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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 33 document sections:

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n Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. Second.--That the said seceding States appoint, by their respective Conventions or Legislatures, as many delegates as they have representatives in the present Congress of the United States, to the said Convention to be held at Montgomery ; and that on the adoption of the Constitution of the Southern Confederacy, the vote shall be by States. Third.--That whenever the terms of the Constitution shall be agreed upon by the said Convention, the same shall be submitted at as early a day as practicable to the Convention and Legislature of each State, respectively, so as to enable them to ratify or reject the said Constitution. Fourth.--That in the opinion of South Carolina, the
n withdrawing from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and the determination of the President to maintain that fearless officer in his present condition; and we will support the President in all constitutional measures to enforce the laws and preserve the Union. To-day the arrest of Senators Toombs and Wigfall, on the charges of treason, for sending dispatches to the South recommending the seizure of the forts, was spoken of in the Cabinet jocularly. The Alabama Convention organized at Montgomery, William M. Brooks in the chair.--Times, Jan. 8. The Mississippi Convention organized at Jacksonville, A. J. Barry, of Lowndes, in the chair. It was resolved that a committee of fifteen be appointed by the president, with instructions to prepare and report, as speedily as possible, an ordinance of secession, providing for the immediate withdrawal of Mississippi from the Federal Union, with a view of establishing a new Confederacy, to be composed of the seceding States.--Mobile Advert
as 61, nays 39. The Alabama Convention was far from unanimous; a large part of that State is decidedly opposed to extreme measures. The Alabama ordinance of secession calls upon the people of all the Southern States to meet in convention at Montgomery, on the 4th of February next, for the purpose of forming a provisional or permanent government. Immediately after the passage of the ordinance, an immense mass meeting was held in front of the capitol; a secession flag, presented, by the women of Montgomery, was raised on the State House, cannon were fired, guns fired, etc., and in the evening the whole town was illuminated.--(Doc. 19.)--Evening Post, Jan. 12. Judge Jones, of the United States District Court, this afternoon announced from the windows of the court-room in the custom-house building, at Mobile, that the United States Court for the Southern District of Alabama was adjourned forever. Mr. George M. Brewer, of the same place, gave one hundred cords of wood for the u
Feb. 8. The Congress at Montgomery this evening unanimously agreed to a constitution and provisional government. They will go into immediate operation.--(Doc. 83.)--No propositions for compromise or reconstruction. After the vote on the constitution was taken, Jefferson Davis was elected President, and Alexander H. Stevens Vice-President of the Southern Confederacy, by the Congress.--(Doc. 34.)--Commercial Advertiser. Brigs W. R. Kibby and Golden Lead; barks Adjuster and C. Colden Murray; and schooner Julia A. Hallock, all owned in New York, were seized in the harbor of Savannah, by order of the Governor of Georgia, in reprisal for the seizure, in New York, of arms consigned to Georgia.--Baltimore American. The Little Rock arsenal, Arkansas, with 9,000 stands of arms, 40 cannon, and a large amount of ammunition, was surrendered to the State of Arkansas.--N. Y. Times, Feb. 11.
Feb. 9. At Montgomery, Mr. Memminger presented a flag sent by some of the young ladies of South Carolina to the Convention.--(Doc. 35.)--National Intelligencer.
Feb. 21. The President of the Southern Confederacy nominated the following members of his Cabinet: Secretary of State--Mr. Toombs. Secretary of the Treasury--Mr. Memminger. Secretary of War--Mr. L. Pope Walker. They were confirmed.--Tribune, Feb. 22. Governor Brown, at Savannah, Ga., seized the ship Martha J. Ward, bark Adjuster, and brig Harold, all belonging to citizens of New York. They will be detained until the arms are delivered up by the State of New York. The Congress at Montgomery passed an act declaring the establishment of the free navigation of the Mississippi.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 23.
e authorities in Charleston, it is said, that Mr. Fox employed this opportunity to devise and concert with Major Anderson a plan to supply the fort by force; and that this plan was adopted by the United States Government.--Times, March 23 and April 13. A meeting was held at Frankfort, Alan,, at which the following resolutions, among others of a similar character, were passed: Resolved, That we approve the course pursued by our delegates, Messrs. Watkins and Steele, in convention at Montgomery, in not signing the so-called secession ordinance. That secession is inexpedient and unnecessary, and we are opposed to it in any form, and the more so since a majority of the slave States have refused to go out, either by what is called southern cooperation, or precipitate secession; and that the refusal to submit the so-called secession ordinance to the decision of the people is an outrage upon our right and liberty, and manifests a spirit of assumption, unfairness, and dictatorship.
e responsibility. They charge the Administration with gross perfidy, insisting that under the shelter of the pretext and assertion that Fort Sumter was to be evacuated, an immense armada has been despatched to provision and reinforce that fort. They repeat they had almost daily indirect assurances from the Administration that Fort Sumter was positively to be abandoned, and that all the Government's efforts were to be directed toward peace. The commissioners allege that the Government at Montgomery was earnestly desirous of peace; and that, in accordance with its instructions, as well as their own feelings, they left no means unexhausted to secure that much-desired end; but all their efforts having failed, they were now forced to return to an outraged people with the object of their mission unaccomplished; and they express the firm conviction that war is inevitable.--(Doc. 51.)--World, April 12. At 2 P. M. Colonel Chesnut and Major Lee, aids to General Beauregard, conveyed to Fo
to be afforded for their removal to any post in the United States the commander might elect. No men were hurt in Sumter by the fire of the enemy. It is reported by the secessionists that no men were either killed or wounded upon their side. A boat from the United States squadron outside, with a flag of truce, arrived at Morris' Island, with a request to be allowed to come and take Major Anderson and his forces.--(Doc. 52.)--Tribune, Times, Herald, and World. A Despatch from Montgomery, Ala., says that Fort Pickens was reinforced last night.--(Doc. 53.) To-day the President expelled from the Federal army, for refusing to act on a particular service, Captain William B. St. Johns, of the Third Infantry, and First Lieutenant Abner Smead, of the First Artillery. The Legislature of Pennsylvania passed the war bill without amendment last evening. Previous to its passage, the news of the bombardment of Fort Sumter was announced, and produced a profound sensation. The b
erfected to throw in 300 men and supplies by boats at daylight on the 13th. This was frustrated, however, by the Baltic running upon Rattlesnake shoal on the night of the 12th.--World, April 19. Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania, were added to the Military Department of Washington.--(Doc. 68.)--Times, April 25. A positive announcement that General Scott had resigned his position in the army of the United States and tendered his sword to his native State--Virginia, was made at Montgomery. At Mobile, one hundred guns were fired in honor of his resignation.--Charleston Mercury, April 22. Immense Union meetings were held last night at Auburn, Hudson, Ogdensburgh, Albion, Binghamton, and other towns and villages in western New York. Past political differences are forgotten, and the people are enthusiastic in support of the Administration.--Troy Times. At New York a large American flag, forty feet long by twenty wide, was flung but upon a flagstaff from a window in
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