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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
rrison attended Henry Benson to the cars for Providence, placing in his hands a letter addressed to mediately sat down, and wrote to a friend in Providence a description of the incidents of the day ason, where he joined his wife on the train to Providence. The cars and stages leaving Boston that mo supposed it was a busy foreignpost day. At Providence the truth reached her: President Wayland William Goodell writes to Mr. Garrison from Providence, Feb. 25, 1836: Have you read Wayland's Elem George W. Benson to Henry E. Benson. Providence, October 26, 1835. Ms. I think Brother Gomfortable ride that we had from Brooklyn to Providence. He seemed to be as little fatigued as myse November 18, Mr. Garrison took the cars for Providence to rejoin his wife at Brooklyn. On the day ca! W. L. Garrison to Mary Benson, at Providence. Brooklyn, November 27, 1835. Ms. Much d to remain and be offered up. The finger of Providence seemed to point to Great Britain as a scene [5 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
ement. George Benson writes to his son Henry, at Providence, February 13, 1836: Your brother Ms. Garrison hading: W. L. Garrison to William Goodell, at Providence. Brooklyn, February 26, 1836. Ms. My Dearly with S. J. May, proceeded on that day as far as Providence. W. L. Garrison to his Wife, at Brooklyn. bro. May but our esteemed friend Wm. Goodell from Providence? It seems that he had heard of the contemplated ! W. L. Garrison to Geo. W. Benson, at Providence. Brooklyn, March 15, 1836. Ms. Bro. Goodell xpediency of having the Convention held either in Providence or Lowell. Mr. Kimball proposed that we should hticle, he had written as follows to his wife from Providence, while en route to Fall River: To deliver a 4tand our dear babe would accompany me farther than Providence; but our warm-hearted friend Lewis Tappan laid cle car and in the steamboat. Soon after we left Providence, his mother began to feel sick and dizzy, on acco
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
hristians, applaud and do homage to human government? or shall we not rather lay the axe at the root of the tree, and attempt to destroy both cause and effect together? Foolish are the speculations about the best form of human government: What is government but the express image of the moral character of a people? The hand of Noyes was first made visible in the Liberator of July 28, when the editor reported his own Lib. 7.123. Fourth of July address before the Anti-Slavery Society of Providence (in the High-Street meeting-house). It was, he said, somewhat peculiar, and couched in solemn language. In the course of it he had read an extract of a letter from an esteemed friend, in which the following startling passage occurred: My hope of the millen- nium begins where Dr. Beecher's expires, viz., at the overthrow of this nation! This passage, which had deeply affected his mind, he developed in contrast to the noisy celebration of the national holiday, with its impious assumption
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
r himself and family to other, though as yet unknown, sources. The same good Providence which has thus far sustained him will still supply his necessities, if he faimuch better condition, as to my health and spirits, than when I left. A kind Providence had taken care of my cherished wife and children. George has certainly grownve Brooklyn on Saturday next with my family, Sept. 15, 1838. for Boston, via Providence. If there was preparation on one side, there was counterpreparation on th left an account in a letter dated Boston, September 21, 1838, to his wife in Providence, from whom he had parted on Monday the 17th: Next morning, attended thessachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. W. L. Garrison to Mary Benson, at Providence. Boston, December 23, 1838. Ms. The annual meeting of our State Anti-Slaeniously than was the Clerical Appeal affair. Torrey, of Salem, (formerly of Providence), is Rev. Charles T. Torrey. one of the most active of the plotters. I unde
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ll be keen and powerful, I doubt not. Oliver Johnson is expected home from Vermont on Tuesday. Mar. 5.1839. If I can arrange matters with him, I shall go to Providence soon, and also to other places, for the purpose of lecturing, etc. . . . The division of the anti-slavery household was real, but it was not yet complete. who are willing to unite with me, and co-operate on some broad principle, that will not require any one to violate his individual convictions of right. From Providence, on May 5, Mr. Garrison, in the best of spirits from his successful campaign, wrote to his wife: Birney is out, in the last Emancipator, with a May 2, 1839. l decided step towards Presidential candidates. Our labor will be more than half lost without them. It is a step which we have always contemplated as one which Providence might force upon us. Has not the time come? What else can we do except to back outThe South can outbid us, and hence she will buy up both political parties, as
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
ecticut. See Thomas Davis and Wm. Chace; Chace and Davis were brothers-in-law, and both of Providence; the latter a native of Ireland, a manufacturing jeweller, and afterwards (1853-55) a Represens wishes me to say to you that he calculates on Ms. chartering the steamboat Massachusetts at Providence, for the purpose of carrying on our friends to the Annual Meeting of the A. A. S. Society. Hee at such a gathering of fanaticism, and such a dying away of abolitionism. On arriving at Providence, the company embarked on board of the steamboat Rhode Island, which had the American flag flyit been fashioned), a considerable number of delegates from Bristol County and from the city of Providence joining us; so that, huge and capacious as were the dimensions of our chartered boat, it was vtheasterly storm which had lasted for several days previous, cleared up finely just as we left Providence, and a glorious sunset and a bright moonlight evening followed. All was tranquil, all happy.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
o win her from Brooklyn; and this makes it more kind in her to be willing to take up her abode with us. The meeting of the Rhode Island State Society will take place (I believe) on the 23d and 24th inst. If convenient, I wish mother would be in Providence at that time, so as to return with me. Let me beseech you not to fail to be at that meeting. Something must be done to prevent the last state of Rhode Island being worse than the first. Remember your former connection with the State Society, we ought to be up and doing. I lecture as often as I can conveniently, but it is very difficult Lib. 10.187, 191, 207. for me to be absent from Boston. . . . I attended the State meeting of the Rhode Island A. S. Lib. 10.191. Society at Providence, a few days since. It was pretty well attended, and passed some strong resolutions. Abby Kelley was present and spoke. Colver's malice did not cease with the Convention, in which he and Mr. Garrison participated on exactly equal terms, as
Garrison, H. E. Benson, Henry Egbert [b. Providence, R. I., July 31, 1814; d. there Jan. 6, 1837], erbury town meeting, 320, and G.'s speech in Providence, 338; boards with G., 2.41; on Boston mob feng, 1.491; companion of Thompson, 2.2, 3; to Providence, 8, 44, to Boston, 45; with G. after mob, 47ion visit to Boston, 1.448-450; treatment in Providence, 450; debate with G. Thompson and charge aga Penn. Hall, 218. Brewer, —, Mr. (of Providence, R. I.), 1.314. Brewster, Benjamin H., 1.342oklyn, 359. Garrison, Helen Eliza [b. Providence, R. I., Feb. 23, 1811; d. Roxbury, Mass., Jan. anual Labor School described, 337; speaks in Providence and Brooklyn, 338, 339, 340, 422, Hartford, 2.93; on Wayland's Elements, 37; meets G. in Providence, 46; articles on Human Rights, 90, 94, accuschapel, 356. Pringle, Thomas, 1.226. Providence (R. I.), colored petition for suffrage, 1.256.—S1.99, 100. Yerrinton, James Brown [b. Providence, R. I., Dec. 4, 1800; d. Chelsea, Mass., Oct. 1[6 more...]<