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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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ille, having succeeded in making treaties with the Indians, sailed up the Alabama river, passed the present location of Montgomery and established Fort Toulouse, at the site of the present town of Wetumpka. Later, a settlement was made at MontgomeryFort Toulouse, at the site of the present town of Wetumpka. Later, a settlement was made at Montgomery, and Fort Tombecbee was established at what is now called Jones' Bluff. Fort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killedMontgomery, and Fort Tombecbee was established at what is now called Jones' Bluff. Fort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killed their commander and deserted the garrison. In 1719, France was at war with Spain, and on May 4th Lord Bienville attacked Pensacola, captured the garrison and sent the captives to Havana. Later, during the summer, Matamora, the Spanish governor oFort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killed their commander and deserted the garrison. In 1719, France was at war with Spain, and on May 4th Lord Bienville attacked Pensacola, captured the garrison and sent the captives to Havana. Later, during the summer, Matamora, the Spanish governor of Cuba, retook Pensacola. The Spaniards landed on Dauphin island and bombarded Fort Filippe, but were repulsed by Sevigny, whose command consisted of 260 soldiers and 200 Indians. The French fleet arrived, Pensacola was again retaken by the French
ed widespread terror and alarm. The prevailing sentiment on every side was that prompt action was essential to protect lives and property. As early as 1848 this aggression on the rights of the South had become such a menace that John C. Calhoun contended that we ought to force the issue of the slavery question in the North; and said, moreover, We are now stronger, relatively, than we shall be hereafter politically and morally. The Democratic party of Alabama assembled in convention at Montgomery, January 11, 1860, and with scarcely a dissenting voice adopted resolutions in substance as follows: That the principles recognized by the Supreme court in the Dred Scott case should be maintained by the South; that their delegates to the approaching national Democratic convention at Charleston should present these resolutions for the adoption of that body; that they insist upon the adoption of the resolutions in substance, and that if they be not adopted, the delegates must withdraw. T
ld on December 24th. The convention met on January 7, 1861, in the hall of representatives at Montgomery. Of the 100 men composing this body, many afterward proved their devotion to their State on tlabama by their delegates in convention on the 4th day of February, A. D. 1861, at the city of Montgomery in the State of Alabama, for the purpose of consulting with each other as to the most effectua in said resolutions. Done by the people of the State of Alabama in convention assembled at Montgomery, on this, the 11th day of January, A. D. 1861. During December and January, Governor Moore to destroy everything which could benefit the Confederate cause. General Wilson proceeded to Montgomery, which he occupied April 12th, and then resumed his march into Georgia. Meanwhile General Cwhen the war broke out. Late in April, 1861, he returned home and reported at once for duty at Montgomery. He was commissioned as first lieutenant of artillery in the Confederate army and ordered to
The Fifth Alabama regiment was organized at Montgomery, May 5, 1861. Its first duty was at Pensacoeventeenth Alabama infantry was organized at Montgomery, August, 186. Serving first at Pensacola, i infantry. This regiment was organized at Montgomery, November, 1861, and armed by private enterparmed by private enterprise and organized at Montgomery in November, 861; first served at Mobile ands that O'Neal's Alabama regiment is to go to Montgomery. (726) Special order, No. 36—Colonel Swaon was organized during the fall of 1861, at Montgomery. In February, 1862, two companies were addeeed with his brigade to Augusta, Ga., via Montgomery, Ala. The Thirty-Eighth Alabama infantry. y detached from Buford's command and sent to Montgomery for provost duty, when it was sent to the arle and ordered to report to General Adams at Montgomery. No. 104—(364) Mentioned as at Montgomery, onfederate cavalry. The Legion proceeded to Montgomery nearly 3,000 strong, under the command of Co[10 more.
detached companies References to their services in the official Records. The First Alabama cavalry was organized at Montgomery, November, 1861, under Col. J. H. Clanton. It was ordered to Tennessee, and was at Jackson, Tenn., March 6, 1862; ordebruary 25th, by order of General Stewart. The Second Alabama cavalry. The Second Alabama cavalry was organized at Montgomery in May, 1862; was in north Alabama for a short time and was then sent to Florida, where it was employed for a time; sen Clanton's brigade, Western division, department of the Gulf, General Maury commanding, August 1, 1863. August 10th, Montgomery, Ala.; at Pollard, September 19th. (562) In Jenifer's brigade, army of Mobile, December 31, 1863. No. 57—(333) Transfete Oak to Rocky mountain, February 26th. No. 103—(433) Mentioned in Colonel Cooper's (Union) report of skirmish near Montgomery, April 13, 1865. (970) Ordered to Plymouth, February 13th. (993, 994) Attached to General Starke's brigade, Fe
cember 10, 1864. No. 103—(1047) In Gee's battalion, Mobile, March 10, 1865. Montgomery True Blues battery. The Montgomery True Blues battery, Capt. W. G. Andrews, was organized at Norfolk in January, 1863, and was composed of men from Montgomery, most of whom had served in a campaign in the Third Alabama infantry. They were sent to North Carolina and did garrison duty on the coast. They assisted in the capture of Plymouth, and blew up Fort Branch. When the Confederate line at Peters722) Mentioned in Gen. E. C. Walthall's report, December 1st. No. 103—(1047) At Mobile, in Maury's army, March 10, 1865. No. 104—(1195) Mentioned by General Gibson, Mobile, April 3d. Semple's battery. Semple's battery was organized in Montgomery, March, 1862. It was ordered first to Mobile and afterward to the army of Tennessee, and was brigaded under Lowrey, Deshler, Woods, and in Cleburne's and Cheatham's corps. It was for a time in Hotchkiss' battalion. It marched into Kentu
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
oosa, Ala., April 4. Col. Garland; loss 150 m.—Federal, Gen. Wilson. Alabama troops, corps of cadets. Sipsey Swamp, 1Ala., April 6. Gen. Wirt Adams.—Federal, Gen. Wilson; loss; 4 k, 24 w, 30 m. Alabama troops, Adams' Cav. and reserves. Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9. Gen. Liddell; loss 500 k and w, 2100 m.—Federal, Gen. Canby, 31,000; loss Losses of Mobile campaign. 189 k, 1201 w, 27 m. Alabama troops, Thomas' boy reserves, 6th Cav., Tarrant's Batty., 15th Cont. Cav. Montgomery, Ala., April 12-13. Loss 50 m.—Federal, Gen. Wilson. Alabama troops, several companies of militia. Near Raleigh, Hillsboro Rd., Morrisville, Chapel Hill Rd., Creek near Chapel Hill, N. C., April 12 to 15. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 68.—Federal, total loss 290. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., 3d, 10th Conf. Cav. Fort Tyler, Ala., April 16. Gen. R. C. Tyler, 265; loss 19 k, 28 w, 218 m.—Federal, Gen. Wilson; loss 7 k, 29 w. Alabama troops, boys and convales
to Alabama in 1818 and became a planter near Montgomery. His mother was a Miss Sayre, sister of Danh headquarters at Mobile, and the Second, at Montgomery. The Tuskegee light infantry was assigned tia, S. C., February 13, 1806. He went to Montgomery, Ala., in 1823, and made that city his home ford to the bar in 1850 he opened his office in Montgomery. In 1855 he was a representative of that co-Union officer. His remains were carried to Montgomery, the capital of Alabama, where they lay in sthere he went back to Alabama and resided in Montgomery, where his wife died. This estimable lady wr brother did not enter. In 1854 he went to Montgomery and began the study of law in the office ofion of the war, continued to practice law in Montgomery until his death. He answered the first callard Taylor, in May, 1865. Returning then to Montgomery, he again took up the practice of law. In 18y part of 1864 he was in district command at Montgomery, and in July he was put in command of the re[4 more...]