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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 171 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 84 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 60 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) or search for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 15 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
een for Florida. At night the city blazed with fireworks, the favorite pieces being the Southern cross and the Lone Star. The convention had voted against the reopening of the slave-trade, and adjourned on Jan. 30, 1861. A week before the Secession Ordinance was adopted, volunteer troops, in accordance with an arrangement made with the governors of Louisiana and Georgia, and by order of the governor of Alabama, had seized the arsenal at Mount Vernon, about 30 miles above Mobile, and Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. The Mount Vernon arsenal was captured by four Confederate companies commanded by Captain Leadbetter, of the United States Engineer Corps, and a native of Maine. At dawn (Jan. 4, 1861) they surprised Captain Reno, who was in command of the arsenal, and the Alabama Confederates thus obtained 15,000 stands of arms. 150, 000 pounds of gunpowder, some cannon, and a large quantity of munitions of war. The Alabama Senators a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Richard, 1828- (search)
Arnold, Richard, 1828- Military officer; born in Providence, R. I., April 12, 1828; was graduated at West Point in 1850. He served in Florida, California, at the battle of Bull Run, on the Peninsula, and was made chief of artillery of Banks's expedition in November, 1862. At Port Hudson and in the Red River campaign he rendered important service; also in the capture of Fort Fisher, and of Fort Morgan, near Mobile. He was brevetted major-general United States army in 1866. He died on Governor's Island, New York, Nov. 8, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bowyer, Fort, attack it upon. (search)
Bowyer, Fort, attack it upon. At the entrance to Mobile Bay, 30 miles from the village of Mobile, was Fort Bowyer (afterwards Fort Morgan), occupying the extremity of a narrow cape on the eastern side of the entrance, and commanding the channelFort Morgan), occupying the extremity of a narrow cape on the eastern side of the entrance, and commanding the channel between it and Fort Dauphin opposite. It was a small work, in semicircular form towards the channel, without bomb-proofs, and mounting only twenty guns, nearly all of them 12-pounders. It was the chief defence of Mobile; and in it Jackson, on his She was set on fire by her friends, and at midnight her magazine exploded. The British, who had brought to bear upon Fort Bowyer ninety-two pieces of artillery, and arrayed over 1,300 men against a garrison of 130, were repulsed with a loss of 232-two pieces of artillery, and arrayed over 1,300 men against a garrison of 130, were repulsed with a loss of 232 men, of whom 162 were killed. The loss of the Americans was four men killed and four wounded. See Mobile, Ala.; forts Morgan and Gaines.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- (search)
Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- Naval officer; born in Bradford, Vt., Aug. 10, 1843; was Charles Edgar Clark. trained in the naval academy in 1860-63, becoming ensign in the latter year. In 1863-65 he served on the sloop Ossipee, and participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, and the bombardment of Fort Morgan, Aug. 23. He was promoted lieutenant in 1867; lieutenantcommander in 1868; commander in 1881; and captain, June 21, 1896; and was given command of the Monterey. He held this post till March, 1898, when he was given command of the battle-ship Oregon, then at San Francisco, under orders to hurry her around Cape Horn to the vicinity of Cuba. He made the now famous run of 14,000 miles to Key West in sixty-five days, arriving at his destination on May 26. This was the longest and quickest trip of any battle-ship afloat. Despite her long voyage, the Oregon immediately joined Admiral Sampson's squadron. Captain Clark's excellent discipline was evident in the effe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines, Fort. (search)
Gaines, Fort. See Mobile, Ala.; forts Morgan and Gaines.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mobile, Ala. (search)
soon abandoned and another was begun and finished on Mobile Point and called Fort Bowyer, in honor of the brave lieutenant-colonel of that name. Such was the beginnwas Fort Gaines, commanding the main entrance; and southeasterly from it was Fort Morgan, a still stronger work, with a light-house near it. These forts the Confedetween the forts, and delivering terrific broadsides of grapeshot, first upon Fort Morgan. The monitor Tecumseh, which led the National vessels, was struck by the exy under the guns of the fort. Under cover of night one of them Capture of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay. escaped to Mobile. Believing the battle over at dusk, Farraged by land and water the next day, and the three were surrendered, the last (Fort Morgan) on the morning of Aug. 23. With this victory the government came into poss eastern side of the bay. The 13th Army Corps began a march on the 17th from Fort Morgan over a swampy region in heavy rain, and the 16th Corps crossed the bay from
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of (search)
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. TFort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fi ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nicholson, James William Augustus 1821-1887 (search)
Nicholson, James William Augustus 1821-1887 Naval officer; born in Dedham, Mass., March 10, 1821; entered the navy as midshipman in 1838; was acting master during the war with Mexico; and promoted rear-admiral in 1881. In the Civil War, during the engagement with the Confederate ram Tennessee, his vessel, the Manhattan, fired the only shots which pierced the former's armor plate. In August, 1864, he bombarded Fort Morgan and compelled it to surrender. In July, 1882, when the British fleet bombarded Alexandria, Egypt, he was present as commander of the European Station. After the action he sent 100 marines ashore to protect the consulate of the United States. His conduct throughout the bombardment received high commendation in Europe as well as the United States. He died in New York City, Oct. 28, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Reynolds, Joseph Jones 1822-1899 (search)
Reynolds, Joseph Jones 1822-1899 Military officer; born in Flemingsburg, Ky., Jan. 4, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1843, where he was assistant professor from 1846 to 1855. He entered the service in the Civil War as colonel of the 10th Indiana Volunteers, and was made a brigadier-general in May, 1861. He was at first active in western Virginia, and then in the Army of the Cumberland, 1862-63. He was Rosecrans's chief of staff in the battle of Chickamauga, and in the summer of 1864 commanded the 19th Army Corps, and organized a force for the capture of Forts Morgan and Gaines, near Mobile. Late in 1864 he was placed in command of the Department of Arkansas, where he remained until April, 1866. In March, 1867, he was brevetted major-general, United States army; in 1867-72 commanded the 5th Military District; in 1871 was elected United States Senator from Texas, but declined; and in 1877 was retired. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 26, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 (search)
vens being added by legislative enactment in 1815. He entered the United States navy in 1808, and was made lieutenant in July, 1813. In 1812 he volunteered for lake service, and in December he was severely wounded by a canistershot through his hand while storming a battery at Black Rock, near Buffalo. In the summer of 1813 he superintended the fitting and rigging of Perry's fleet at Erie, and in the battle, Sept. 10, he commanded the sloop Trippe, behaving gallantly. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 22, 1841. Naval officer; born in Middletown, Conn., May 27, 1819; son of the preceding; entered the navy in 1836; was active in operations on the Southern coast, and in movements against Mobile in the Civil War. He was specially distinguished in operations against Forts Wagner and Sumter in 1863, and in the capture of the Confederate fleet and of Fort Morgan in the summer of 1864. He was promoted rear-admiral in 1879; retired in 1881. He died in Rockville, Md., May 15, 1896.
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