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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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had occasion to learn this. In drilling them in a charge at full gallop over the rough and uneven plains, sometimes covered by ditches, it was rarely one was unhorsed. But the prejudice against them among the white officers of the service was at first fearful, especially among the regulars. Now they have become a part of the army of the United States; and as I write, the Ninth (colored) Cavalry, for good conduct in the field against the Indians, and for high soldierly bearing, are at Fort Myers near Washington, by the order of the War Department, exhibited to all comers as instances of the best qualities of the American cavalry troops. After I left New Orleans, General Banks enlisted many more of them, but was weak enough to take away from them the great object of their ambition, under the, spur of which they were ready to fight to the death, namely, equality with the white soldiers. He was also unmanly enough to add injustice to that folly by taking the commissions from thei
titution by C. A. Schott, Esq.:— Brunswick, Me44.68 Hanover, N. H.40.32 Burlington, Vt.34.15 New Bedford, Mass41.42 Providence, R. I.41.54 Fort Columbus, N. Y. Harbor43.24 Penn Yan, N. Y.28.42 Buffalo, N. Y.33.84 Newark, N. J.44.85 Philadelphia, Pa44.05 Pittsburgh, Pa37.09 Washington, D. C.37.52 Baltimore, Md. (Fort McHenry)41.10 Fortress Monroe, Va.47.04 White sulphur Springs, Va37.54 Gaston, N. C.43.40 Charleston, S. C.43.63 Savannah, Ga.48.32 Key West, Fla.36.23 Fort Myers, Fla.56.55 Mt. Vernon Arsenal, Ala.66.14 Huntsville, Ala54.88 Natchez, Miss.53.55 New Orleans, La51.05 Baton Rouge, La60.16 Fort Brown. Texas33.44 Fort Bliss, Texas9.56 Fort Smith, Ark40.36 Washington. Ark54.50 Springdale, Ky.48.58 Marietta, Ohio42.70 Cleveland. Ohio37.61 Detroit. Mich.30.05 Mackinac, Mich.23.96 Richmond, Ind.43.32 Peoria, Ill41.25 Milwaukee, Wis.30.40 Fort Snelling, Minn.25.11 Muscatine, Iowa42.88 St. Louis, Mo.42.18 Fort Gibson, Ind. Ter.36.37 Fort
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Florida, 1864 (search)
-23: Exp. from Fernadina to Woodstock, and King's Ferry MillPENNSYLVANIA--97th Infantry. Feb. 20: Skirmish, Pease CreekFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. Feb. 20: Attack on Fort MyersFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Detachment). NEW YORK--110th Infantry (Detachment). Feb. 20: Battle, Olustee or Ocean PondCONNECTICUT--7th Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--4th Cavth and 157th Infantry. OHIO--75th and 107th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--Battery "A," 3d Arty. UNITED STATES--3d, 7th and 35th Colored Infantry. July 1-4: Exp. from Fort Myers to BayportFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Detachment). UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry (Detachment). July 6: Skirmish, Station Four, near Cedar KeysFLORIDA--2d Cavalryissing. Total, 148. Aug. 17: Skirmish, South NewportConfederate Reports. Aug. 21: Skirmish, Fort TaylorUNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. Aug. 26: Skirmish, Fort MyersFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. Aug. 29: Skirmish, MiltonIOWA--19th Infantry (Detachment). FLORIDA--1st Battery Light Arty. (Detachment). MAINE--2d Cavalry (Detachment).
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Florida, 1865 (search)
hn's River(No Reports.) Feb. 5: Action, Braddocks' Farm near WelakaFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Cos. "B," "H"). Union loss, 1 killed, 1 wounded, 34 missing. Total, 36. Feb. 13: Action, Station FourFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. Union loss, 6 killed, 17 wounded, 2 missing. Total, 25. Feb. 16: Skirmish near Cedar KeysUNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. Union loss, 6 killed, 3 missing. Total, 9. Feb. 19: Exp. from Barrancas to MiltonMAINE--2d Cavalry. Feb. 20: Attack on Fort MyersFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Detachment). NEW YORK--110th Infantry (Detachment). UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry (Detachment). Union loss, 5 killed, 1 missing. Total, 6. Feb. 21-March 7: Operations near St. Mark'sFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d and 99th Colored Infantry. Feb. 22-25: Exp. from Barrancas to MiltonMAINE--2d Cavalry. March 4-5: Skirmishes, East River BridgeFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. March 5-6: Skirmishes, Newport BridgeFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UN
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Florida Volunteers. (search)
o District of Key West and Tortugas, Dept. of the Gulf, and Dept. of Florida, to November, 1865. Service. Duty at Fort Myers, Cedar Keys and in District of Key West till June, 1865. Skirmishes at Pease Creek, Florida, February 13-14 and February 20, 1864. Attack on Fort Myers February 20. Affair at Tampa May 6. Operations on West Coast of Florida July 1-31. Expedition to Bayport July 1-4. Skirmish at Station Four, near Cedar Keys, July 6. Expedition to St. Andrews Bay July 20-29. Fort Myers August 26. Expedition to Bayport October 1, and to St. Andrews Bay October 20-29. Near Magnolia October 24. Expedition to Otter Creek, on Florida R. R., October 30-31. Braddock's Farm, near Welaka, February 5, 1865. Station Four, near Cedar Keys, February 13. Attack on Fort Myers February 20. Operations near St. Marks February 21-March 7. East River Bridge March 4-5. Newport Bridge March 5-6. Natural Bridge March 6. Occupation of Tampa M
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
son, La., May 30. Siege of Port Hudson June 3-July 9. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Duty at Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana (Teche) Campaign October 3-November 30. Vermillionville November 11. Duty at New Iberia till January 7, 1864. Moved to Franklin January 7, thence to Key West, Florida, February, 1864, and garrison duty at Fort Jefferson till August, 1865. Attack on Fort Myers, Florida, February 20, 1865 (Detachment). Mustered out August 28, 1865. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 14 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 191 Enlisted men by disease. Total 210. 111th New York Regiment Infantry. Organized at Auburn, N. Y., and mustered in August 20, 1862. Left State for Harper's Ferry, W. Va., August 21, 1862. Attached to Miles' Command, Harper's Ferry, to September, 1862. Camp Douglass, Chicago, Ill., to December,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
866. Service. Duty at New Orleans, La., and Ship Island, Miss., till February 13, 1864. Ordered to Key West, Florida, February 13. Affair at Tampa, Florida, May 5. Operations on West Coast of Florida July 1-31. Expedition from Fort Myers to Bayport July 1-4. Expedition from Cedar Key to St. Andrew's Bay July 20-29. Fort Taylor August 21. Station No. 4 February 13, 1865. Attack on Fort Myers February 20. Operations in the vicinity of St. Mark's February 21-March 7Fort Myers February 20. Operations in the vicinity of St. Mark's February 21-March 7. East River Bridge March 4-5. Newport Bridge March 5-6. Natural Bridge March 6. Duty in District of Florida till January, 1866. Mustered out January 5, 1866. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 24 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 11 Officers and 135 Enlisted men by disease. Total 173. 3rd United States Colored Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp William Penn, near Philadelphia, Pa., August 3-10, 1863. Ordered to Dept. of the South. Attached to
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 6: in Florida, 1856-57, and the Seminoles (search)
rm as that of a summer evening in the highlands of the Hudson. General Harney, the department commander, was then at Fort Myers and wished me to report to him there. The steamer swayed back and forth, tugging at her anchor, and, weary as I was, Ioff in a skiff. Against a head wind we made our way, and at last, between eight and nine o'clock at night, landed at Fort Myers. How kind the officers were in those days to one another I Lieutenant W. W. Burns, though he had never seen me before,to improve his administration of affairs, whether commanding an expedition or a department. The next morning we left Fort Myers to return to Tampa. In the small boat were General Harney, Captain Pleasonton, Dr. McLaren, the surgeon, eight soldier him to take his tribe and join the remainder of his people in the Far West. I undertook the mission, first going to Fort Myers and getting the interpreter, Natto Joe, and an Indian woman with her child, who was still detained at that post. This
held by them, a valuable stronghold, where they could concentrate troops and at any time advance with a force of 15,000 to 20,000 troops into the heart of the country, our forces having been greatly depleted by the call of troops to Virginia and the western army. In the winter of 1863 Captain Dickison was ordered to Fort Meade to act in concert with Colonel Brevard, who was sent to take command of a battalion near that point as the enemy was in considerable force in the neighborhood of Fort Myers. At this critical time the enemy, learning of the scattered state of our troops and being strongly fortified by reinforcements from Hilton Head, made rapid preparations for an invasion of the State, anticipating an easy capture of Lake City, a permanent occupation of that region and a triumphant march on to Tallahassee, the capital, where they could be in communication with the Federal forces at the Gulf ports. With such co-operation the whole State would be occupied by the Federal army
Rassa and Key West, to land in the neighborhood of St. Marks and, in conjunction with a naval force, ascend the river. Landing their forces of cavalry, infantry and artillery at the lighthouse, they marched to Newport and, finding that the bridge had been burned, advanced about 8 miles further up to the Natural Bridge, where some of our troops had taken position and were ready to meet them. This was a surprise to the enemy, as the opinion prevailed that our forces were so scattered from Fort Myers to the extreme western border of the State that it would be an opportune time for a successful expedition. Our troops made a most gallant and determined charge, repulsing the Federals at every point until they were forced to fall back to their gunboats, sustaining a very heavy loss. In this engagement the negro troops were commanded by Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, who a few weeks previous had been completely defeated and routed by Dickison's command and the militia forces at No. 4, near Cedar
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