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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 149 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Pala (New Mexico, United States) or search for Pala (New Mexico, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
ne, starting from the rich mining districts of Chihuahua, pursued its course by way of El Paso, Santa Fe, and the Rocky Mountains to Fort Leavenworth, on the borders of the Missouri; the other, leavinhey have to cross a desert of four hundred leagues in order to reach the capital of New Mexico, Santa Fe which is situated between two branches of the Cordilleras, upon an elevated plateau on which raal the title of governor of the new State, the two regiments of cavalry that Kearny had left at Santa Fe did not remain inactive. One, commanded by Colonel Sterling Price, whom we shall find later inas moreover obliged to accept the company of a caravan of American traders, who, after reaching Santa Fe by crossing the desert, were only waiting for an opportunity to introduce American goods into Ms service. Like those torrents which rush down from the Rocky Mountains in the neighborhood of Santa Fe, some running into the Pacific Ocean and others into the Gulf of Mexico, so did the small band
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
deral army stationed in the South-west of the Union into the hands of his accomplices, General Floyd had not confined his operations to Texas, where we have seen the treason of Twiggs and Van Dorn fully successful. He had sent Colonel Loring to Santa Fe to take command of the regular forces, numbering twelve hundred men, stationed in New Mexico, with Colonel Crittenden as second in command; these two officers were entirely devoted to the cause of the South, and we shall soon find them again witad found, an armed force ready to assist them. Lieutenant-Colonel Roberts, having fathomed their schemes, encouraged and directed this opposition; and when Loring sought to lead the forces under his command into Texas, the officers stationed at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and at Forts Craig and Stanton refused to obey him. Notwithstanding their isolated position, they thus succeeded in securing New Mexico to the Federal government. Loring and Crittenden, still trying to conceal their intentions, th
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
ey to be found in those regions, where it seldom rains. After passing not far from the city of Santa Fe, it leaves New Mexico at the gorges of El Paso, and from this point to its mouth, at Matamoras,defended by a few guns of heavy calibre, was the key of the valley of the Rio Grande and of the Santa Fe road. But Canby's troops, although numerically superior, were far inferior in quality, to the ck at Socorro, reached Albuquerque, where he found abundant provisions, and proceeded thence to Santa Fe, bearing to the right by the Apache Pass defile, near which stands Fort Union, situated at a digion which had been conquered in such a brilliant manner for any length of time. The people of Santa Fe did not conceal their hostility. They found but few resources in that city, whose entire internted him, was preparing to harass their rear. In less than a fortnight after his entrance into Santa Fe, Sibley found himself under the necessity of evacuating that city to concentrate his forces at