Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Richmond (Virginia, United States) or search for Richmond (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
en our gunboats will be free to operate on the James and York Rivers, taking the enemy's works in fo-day we hear his gunboats have gone up the James River, and we now look forward to his beating theing in the direction of Fort Darling on the James River, and we presume the gunboats are engaging tarmy and trains at some secure point on the James River. He had succeeded by dark of the 29th in sn known to lead from White Oak Swamp to the James River, as it was along this road that the trains by the fire of one of the gun-boats in the James River, effectually scattered a column of the enemn during the night of the whole army on the James River, that saved it. And General Fitz-John Portat night to concentrate on the banks of the James River, which they never would have or could have om taking the wrong line of operations, the James River being the true and only practicable line ofe, without some diversion being made on the James River in our favor. What will be done next I can[6 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
re is no probability of their permitting me to go to the James River, as it uncovers Washington. Headquarters army of the amin F. Butler, commanding the Army of the James. on the James River. He reports having executed his orders, and it is said battle with Sheridan. Battle of Yellow Tavern, near Richmond, Va., May 11, 1864. Letter and despatch mentioned in laces, was a failure. By a movement to the north bank of the James, Lee was completely deceived, and thinking it was a movemenle that had been, contrary to my judgment, sent down the James River for grazing, to a point just inside our cavalry pickets,eal of ice in the Chesapeake Bay and considerable in the James River; but to-day has been so mild and pleasant I think the ics up, I shall be able to spend a little time at home. Richmond, Va., May 3, 1865. I arrived here about 11 A. M. to-day, ll then have an opportunity of being home for awhile. Richmond, Va., May 5, 1865. It was intended we should march throug
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 24 (search)
ioned in letter of October 23, 1864. see page 236, Vol. II (New York independent, October 13, 1864) The War in Virginia The military news of the week covers a wide field. Dispatches of considerable interest have been received from the James River, from the Shenandoah Valley, from Georgia, from Kentucky, and from Missouri. The operations in all quarters are important, but the public attention, as usual, is concentrated upon Virginia, and the movements near Richmond have again attractedhis army longed to convert into triumph; who, in the campaign from the Rapidan to the James under Grant, annulled the genius of his chief by his own executive incapacity; who lost the prize of Petersburg by martinet delay on the south bank of the James; who lost it again in succeeding contests by tactical incompetence; who lost it again by inconceivable follies of military administration when the mine was exploded; who insulted his corps commanders and his army by attributing to them that inabi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 27 (search)
and in this the engineers of the army concur—was not considered by Major General Meade a proper one, it being commanded from both flanks and reverse, the continuance of the work was sanctioned. It was not the intention of the Lieutenant General Commanding, or of the Major General commanding the Army of the Potomac, it is believed, to use the mine in the operations against Petersburgh, until it became known that the enemy had withdrawn a large part of his forces to the north side of the James River, when it was thought advantage might be taken of it as an assault. All the Union troops sent north of the James had been recalled in time to participate in the assault, so that the whole of the forces operating in front of Petersburgh were disposable. The mine was ordered to be exploded at 3.30 A. M., but owing to a defective fuse, it did not take place till 4.45. The detailed order or plan of operations issued by Major General Meade is in accordance with General Grant's instructio
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
hout having any accurate knowledge of the point at which he would strike; and it would be evident to any one perusing it, it having been sent simultaneously with the circular, that I was calling upon my corps commanders to give me information which would justify me in fighting at Emmettsburg, Gettysburg, or any other point where the enemy might suitably be met. The next despatch I propose to read was a despatch to the commanding officer of the 6th corps, who was to my right and rear, at Manchester. Between the despatch marked F, just read, and the one I now propose to read, marked G, I had received a despatch from General Buford which indicated a strong concentration of the enemy at Gettysburg. Hence this order to the commander of the 6th corps, the most remote from me, to move up to Gettysburg, should such be decided upon as the most commanding position to be adopted. [The paper marked G was then read.] This despatch was to notify General Sedgwick that there was every probabilit