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Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
th We hear heavy skirmishing on the Millwood road, and are ordered to be ready for action. Adjutant Gayle and Sergeant-Major Bruce Davis keep busy carrying such orders from company to company. The Richmond papers bring us the sad news of the fall of Atlanta. It grieves us much. Atlanta is between us and our homes. It is only seventy miles from where my dearly loved mother and sisters live, and all mail communication with them is now cut off. It pains and distresses me to think that La Grange and Greeneville, Georgia, may be visited by raiding parties, and my relatives and friends annoyed and insulted by the cowardly and malicious Yankees, as the noble and unconquered people of the Valley have been. September 8th I received my pay as first lieutenant during months of June, July and August, amounting to $270. Am daily expecting my commission as captain, as Captain McNeely has been retired on account of the wound he received at Chancellorsville, May 3rd, 1863, nearly eighte
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
belief that they were invincible. It will be remembered that after the capture of Selma, on April 2d (which took place at nightfall of the very Sunday that Davis fled from Richmond), and the passage of the victorious cavalry to the south side of the Alabama, their march was directed to the eastward by the way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, moved rapidly in the same direction, by a more northern route, through Jasper, Talladega, and La Grange. The limits of this sketch forbid a detailed narrative of how these gallant troopers captured the last stronghold of the Confederacy, pausing in their march to raise the National flag over the first rebel capitol; how the astonished rebel ladies at the beautiful village of Tuskegee bedecked their horses with flowers as a reward for perfect discipline and good behavior; how they spared one printing press, claimed by a strong-mined woman, upon the condition that she and her descendants, unt
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
ragg. The enemy advanced on our whole line to-day. They assaulted French, Cheatham, Cleburn, Stevenson, and Quarles, by whom they were repulsed. On the rest of the line the skirmishing was severe. Their loss is supposed to be great. Ours is known to be small. J. E. Johnston, General. The dispatch from Gen. Johnston gives an encouraging account of the fight in Georgia. But a dispatch from the West states that reinforcements (20,000) for Sherman's army are marching from La Grange. It is reported and believed that Gen. Early, at the head of 25,000 men, marched out of Staunton on Monday toward the North. I hope it may not prove a recruiting measure for Lincoln! A good deal of firing (cannon) was heard down the river this morning. Judge Campbell is again allowing many persons to pass into the Upited States. June 30 Clear and cool-afterward warm and cloudy. Our people are made wild with joy to-day, upon hearing of the capture of a whole brigade of t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
her of their iron-clad gun-boats, then lying twelve miles below Columbus. In the mean time, La Grange had pushed on to West Point, April 16, 1865. where he found a strong bastioned earth-work, mobridge which crossed the Chattahoochee River, and the little village of West Point. This work La Grange assaulted on three sides, with his men dismounted, at a little past one Fort Tyler. this er destroying nineteen locomotives and three hundred and forty-five loaded cars at West Point, La Grange crossed the river, burned the bridges behind him, and moved on April 17. due east toward Macordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still abseavages of camping armies, or active and destructive raiders. The country between Fairborn and La Grange was a special sufferer by raids. In the vicinity of Newham the gallant Colonel James Brownlow
Brice's Cross Roads Nashville; Major-General A. J. Smith's command. Spanish Fort; Major-General A. J. Smith's command. Fort Blakely. Major-General A. J. Smith's command. Organized December 18, 1862, with Major-General S. A. Hurlbut in command, and was composed of the four divisions of Generals W. S. Smith, Dodge, Kimball, and Lauman. It numbered 50,659, present for duty in April, 1863, with 72,569 present and absent. These troops were stationed in the vicinity of Memphis, La Grange, and Corinth until June, 1863, when the divisions of Smith, Kimball, and Lauman were ordered to Vicksburg in response to Grant's call for re-inforcements, and participated in the investment of that place. This detachment of the corps, while at Vicksburg, was placed under command of Major-General C. C. Washburn. It would be impossible to give anything like a connected history of the Sixteenth Corps from this time on, so many were the changes in its ranks, and so widely were its division
e face of showers of bullets and even of masses of stone hurled down from the heights above them. On the whole they won but little advantage. During the 8th and 9th of May, these operations were continued, the Federals making but little impression on the Confederate stronghold. Meanwhile, on the Dalton road there was a sharp cavalry fight, the Federal commander, General E. M. McCook, having encountered General Wheeler. McCook's advance brigade under Colonel La Grange was defeated and La Grange was made prisoner. Sherman's chief object in these demonstrations, it will be seen, was so to engage Johnston as to prevent his intercepting McPherson in the latter's movement upon Resaca. In this Sherman was successful, and by the 11th he was giving his whole energy to moving the remainder of his forces by the Resaca. The chips are still bright and the earth fresh turned, in the foreground where are the Confederate earthworks such as General Joseph E. Johnston had caused to
e face of showers of bullets and even of masses of stone hurled down from the heights above them. On the whole they won but little advantage. During the 8th and 9th of May, these operations were continued, the Federals making but little impression on the Confederate stronghold. Meanwhile, on the Dalton road there was a sharp cavalry fight, the Federal commander, General E. M. McCook, having encountered General Wheeler. McCook's advance brigade under Colonel La Grange was defeated and La Grange was made prisoner. Sherman's chief object in these demonstrations, it will be seen, was so to engage Johnston as to prevent his intercepting McPherson in the latter's movement upon Resaca. In this Sherman was successful, and by the 11th he was giving his whole energy to moving the remainder of his forces by the Resaca. The chips are still bright and the earth fresh turned, in the foreground where are the Confederate earthworks such as General Joseph E. Johnston had caused to
and finally reached the Union lines at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on May 2d. On April 21st, Grierson had detached a regiment under Colonel Hatch, Second Iowa Cavalry, to destroy the railroad bridge between Columbus and Macon, and then return to La Grange. At Palo Alto, Hatch had a sharp fight with Confederate troops under General Gholson, defeating them without the loss of a man. Much of Hatch's success during his entire raid was due to the fact that his regiment was armed with Colt's revolving rifles. Hatch then retreated along the railroad, destroying it at Okolona and Tupelo, and arriving at La Grange on April 26th, with the loss of but ten troopers. The principal object of his movement — to decoy the Confederate troops to the east, and thus give Grierson ample opportunity to get well under way, was fully attained. Grierson — the raider who puzzled Pemberton To the enterprise of Lytle, the Confederate Secret Service photographer, we owe this portrait of Colonel B. H. Gri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.21 (search)
both physical and mental. There is intense and grievous disappointment felt at only one of thirty officers being chosen for exchange. October 27th Wrote a long letter by Private Watkins, of Fourteenth North Carolina, to my sister in La Grange, Georgia. He promised to conceal it until he can mail it on his arrival at Savannah. Few letters by flag of truce are ever forwarded. October 28th After eating my meagre breakfast, and lying down, discouraged and troubled at my failure to bet. Dr. Knowles took the names of a large number, who are to be sent to Point Lookout, we hopefully suppose for exchange. I am one of the rejoicing number. November 17th, 18th and 19th At the suggestion of Private Henry Curtright, of La Grange, Georgia, a wounded fellow prisoner, I write to Mrs. Joanna, D. C. 178 Preston street. She knows my relations in Georgia well, and may be able to communicate with them for me. A number of nurses and convalescents have been sent to Fort McHenry. I u
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.29 (search)
pectors who examine all letters and condemn hundreds of them, or I would never have been permitted to receive it. Sam says it is bitter cold at Elmira, and he has but one blanket. They have snows several feet deep. Poor Dick Noble, from Big hungry, near Tuskegee, died a prisoner at Elmira. He was a faithful fellow. A kind letter was received, too, from Mr. J. W. Fellows, of Manchester, New Hampshire, who, with Professor William Johns, prepared me for college at Brownwood Institute, La Grange, Georgia, in 1859. He is now practicing law, and is an uncompromising Democrat. He has lived among the Southern people, formed friendships there, and understands their peculiar institution — slavery. His letter is very kind and full of sympathy, and he offers to aid me. Alfred Parkins, of Winchester, a prisoner in the Bull pen, as the quarters of the privates is designated, came to see Lieutenant Arrington, having as a guard over him a coal-black, brutal-looking negro soldier, an escaped con
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