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This is a small matter to trouble you with, and I hate grumblers so much that I dislike to make any complaint; but, if service is to be promptly and efficiently performed, the means should not be withheld. In a letter addressed to Colonel B. F. Lamed, paymaster-general, April 8, 1852, General Johnston says: I have the honor to report that the district to which I have been assigned has been paid to the 29th February last. It is constituted as follows: Fort Graham, Brazos River; Fort Worth, Clear Fork of the Trinity; Belknap, Salt Fork of the Brazos; and the post on the Clear Fork of the Brazos. The distance traveled in making the payment was 7830 miles; time — from 29th February to 3d April-thirty-five days, under favorable circumstances. The country is elevated, the greater portion being a succession of ranges of high hills, intersected with numerous streams, the crossing of which is always troublesome, and often produces delay in the journey. The march is commenced at
with many others of a similar character, has confirmed me in my belief, and which I think will serve to illustrate the truth of your sermon. As the paymaster of this department of our army, I have for the last four years visited Fort Croghan, Fort Worth, and other garrisons in Texas, regularly once in three months, to pay our troops. I have generally had the same escort of soldiers whom I can trust. I have had the same ambulance, the same mules, and the same driver; and, during each quarterly trip between Fort Croghan and Fort Worth, I have invariably camped about one hour before sunset under a certain post-oak tree, near a fine spring, at the end of my first day's journey from Fort Croghan. The mules were so accustomed to the spot that, whenever I reached it, they went to the oak-tree, and turned the wagon around in a position suitable for unloading and pitching the tent under it. I used the body of the tree as a support for the tent, one end of which was fastened to it. In order
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 40: social relations and incidents of Cabinet life, 1853-57. (search)
considered as favorably as the emergencies of the service will permit. Very truly yours, Jefferson Davis. One charming young fellow, who was the best dancer of his day, went to a surgeon for a certificate that his health did not permit his braving the hardships of the frontier. It was given him in the cognate language formulated by the medical faculty from the Latin. He took it and went to his post, bidding farewell, for only a few days, to his regretful friends. When he reached Fort Worth, to which he was ordered, and presented his certificate, the surgeon laughed immoderately, and told him it was a certificate that he had suffered from an accumulation of dandruff in his hair; that he was quite bald and his head glistened only added to his indignation. This came very near causing a duel with his jocular medical friend. Many officers having become established in the city, and being hampered in many ways, resigned, and there was wide-spread dissatisfaction among the eas
and carrying rocks, for three days, and there were a good many got their places finished, when on the morning of the fourth day an order arrived to bring us back to San Antonio to get paroled sure, and leave the state. We all gave three cheers for the Union, and every one knocked off work and got ready for a move. We heard the order read by old Taylor; he had changed completely from savage to mild, but we knew the old rascal too well to trust him. We started back the next day and got to Camp Worth, near San Antonio, where the order read we were to be paroled and furnished with an escort to the Federal lines. We were all paroled on the twenty-sixth of December, 1862, to be exchanged as soon as possible. The guard was then taken off, and on the first day of January we started on our march for home, with an escort of eighty cavalry, composed mostly of Germans. They were not very strong for secession, but they had, like a good many others, to become soldiers or hang on the branch o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
nton, Mass.31,03625,4485,588 Canton, O 30,66726,1894.478 Butte, Mont30,47010,72319,747 Montgomery, Ala30,34621,8838,463 Auburn, N. Y.30,34525,8584,487 East St. Louis, Ill.29,65515,16914,486 Joliet, Ill.29,35323,2646,089 Sacramento, Cal29,28226,3862,896 Racine, Wis 29,10221,0148,088 La Crosse. Wis 28.89525,0903,805 Williamsport, Pa 28,75727,1321,625 Jacksonville. Pa 28,42917,20111,228 Newcastle, Pa28,33911,60016,739 Newport, Ky 28.30124,9183,383 Oshkosh. Wis28,28422.8365,448 Noonsocket. R. I.28,20420,8307,374 Pueblo. Col 28,15724,5583,599 Atlantic City, N. J.27,83813.05514,783 Passaic, N. J.27,77713,02814,749 Bay City, Mich.27,62827.839*211 Fort Worth. Tex26.68823,0763,612 Lexington, Ky26,36921,5674,802 Gloucester. Mass.26,12124,6511,470 South Omaha, Neb26.0018,06217,939 New Britain. Conn 25,99816,5199.479 Council Bluffs, Ia.25,80221.4744,328 Cedar Rapids, Ia 25,65618,0207,636 Easton, Pa25,23814,48110,757 Jackson. Mich.25,18020,7984,382 *Decrease.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
1st Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to June, 1865. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to August, 1865. Service. Garrison duty at Forts Worth, Williams and Ellsworth, defenses of Washington, D. C. South of the Potomac till May, 1864. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field May 17. Moved to Spottsylvania Q. H. May 17-19. Spottsylvania C. H. May 19-21. North Anna of Washington, and 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to November, 1863. Service. Guard and patrol duty at Alexandria, Va., till January 12, 1863. Garrison duty at Fort Worth till May, and at redoubts near Fort Lyon till November. (Cos. B, F and G at Fort Ellsworth.) Designation of Regiment changed to 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery November 23, 1863. (See 2nd Heavy Artillery.) 20th Connecticut Regiment Inf
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 33: Texas and Texans. (search)
nd greasy stuff is poured into your cup: This is the only milk we have. It is New England milk, prepared in cans, and warranted to keep in any climate. If you ask for butter, you get a mixture of grease and brine. Living in a wild country, with Comanches on the north and Kickapoos on the south, the Texans have not yet acquired that solid hold of the soil which lends a platform to domestic arts. A chain of military posts runs through the land, from Fort Richardson, Fort Griffin, and Fort Worth, in the upper counties, to Fort Concho, Fort Ewell, and Fort Clarke, in the lower counties. Every season, some portions of the State are overrun by savages from Mexico; not such gentle savages as those who stream into Shefelah and Sharon, eating the grapes, drinking the water, and fighting the peasantry, but monsters in human shape, who steal into the settled parts in search of cows and ponies, scalps and girls. There are no milking-maids and dairy-maids in Texas. If the farmers had suc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
d, from a small town to a city of over twenty thousand inhabitants. At night the two military companies escorted General Lee to the hall, where a large and enthusiastic audience greeted him, and applauded to the echo his eloquent story of Chancellorsville. [Our printers are at this point clamoring for copy, and hinting very strongly that they are already nearly full, so we shall be compelled to condense more than we had intended the balance of our sketch.] We had purposed going to Fort Worth, and Denison, and were anxious to visit a number of other points in Texas, to which General Lee received cordial invitations, but the overflow of the Mississippi and the suspension of travel by railroad from Little Rock to Memphis compelled us to hurry on to Little Rock, where we arrived at 3:30 A. M. Saturday, thereby flanking a grand military and civic reception for General Lee, which had been planned by the joint committee of the Legislature of Arkansas and the citizens of Little
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
d, from a small town to a city of over twenty thousand inhabitants. At night the two military companies escorted General Lee to the hall, where a large and enthusiastic audience greeted him, and applauded to the echo his eloquent story of Chancellorsville. [Our printers are at this point clamoring for copy, and hinting very strongly that they are already nearly full, so we shall be compelled to condense more than we had intended the balance of our sketch.] We had purposed going to Fort Worth, and Denison, and were anxious to visit a number of other points in Texas, to which General Lee received cordial invitations, but the overflow of the Mississippi and the suspension of travel by railroad from Little Rock to Memphis compelled us to hurry on to Little Rock, where we arrived at 3:30 A. M. Saturday, thereby flanking a grand military and civic reception for General Lee, which had been planned by the joint committee of the Legislature of Arkansas and the citizens of Little
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A list of Confederate officers, prisoners, who were held by Federal authority on Morris Island, S. C., under Confederate fire from September 7th to October 21st, 1864. (search)
apt. Thos. M. Cobble, 48th inft., Abingdon. Capt. W. T. McConnell, 48th inft., Estillsville. Zzz=Capt. W. S. Guthrie, 23d inft., Prince Edward C. H. Zzz=Capt. Jas. Dunlap, 26th battalion, Union, Monroe Co., W. Va. Zzz=Capt. A. M. Edgar, 27th battalion, Lewisburg, W. Va. Zzz=Capt. I. A. Lipps, 50th Va. inft., Wise C. H. Zzz=Capt. J. O. B. Crocker, 9th Va. inft., Norfolk. Zzz=Capt. B. Horton, 11th Va. inft., Campbell county. Zzz=Capt. R. C. Gillespie, 45th Va. inft., Fort Worth, Texas. Zzz=Capt. R. H. Miller, 44th Va. inft., Buckingham county. Zzz=Capt. J. M. Hillsman, 44th Va. inft., Amelia C. H. Zzz=Capt. T. H. Board, 58th Va. inft., Bedford county. Zzz=Capt. J. M. Hughes, 44 Va. inft. Zzz=Capt. Isaac R. Kendall, 7th cav., Romney, W. Va. Zzz=Capt. J. M. Lovell, 22d cav., Hampshire, W. Va. Zzz=Capt. W. Mitchell, 6th cav., Pittsylvania. Zzz=Capt. T. A. Moon, 6th cav., Halifax. Zzz=Capt. A. M. King, 50th inft. Zzz=Capt. B. J. Brown, 7th in
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