Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Richmond (Virginia, United States) or search for Richmond (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back sRichmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back some of the closing scenes of the Southern Confederacy, in which the writer participated, and which were several years since written out, and are here retold at the request of the Banner. The scene I will describe pertains to the evacuation of Richmond and the fifteen days immediately following. The writer was at the time trainmaster of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, and stationed at Danville, Va., the road then running only from Richmond to Danville, there connecting with the Piedmon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
Sussex Light Dragoons. [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, Sept. 18, 1897.] A roll of this gallant organization. Something of its history. The following is the original roll of the Sussex Light Dragoons: Captain, Benjamin W. Belshes; First Lieutenant, George H. Dillard; Second Lieutenant, William W. Blow; Junior Second Lieutenant, P. S. Parker; First Sergeant, H. Q. Moyler; Second Sergeant, Thomas A. Dillard; Third Sergeant, E. T. Thornton; Fourth Sergeant, William L. Adkins; Corporals, T. L. Johnson, F. L. Vellines, James E. Barker, Joseph H. Chappel; Privates, A. P. Adkins, J. D. Adkins, B. R. Birdsong, A. S. Birdsong, Henry Birdsong, Jr., J. 18 A. Bishop, J. L. Chappell, E. T. Chappell, R. A. Cocke, T. E. Dillard, R. L. Dobie, J. J. Dillard, W. H. Dillard, E. M. Ellis, A. H. Ellis, W. H. Gwaltney, B. F. Harrison, R. K. Harrison, T. J. Harrison, James H. Harrison, J. W. Harrison, B. L. Hargrave, L. D. Holt, James R. Jones, L. E. Jordan, William E. Lamb, J. W. T.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
Maryland campaign. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 16, 1897] The Cavalry fight at Boonsboro'graphically described. The Ninth Virginia and Eighth Illinois regiments Cross Sabres—the former suffer severely, but capture some prisoners. During the campaign in Maryland in 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry was attached to the brigade commanded by General Fitz Lee. After nine days spent among the fine hay and rich yellow cornfields of Montgomery and Frederick counties, the regiment crossed the Catoctin mountain at Hamburg, at dawn on the morning of September 14th. Hamburg was a rude and scattering village on the crest of the mountain, where the manufacture of brandy seemed to be the chief employment of the villagers, and at the early hour of our passage through the place, both the men and women gave proof that they were free imbibers of the product of their stills, and it was not easy to find a sober inhabitant of either sex. To our troopers, descending the weste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
Retreat from Richmond. [from the Richmond, Va.,, Dispatch, June. 3, 1897–Jan. 18, 1898.] The artillery Brigade. Its heroic conduct at Sailor's Creek—Additional details. (see ante, pp. 38, 134, 139.) Richmond, Va., May 31, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch. Since writing my reminiscences of the retreat from Richmond, Sailor's Creek, etc., which appeared in your Confederate column on 2d of May, I have visited my old comrade, Captain Shirley Harrison, at Brandon. While thereRichmond, Va., May 31, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch. Since writing my reminiscences of the retreat from Richmond, Sailor's Creek, etc., which appeared in your Confederate column on 2d of May, I have visited my old comrade, Captain Shirley Harrison, at Brandon. While there, he spoke in the highest terms of the gallantry of his first lieutenant, J. M. Green (Company D, 10th Virginia Battalion of Artillery), and especially of the nerve and coolness displayed by him in a memorable night attack, while we were on the retreat. He explained how Lieutenant Green had been separated from his command, which accounted for his absence at Sailor's Creek, I noticed in your issue of yesterday a note from Lieutenant Green (now of New York), calling attention to the omission of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
Fayette artillery. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 28, 1897.] The movement on New Berne Thirty-three years ago. A Richmond Battery's part. Both land and naval Forces—a singular charge and a singular Chase— a quick surrender. Richmond, Va., March 23, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Enclosed find an article on the movement to New Berne, N. C., by Pickett, in 1864. Much has been said about this movement, but very little credit given some of the Richmond men engRichmond, Va., March 23, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Enclosed find an article on the movement to New Berne, N. C., by Pickett, in 1864. Much has been said about this movement, but very little credit given some of the Richmond men engaged. Yours, etc., E. W. Gaines. The movement. Thirty-three years ago the Confederate government conceived the idea of capturing New Berne, N. C., the movement being proposed by General George E. Pickett, who was at that time in command of the Department of North Carolina. As to why the movement was entertained, and what was to be gained, many opinions have been expressed by soldiers who were on the outside, rather than the inside, of councils held by their superior officers. It
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., times, January 23, 1898.] Incidents in the remarkable career of the great soldier. by General Dabney H. Maury. He made a poor impression when he first arrived at West Point—a second in a Duel—he obeyed orders at great cost. Men will never cease to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than with any other great soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the Unite
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
cut off, and money, too. They had a hard time of it, but they stood nobly by the cause to the end. We had great times in the first years of the war, when our cause seemed so sure of success and our boys were fighting so bravely, but towards the end Mr. Stephens and Mr. Garland, General Sparrow and Mr. Semmes used to come home with weary hearts. But you were always bright and cheerful to the end, said Mr. Semmes. It was wonderful, the courage of the Southern women during the war. In Richmond, where at all hours, day or night, you could hear the roaring of the cannons and the echo of shot and shell, where bullets were often flying in the streets, the women kept up their social life. Parties and receptions and dinners were given night after night; when our boys in gray passed through the capital, all the women went out to greet them, waving handkerchiefs and bidding them Godspeed. Receptions were given in their honor, and a perpetual round of gayety was kept up. The women did
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. A Tribute to the memory of the gallant and accomplished soldier. An Ode by him. A monument proposed to be erected over his remains in Hollywood. Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. For years as he lay helpless on a bed of physical anguish, which was only partially alleviated by opiates, the fortitude with which the accomplished gentleman and gallant soldier bore his constant suffering, was as pathetic as his gallantry in the field had been ime performed in his bedroom. In May, 1894, he was removed on account of his physical disability. Thrown again upon the world absolutely penniless, his spirit was bright as ever. He never murmured. Then the Confederate Soldiers' Home at Richmond, Virginia, threw wide its doors. His veteran comrades opened their arms and hearts, and said: Come to us beloved and honored friend, and be our guest. And there, with the light of love, friendship, and admiration shining all about him, he passed th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
General Lee's Birthday. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, Jan. 20, 1898 ] The anniversary very generally observed in Richmond. Light of the Camp fire of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. Many Veterans gather in its genial Glow—Captain R. S. Parks delivers a splendid Oration—Howitzers salute the monument. The anniversary Association, of Washington, D. C., was read and received with applause: Washington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The Confederate Veterans' Association of Washington assembled to honor the name of our great leader, General R. E. Lee, send loving greetings to their comrr with them a vow to keep green his memory. Robert I. Fleming, President. Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton was instructed to telegraph the following reply: Richmond, Va., January 19, 1898. Colonel Robert I. Fleming, President Confederate Veterans' Association, Washington, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciproc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
Imprisoned under fire. [from the Richmond, Va., times, August 22, 1897.] Six hundred gallant Confederate officers on Morris Island, S. C., in reach of Confederate guns. They were held in retaliation, and two of them relate the experiences of prison Life—Stories of Captain F. C. Barnes and Captain R. E. Frayser. A list of the officers under fire, as above, including those as well from Maryland, North Carolina, Texas, Mississippi, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucko Virginia before the close of the war, and doubtless they are all now dead. Colonel Woolfolk, Orange county, Va., ranking officer of the Virginians. Major Evan Rice, Tappahannock, Va. Captain Chalkley, Chesterfield county, Va. Captain Fitzgerald, Norfolk, Va. Captain Haskins, Northern Valley of Virginia. First Lieutenant Charles R. Darracott, Sturdevant's Battery, Richmond, Va. Midshipman Leftwich, Lynchburg, Va. Respectfully, George Hopkins. Glen Allen, Va., August 27, 1897
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