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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 10 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
men can look with any hope or pleasure. Momentous are the consequences which depend upon your action. Garnett mourned over the action of Virginia, in hesitating to go with the revolution. I do not believe, he said, that the course of the Legislature is a fair expression of the popular feeling. In the east, at least, the great majority believe in the right of secession, and feel the deepest sympathy with Carolina in opposition to measures which they regard as she does. But the west-Western Virginia--here is the rub! Only sixty thousand slaves to four hundred and ninety-four thousand whites! When I consider this fact, and the kind of argument which we have heard in this body, I cannot but regard with the greatest fear the question, whether Virginia would assist Carolina in such an issue. I must acknowledge, my dear Sir, that I look to the future with almost as much apprehension as hope. You will object to the term Democrat. Democracy, in its original philosophical sense, is ind
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
xert against entering into one with South Carolina, that has been a common brawler and disturber of the peace for the last thirty years, and who would give no security that I would be willing to accept, that she would not be as faithless to the next compact as she has been to this which she is now endeavoring to avoid. Letter of John Minor Botts to H. B. M., Esq., of Staunton, dated November 27, 1860. We may also add the important fact that the great mass of the people, especially of Western Virginia, were too thoroughly loyal to follow the leadings of the politicians into revolutionary ways. Almost a year rolled away, and the same man (Memminger) stood up before a large congregation of citizens in Charleston, November 30, 1860. and, in a speech which perfectly exhibited the power of the politicians over the people of South Carolina, foreshadowed, in distinct outline, the course of revolutionary events in the near future. He foretold the exact day when an ordinance of secession
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
decided by the popular vote. The secessionists denounced this decree as an emasculation of the Convention Bill, and subjecting to imminent peril all that the people of Virginia hold most sacred and dear, both as to the Federal Constitution and the honor of the State Richmond Enquirer.--in other words, imperiling the scheme of the conspirators to drag the people of Virginia into revolution. The decree delighted the loyal people of the State, and numerous Union meetings were held in Western Virginia. While the Legislature seemed to be thoroughly inoculated with the revolutionary virus, it felt the restraints of the popular sentiment too forcibly to allow it to disregard the popular will, and several measures looking to a settlement of existing difficulties were proposed in that body. Finally, on the 19th of January, a series of resolutions were adopted, recommending a National Convention to be held in the City of Washington on the 4th day of February, for the alleged purpose of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 9: proceedings in Congress.--departure of conspirators. (search)
eat Civil War, as exponents of the conflicting views entertained concerning the Government, its character, and its power. Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson, Benjamin F. Wade, and others in the Senate; and John Sherman, Charles Francis Adams, Thomas Corwin, and others in the House of Representatives, made powerful speeches against Mr. Crittenden's propositions, and in favor of universal freedom. One of the most remarkable passages in the great debate was the speech of Sherrard Clemens, of Western Virginia, who took such decided ground against the pretensions of the Oligarchy, that its representatives in Congress called him a traitor. With the most biting scorn, he thus referred to the conspirators in Congress:--Patriotism has become a starveling birdling, clinging with unfledged wings around the nest of twigs where it was born. A statesman now must not only Narrow his mind, And to party give up what was meant for mankind, but he must become as submissive as a blind horse in a bark-
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
nt to communicate to that body the policy which he intended to pursue in regard to the Confederate States. The Commissioners appointed were William Ballard Preston, A. H. H. Stuart, and George W. Randolph. It is said that Mr. Carlile, of Western Virginia, suggested the appointment of a similar committee to visit Montgomery, to ascertain what Jefferson Davis intended to do with the troops he was then raising; whereupon Henry A. Wise said, that if Mr. Carlile should be one of that committee, t and persuasions, appeals to interest, State pride and sectional patriotism, and the shafts of ridicule and scornful denunciation were brought to bear upon the faithful Union men, who were chiefly from the mountain districts of the State, or Western Virginia; and yet, at the adjournment, on the evening of the 15th, there was a clear majority of the one hundred and fifty-three members of the Convention against secession. The conspirators became desperate. Richmond was in the hands of a mob read
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
nd forty-seven thousand two hundred and thirty-eight against it, or a majority in favor of disunion of fifty-seven thousand six hundred and seventy-eight. The items of the vote, as given in the proclamation, were as follows:--  separation.no separation. East Tennessee14,78032,923 Middle Tennessee58,2628,198 West Tennessee29,1576,117 Military Camps2,714(none)   Total104,91347,238 Even this false report showed that East Tennessee--the mountain region of the State, which, like Western Virginia, was not seriously poisoned by the virus of the Slave system — was loyal to the Republic by a heavy majority. It is said that one-half of the votes cast in favor of Separation in East Tennessee were illegal, having been given by soldiers of the insurgent army, who had no right to vote anywhere. See Sketches of the Rise. Progress, and Decline of Secession, et coetera: by W. G. Brownlow, now (1865) Governor of Tennessee, page 222. All through the war that ensued East Tennessee remain
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
1861. Wallace reported to the Governor the sixty companies for the six regiments, complete, and in Camp Morton, adjoining Indianapolis. He reported, in addition, more than eighty surplus companies, organized and ready to move. With the report he sent in his resignation, and a request for permission to go out and organize his own regiment. It was given, and within the next twenty-four hours he reported the Eleventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers (Zouaves), which did admirable service in Western Virginia a few weeks later, as organized, armed, and ready for marching orders. Wallace's regiment was a fair type of the Indiana Volunteers who composed her quota. It was an assemblage of mechanics, farmers, lawyers, doctors, and clergymen. They were all young and full of life, and ambitious, quick, shrewd, and enterprising. The regiment adopted the Zouave costume of Colonel Wallace's Crawfordsville Company. The color was steel gray, with a narrow binding of red on their jackets and the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 20: commencement of civil War. (search)
nto Fairfax Court House the Unionists in Western Virginia, 488. Union Convention at Wheeling alarernment of Virginia reorganized, 491. State of West Virginia, 492. troops ordered to Western VirgiWestern Virginia, 493. insurgents in Western Virginia, 494. March against the insurgents at Philippi, 495. batse aggressive movements, and by others in Western Virginia, took active measures to oppose them. Thof the labor and thrift of the citizens of West Virginia. These considerations, and their innate lxpected a revolt and an appeal to arms in Western Virginia, under the auspices of the National Goverthe State in its favor, while the vote in Western Virginia was overwhelmingly against it. A Conventi diameter. On one side are the words, State of West Virginia, and Montana Semper Liberi --that is tmoving toward the border, the patriots of Western Virginia, and especially of the River counties, rut when they had assisted the loyal men of Western Virginia until they could protect themselves, then[9 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 21: beginning of the War in Southeastern Virginia. (search)
regiment. and anticipations concerning its services had been raised which were never disappointed. A large majority of the members of this regiment became officers in the war that ensued; and every member of the Montgomery Guards-Wallace's original Zouave Company, who accompanied him on this tour of duty-received a commission. These commissions ranged from that of second lieutenant to major-general. It expected to accompany the Indiana and Ohio troops whom General McClellan sent to Western Virginia, but was ordered instead to Evansville, on the Ohio, in Southern Indiana, to act as a police force in preventing supplies and munitions of war being sent to the South, and to protect that region from threatened invasion. The regiment chafed in its comparatively inactive service, with an earnest desire for duty in the field, and it was delighted by an order issued on the 6th of June, by the General-in-chief, to proceed by rail to Cumberland, Maryland, and report to Major-General Patters
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. (search)
Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. Insurgents at Harper's Ferry, 519. UnExploits of Indiana troops, 530. McClellan in Western Virginia expedition against the insurgents, 531. battMcClellan's dispatches, 535. Union triumph in Western Virginia, 536. events in the Kanawha Valley, 537. The fires of civil war were blazing out; and in Western Virginia the opposing forces were carrying on quite an ade by the insurgents to occupy the country in Western Virginia south of it. We have observed that Colonel Porhe issued a proclamation to the inhabitants of Western Virginia, similar in tenor to the one sent forth from Cmly believe that secession is Seat of War in Western Virginia. killed in this section of the country. He wt: We have completely annihilated the enemy in Western Virginia. Our loss is about thirteen killed, and not mho had a brigadier's commission. The war in Western Virginia seemed to have ended with the dispersion of Ga