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The Daily Dispatch: August 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Las Cruces (New Mexico, United States) or search for Las Cruces (New Mexico, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

ion, Newtown secession, died August 29th, 1861. The remains were taken possession of by the Williamsburg delegation, who brought it home with them, and threw it in the river at the foot of Grand street. The proceedings, though not very orderly, were extremely enthusiastic and patriotic. Intelligence was received at Washington, from Independence, Mo., that the United States troops, seven hundred and fifty in number, who surrendered to three hundred Texan Rangers, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore, had been released on parole, the Texans retaining their arms and the horses belonging to the Mounted Rifles. Gen. Wm. Pelham, formerly Surveyor-General of New Mexico, and Col. Clements, were arrested at Santa Fe, and confined in the guard-house, by order of Col. Canby, of the Department of New Mexico. They were suspected of giving improper information to the Texas troops of Fort Bliss, below El Paso. Col. Clements took the oath of allegiance, and was discharged. Gen. Pelham refuse
October 19. Colonel Morgan, with two hundred and twenty men of the Eighteenth Missouri regiment, with two pieces of artillery, had a fight with some four hundred rebels, on Big Hurricane Creek, in Carroll County, Mo., killing fourteen, taking eight prisoners, and putting the balance to flight. Colonel Morgan had fourteen men wounded, two mortally.--(Doc. 98.) The Leavenworth (Kansas) Conservative of this date gives an account of the surrender of Fort Fillmore, New Mexico, as follows:-- On the 5th of July, Major Lynde had command of seven companies of infantry and two of cavalry, in all about seven hundred men. The next officers in rank were Captains Potter and Stevenson and Lieut. McAnnelly. On the 24th of July, at three o'clock P. M., four hundred and eighty men, with four pieces of artillery, started for Mesilla; arrived there at dark; were drawn up in line of battle between two cornfields; there were no flankers and no skirmishers out; the cavalry were within eight
tances, is only to proclaim a war of extermination, in which both sides will suffer uselessly. The cry of extermination, black-flag, and no quarter, is shouted most vociferously by some who are evading any kind of war. People who fight are willing enough to accept a war of rules, as long as possible; and if they catch thieves and incendiaries, they can readily discriminate against them in favor of prisoners of war. Major Isaac Lynde, Seventh U. S. Infantry, for abandoning his post--Fort Fillmore, New Mexico--on the 27th of July, 1861, and subsequently surrendering his command to an inferior force of insurgents, was, by direction of the President of the United States, dropped from the rolls of the army from this date.--General Orders, No. 102. A party of the Ninth Iowa regiment. on a scout, near Pacific City, Mo., overtook a body of rebels who had stolen a herd of cattle, hogs, and sheep from the Union men in the neighborhood, and succeeded in dispersing them, with one kill
December 27. Intelligence was received at Washington that Col. Canby, in command of the military department of New Mexico, had retaken Forts Craig and Stanton, on the Masilla border, driving the Texans away, and was on the way to Fort Fillmore to dispossess the rebels at that post, which was traitorously surrendered by Colonel Lynde to an inferior force of Texans. Thence he intended marching into Arizona to drive off the rebels.--The Legislature of New Mexico met on the 2d of December. Governor Connelly, in his message, recommended active measures with reference to the Indians who had been tampered with by Albert Pike, suggesting that they be located on the reservations, and encouraged in agricultural pursuits. The Indians, for the greater part, were peaceable and friendly to the United States Government.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 28. The burning of buildings near New Market Bridge, Va., by order of Brigadier-General Mansfield, called forth the following order from Gener
recognizing the desirability of referring all national disputes to impartial arbitration for settlement, respectfully urges the government of this country to immediately cooperate with other European Powers in recommending to the contending parties in America the above plan as the simplest and most satisfactory method of reestablishing peace, and in their negotiations strongly recommend the abolition of slavery. The rebel expedition to New Mexico, under Colonel Sibley, was met near Fort Fillmore, by a body of California troops under the command of Colonel Canby. A battle ensued, in which the rebels were routed. Colonel Sibley was assassinated by his own men, who charged him with drunkenness and inefficiency. Captain Faulkner, with a body of rebel cavalry, encamped in a swamp near Trenton, Tenn., was surprised by a detachment of the Second Illinois cavalry, losing thirty killed and twenty wounded.--Col. McNeill with a force of one thousand National troops defeated the rebe