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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ern leaders insured him unusual facilities for his operations. He mingled freely with them at Frankfort and other points, apparently having no ulterior object, yet was busy arranging for the secret orehead, James F. Robinson, John B. Huston and Robert Richardson. The convention assembled at Frankfort May 27th, and continued in session until June 3d. Besides the delegates from Kentucky there ted, also to call a convention looking to the preservation of peace in Kentucky, to be held at Frankfort on the 9th of September. In accordance with the recommendation of the conference, within a fe to be found in Rebellion Records, Vol. IV, pages 378, 396. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Frankfort, Aug.—1861. [date not given but about August 20th.] Hon. Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: Siis was near at hand. The Peace convention called by the Southern Rights leaders was held at Frankfort on the 9th and 10th of September, 1861, but resulted only in the adoption of resolutions deplo
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ening and moved to Lawrenceburg twenty miles distant, threatening Frankfort in order to draw off the troops from Georgetown. Remained there until the return of my courier from Frankfort, who brought the information that there was a force in Frankfort of 2,000 or 3,000 men, consistFrankfort of 2,000 or 3,000 men, consisting of Home Guards collected from the adjacent counties and a few regular troops. From Lawrenceburg I proceeded to Shryock's Ferry on the Keand was informed just before reaching the place that a train from Frankfort was due with two regiments of Federals. I tore up the track and e road, but the train was warned of our presence and returned to Frankfort. Having taken possession of the telegraph office I intercepted a to destroy the track between Midway and Lexington and Midway and Frankfort and to blow up the stone bridge on that road, which he successfulll be under the domination of Morgan in a few days. He will take Frankfort and Lexington if forces are not sent immediately. Then, the spec
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ful execution Cumberland Gap turned, and Eastern Kentucky occupied Scott's cavalry battle of Richmond great Confederate victory occupation of Lexington and Frankfort and the country East of Louisville to the Ohio river enthusiastic Reception by the people ample supplies Confederate recruits. The publication by the Feders of artillery, 8,000 or 10,000 stand of arms and large quantities of supplies. Colonel Scott pursued the retreating forces, reaching Lexington on September 2d, Frankfort on the 3d and Shelbyville on the 4th. It was one of the most decisive victories of the war, and at one stroke practically caused the evacuation of all Kentucky east of Louisville and south of Cincin- nati. On the 2d, General Smith occupied Lexington with a portion of his infantry, sending a small force to Frankfort and General Heth with his division toward Covington. Vast quantities of stores of all kinds, arms, ammunition, wagons, horses and mules came into his possession, and he was r
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
tion messages to Smith visit to Danville, Lexington and Frankfort inauguration of Governor Hawes Buell's arrival in Louisville and unexpected movement Sill's feint on Frankfort Bragg's sudden evacuation of Frankfort his fatal MisinterpretatiFrankfort his fatal Misinterpretation of Buell's movement concentration of army Defective movements preceding battle of Perryville. Thus far General Bragg'a Springfield and Perryville to Lexington, and thence to Frankfort, where, on October 4th, Hon. Richard Hawes, who had been dvancing on the 3rd as far as Clay Village, 16 miles from Frankfort, as a feint on the latter place. General Polk—who had ragg mistook the movement of Sill's division to mean that Frankfort was the objective point of Buell's army, and this was theal Polk to move all his available force via Bloomfield to Frankfort, to strike the enemy, which would have been but one divis 4th, upon the approach of Sill's cavalry, retreated from Frankfort to Versailles. The effect of the sound of the Federal ar
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
Marshall; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. Moore; Eleventh district, Ben. F. Bradley; Twelfth district, John M. Elliott. Mr. Bradley afterwards served as State senator. The legislative council, upon the admission of the State, elected Henry C. Burnett and William E. Simms senators to the Confederate Congress, and they served through the war. Upon the death of Gov. George W. Johnson, who fell on the second day at Shiloh, while fighting in the ranks, the legislative council elected Hon. Richard Hawes his successor. While the State was occupied by the Confederate army under General Bragg, Governor Hawes was inaugurated with due formality, and he delivered an inaugural address in the capitol at Frankfort, October 4, 1862, but the evacuation of the place the same afternoon prevented his performance of any of the functions of governor except the occupation of the executive mansion for a few hours. After the war he was county judge of Bourbon county for many years.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
e was put in temporary command of the department of Western Virginia and East Tennessee, May 31, 1864. After the war he returned to Kentucky and lived mostly at Frankfort. He was State librarian from 1867 to 1871. He died at Danville, Ky., November 27, 1880. General Crittenden had a brother, Thomas L., who sided with the Union, st distinguished families of Kentucky. His father was an eminent lawyer and jurist, and his grandfather was Humphrey Marshall, the statesman. He was born in Frankfort, Ky., January 13, 1812, and was graduated at West Point in 1832 with promotion to brevet thirdlieuten-ant in the mounted rangers. He served in the Black Hawk expedition, and was made brevet second-lieutenant of the First dragoons March 4, 1833, but resigned in April. He then practiced law at Frankfort and at Louisville and was successively captain, major and lieutenant-colonel of Kentucky militia. In the Mexican war he served as colonel of the First Kentucky cavalry volunteers, and under