hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
artillery into one corps, and placed it under the command of General Pendleton, as chief. He also gave a similar organization to his cavalry. When April came, Lee found himself at the head of an army unsurpassed in discipline, and full of enthusiasm; yet it was divided, for, so early as February, he had sent Longstreet with two divisions to operate against General J. J. Peck in the vicinity of Suffolk, on the south side of the James River, and other troops were raiding with Imboden in West Virginia. Yet he felt strong, with only about half the number, of troops in hand commanded by his antagonist, for he had extended and strengthened his fortifications in rear of Fredericksburg, and constructed a system of elaborate works along his whole front reaching from Banks's Ford to Port Royal, more than twenty-five miles. Chancellorsville, by Hotchkiss and Allan, page 15. Even with his superior force Hooker's army was composed of seven corps, and comprised twenty-three divisions. The
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
Headquarters at Pittsburg. The Middle Department was under the command of General Schenck, Headquarters at Baltimore. On the 12th, Governor Curtin, of that State, issued a call for the entire militia of the commonwealth to turn out to defend its soil, but it was feebly responded to; and on the 15th, the President called upon the States nearest the capital for an aggregate of one hundred thousand militia. Maryland was called upon for 10,000 men; Pennsylvania, 50,000; Ohio, 30,000; and West Virginia, 10,000. This, too, was tardily and stingily answered, while uniformed and disciplined regiments of the city of New York so promptly marched toward the field of danger that the Secretary of War publicly thanked the Governor of that State for the exhibition of patriotism. Despondency had produced apathy, and it appeared, for the moment, as if the patriotism of the loyalists was waning, and that the expectation of the Confederates, of a general cry for peace in the Free-labor States, was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
ready for battle, 110. Meade withdraws from Mine Run, 111. operations in West Virginia, 112. Averill's raid in Virginia, 113. difficulties and perils encounteredetermined to strike the Ohio at some point where he might cross over into Western Virginia, or Northeastern Kentucky, and make his way back to Tennessee with his plumac in 1863, and at about the same time co-operating military operations in West Virginia were closed, by the expulsion from that region of nearly all armed and orgake's loss was sixty-three men. After this there was comparative quiet in West Virginia, until the summer of 1863, when a raiding party, one thousand strong, undered and fifty-six men. Much later in the year, Averill, still watching in West Virginia, made another aggressive movement. He left Beverly, in Tygart's Valley, ea. Averill reported his own loss at about one hundred, officers and men. West Virginia was now nearly purged of armed rebels, and not long afterward, Averill star
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
's communications between Nashville and Bridgeport. These troops were moved with marvelous celerity under the wise direction of General Meigs, the Quartermaster-General, and the skillful management of Colonel D. E. McCallum, the Government Superintendent of railways, and W. Prescott Smith, Master of Transportation on the Baltimore and Ohio road. In the space of eight days, the two corps, twenty thousand strong, marched from the Rapid Anna to Washington, and were thence conveyed through West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee, to the Tennessee River. Halleck determined to hold Chattanooga and East Tennessee at all hazards. For that purpose he ordered the concentration of three armies there, under one commander, and on the 16th of October, 1863. an order went out from the War Department, saying: By order of the President of the United States, the Departments of the Ohio [Burnside's], of the Cumberland [Rosecrans's], and of the Tennessee [Grant's], will constitute the Militar
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
min F. Wade, John Sherman. Oregon.--Benjamin F. Harding, G. W. Nesmith. Pennsylvania.--Charles R. Buckalew, Edward Cowan. Rhode Island.--William Sprague, Henry B. Anthony. Vermont.--Solomon Foot, Jacob Collamer. Virginia.--John S. Carlile. West Virginia.--Waitman T. Willey, P. G. Van Winkle. Wisconsin.--James R. Doolittle, Timothy O. Howe. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President of the Republic and President of the Senate. House of Representatives. California.--Thomas B. Shannon, William Higbe, John L. Dawson, J. K. Moorhead, Thomas Williams, Jesse Lazear. Rhode Island.--Thomas A. Jenckes, Nathan F. Dixon. Vermont.--Frederick E. Woodbridge, Justin S. Morrill, Portus Baxter. Virginia.--Joseph Segar, L. H. Chandler, B. M. Kitchen. West Virginia.--Jacob B. Blair, William G. Brown, Killian V. Whaley. Wisconsin.--James S. Brown, Ithamar C. Sloan, Amasa Cobb, Charles A. Eldridge, Ezra Wheeler, Walter D. McIndoe. Schuyler Colfax, Speaker of the House of Representatives. delegates fr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
nion officers, whose courtesy we can never forget. On the morning of the 23d May, 1866. we rode to the railway station, behind the large, stout, black family horse of Governor Brownlow, which bore General McClellan through his campaigns in Western Virginia; and in company with Colonel Brownlow and Captain A. W. Walker, one of the most noted of the Union scouts in East Tennessee, we journeyed by railway to Greenville, near which occurred many events. illustrative of the patriotism of the East from the North, as circumstances might require. Another force was organized for the purpose of menacing the westward communications with Richmond. This force was to be composed of the army of General Franz Sigel, then engaged in protecting Western Virginia and the frontiers of Maryland and Pennsylvania. He was to form his army into two columns, one of them, about ten thousand strong, under General Crook, to march up from the Kanawha region and operate against the Virginia and East Tennessee r
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
n that battle, 309. effects of these battles in Virginia, 310. Grant again attempts to flank Lee's Army, 311. Sheridan's raid in Lee's rear, 312. events in West Virginia, 313. Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley, 314. Hunter's expedition to Lynchburg, 315. the ravages of War, 316. On the evening of the 3d of May, 1864, the Armmac further in its advance toward Richmond, let us see what had been doing for awhile on its right by forces which, as we have observed, had been arranged in Western Virginia for co-operating movements. For some time that region had been the theater of some stirring minor events of the war. Confederate cavalry, guerrilla bands, a days afterward, Champe Ferguson, one of the most notorious of the lower order of guerrilla leaders, was surprised while at the Rock House, in Wayne County, of West Virginia, by Colonel Gallup, who was in command on the eastern border of Kentucky. Ferguson and fifty of his men were made prisoners, and fifteen others were killed.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
otomac into Maryland, taking it in reverse. Lee eagerly watched an opportunity for the movement. It was offered when Hunter fled from before Lynchburg into Western Virginia, with an exhausted and broken army, See page 316. and left the Shenandoah Valley, and its door opening into Maryland at Harper's Ferry, guarded only by a rned back. They had reached Harper's Ferry on the day when Chambersburg was burnt, and were there joined by some of Hunter's long-expected troops, coming from West Virginia; and then the entire force, with an immense train, went on a fruitless search for Early, who was supposed to be laying waste Western Pennsylvania. But the Confront Early with about twenty thousand. Sheridan's column for active operations consisted of the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, and the infantry and cavalry of West Virginia, under Generals Crook and Averill. To these were added the cavalry divisions of Torbert and Wilson, sent to him from the army before Petersburg. His cavalry
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ny, Sprague; Connecticut--Dixon, Foster; Vermont--Collamer, Foot: New York, Harris, Morgan; New Jersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlan; Wiscicks; California--McDougall.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buckalew of Pennsylvania; Wright of New Jersey; Hicks of Maryland; Bowden and Carlisle, of West Virginia; Richardson of Illinois. This measure was first submitted to the Senate by Mr. Henderson, of Missouri, on the 11th of January, 1864, and, as we have observeMcAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, O'Neill, Scofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams; Delaware--Smithers; Maryland--Cresswell, Davis, Thomas, Webster; West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley; Kentucky--Anderson, Kendall, Smith, Yeaman; Ohio--Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding; Indiana--Colfax, Derwent. Jul
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
rtance, before a General movement of the armies operating against Richmond, that all communications with that City, north of the James River, should be cut off. At the Middle of February circumstances favored an effort to that end. Lee had drawn the greater portion of the forces from the Shenandoah Valley the few Confederates in Northern Virginia, under Rosser, Moseby, and others, had been quite active during the winter. The former, with a mounted force, went over the mountains into Western Virginia, and at Beverly surprised a guard of horses and stores, 700 strong, and captured 400 of the men and all the property, on the 11th of January. On the 21st of February a squad of Confederate cavalry, under Lieutenant McNeil, dashed into Cumberland. Between midnight and dawn, and with the assistance of disloyal residents, seized Generals Kelley and Crook, in their beds, placed them on horses, and carried them off to Richmond. for service at Richmond, or with Johnston, below the Roanoke.
1 2