,58724,3799,208 Sioux City, la33,11137,806*4,695 Bayonne, N. J.32,72219,03313,689 Knoxville, Tenn32,63722,53510,102 Chattanooga, Tenn32,49029,1003,390 Schenectady, N. Y 31,53119,90211,780 Fitchburg, Mass.31,68222,0379,494 Superior, Wis 31,09111,98319,108 Rockford, Ill. 31,05123,5847,467 Taunton, Mass.31,03625,4485,588 Canton, O 30,66726,1894.478 Butte, Mont30,47010,72319,747 Montgomery, Ala30,34621,8838,463 Auburn, N. Y.30,34525,8584,487 East St. Louis, Ill.29,65515,16914,486 Joliet, Ill.29,35323,2646,089 Sacramento, Cal29,28226,3862,896 Racine, Wis 29,10221,0148,088
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farragut, David Glasgow -1870 (search)
Farragut, David Glasgow -1870 Naval officer; born near Knoxville, Tenn., July 5, 1801; son of George Farragut, who was a native of Minorca; came to America in 1776; entered the Continental army; was a bugler, it is supposed, at the age of seventeen, in the battle of the Cowpens; attained the rank of major; settled in Tennessee; and was master in the United States navy, serving under Patterson in the defence of New Orleans. David entered the navy as midshipman when between nine and ten years of age, first serving under Porter, and was with him in the terrible fight at Valparaiso. He was promoted to commander in 1841, having served faithfully up to that time. Still persevering in duty, he was placed in very responsible positions afloat and ashore, and when the Civil War broke out he was in command of the Brooklyn, steam sloop-of-war. He commanded the naval expedition against New Orleans in the spring of 1862, having the Hartford as his flag-ship. Organizing the West Gulf block
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ferrero, Edward -1899 (search)
y of Virginia, under General Pope, in the summer of 1862. He was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers in September, and was in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. He served in the siege of Vicksburg (1863), and commanded a division at the siege of Knoxville, in defence of Fort Sanders. In the operations against Petersburg he led a division of colored troops, and, Dec. 2, 1864, was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He died in New York City, Dec. 11, 1899.my of Virginia, under General Pope, in the summer of 1862. He was promoted to brigadier-general of volunteers in September, and was in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. He served in the siege of Vicksburg (1863), and commanded a division at the siege of Knoxville, in defence of Fort Sanders. In the operations against Petersburg he led a division of colored troops, and, Dec. 2, 1864, was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He died in New York City, Dec. 11, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foote, Henry Stuart 1800-1880 (search)
Foote, Henry Stuart 1800-1880 Statesman; born in Fauquier county, Va., Sept. 20, 1800; graduated at Washington College in 1819, and admitted to the bar in 1822; removed to Mississippi in 1826, where he entered into active politics while practising his profession. In 1847 he was elected to the United States Senate, and in 1852 was elected governor of the State, his opponent being Jefferson Davis. Mr. Foote was a strong opponent of secession at the Southern Convention held at Knoxville, Tenn., in May, 1859, but when secession was an assured fact he accepted an election to the Confederate Congress, where he was active in his opposition to most of President Davis's measures. He wrote Texas and the Texans (2 volumes); The War of the rebellion, or Scylla and Charybdis, Personal reminiscences, etc. In his day he was a noted duellist. He died in Nashville, Tenn., May 20, 1880.
Glass. The oldest bottle glass manufactory in the United States was established at Glassboro, N. J., in 1775; a cutglass manufactory was established at White's Mill, Pa., in 1852. To-day the United States manufactures more glass of almost every variety than any country in the world.
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