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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
perations on the main line and not specifically marked out in the original plan, attained in its brilliant execution and results all the proportions of an independent campaign. On the 8th of May, just after the battle of the Wilderness, and when we were moving on Spotsylvania, I directed Sheridan, verbally, to cut loose from the Army of the Potomac, pass around the left of Lee's army and attack his cavalry; to cut the two roads-one running west through Gordonsville, Charlottesville, and Lynchburg, the other to Richmond; and, when compelled to do so for want of forage and rations, to move on to the James River and draw these from Butler's supplies. This move took him past the entire rear of Lee's army. These orders were also given in writing through Meade. The object of this move was threefold: 1. If successfully executed — and it was — he would annoy the enemy by cutting his lines of supplies and telegraphic communications, and destroy or get for his own use supplies in store
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
or-General H. W. Halleck. Jericho Ford, Va., May 25th, 1864. If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchburg, he should do so, living on the country. The railroads and canal should be destroyed beyond possibility of repairs for the 8th of the same month he formed a junction with Crook and Averell at Staunton, from which place he moved direct on Lynchburg, via Lexington, which place [Lynchburg] he reached and invested on the 16th day of June. Up to this time he was very sTo meet this movement under General Hunter, General Lee sent a force, perhaps equal to a corps, a part of which reached Lynchburg a short time before Hunter. After some skirmishing on the 17th and 18th, General Hunter, owing to a want of ammunitionit did not, he would have been within easy distance of the James River canal, on the main line of communication between Lynchburg and the force sent for its defense. I have never taken exception to the operations of General Hunter, and am not now d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
lement in Grant's purposes. To this end, on the 26th of May, Hunter was directed to move down the Shenandoah Valley to Lynchburg, cut the canal, and return over the Lynchburg branch of the Virginia Central to Charlottesville, where it was expected From prisoners Sheridan learned that Hunter, instead of coming toward Charlottesville, was near Lexington, moving upon Lynchburg; that Ewell's corps was on its way to Lynchburg; and that Map of the battle of Trevilian Station. For Sheridan's roLynchburg; and that Map of the battle of Trevilian Station. For Sheridan's route during the raid, see map, P. 190. Breckinridge was at Gordonsville. This information was false. It is now known that Breckinridge had moved on Lynchburg.--T. F. R. He concluded, therefore, to return. During the night of the 12th the coLynchburg.--T. F. R. He concluded, therefore, to return. During the night of the 12th the command moved back, recrossed the North Anna at Carpenter's Ford, unsaddled the horses and turned them out to graze; the poor animals had been without food for two days. The enemy came in sight but once during the entire march to West Point on the Yor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
e of attack. In the progress of these movements, while the splendid infantry and artillery of these two armies were struggling for the mastery around the Confederate capital, Hunter was moving up the valley at the head of a strong force toward Lynchburg to strike at the rear of Richmond. On the 5th of June Grant detached two divisions of his cavalry under Sheridan toward Gordonsville to destroy the railroad communications between Richmond and Gordonsville and Lynchburg, and possibly to form aLynchburg, and possibly to form a junction with Hunter. My brigade consisted of the 4th, 5th, and 6th South Carolina Cavalry, then recently transferred from the sea-coast of South Carolina, where they had seen little active service in the field; and this, with Young's and Rosser's brigades, constituted Hampton's division. On the evening of the 8th of June we were encamped not far from Atlee's Station, on the then Virginia Central Railroad. I received orders late in the day from division headquarters to have my command in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
und him thoroughly protected with intrenchments. On the 12th General Hampton met Sheridan at Trevilian and turned him back from his march to the James River and Lynchburg. General Grant lay in his lines until the night of June 12th. On that night he moved rapidly across the peninsula. The overland campaign north of the James he base of the salient against Hancock and Wright and Warren. Besides this, Lee had already detached Breckinridge's division and Early's corps to meet Hunter at Lynchburg. And, after all, the result showed that Lee's reliance on his men to hold in check attacking forces greatly superior in numbers did not fail him in this instancharacteristic of his military genius. The campaign of 1864 now became the siege of Petersburg. On the night of June 18th Hunter retreated rapidly from before Lynchburg toward western Virginia, and Early, after a brief pursuit, marched into Maryland, and on July 11th his advance was before the outer defenses of Washington. Bel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
and that of Sigel at Winchester, who was expected to march up the Valley of Virginia, pick up his detachments from the Kanawha (Crook and Averell), and threaten Lynchburg, a place of vital importance to Lee in Richmond. Butler failed to accomplish what was expected of him; and Sigel failed at the very start, and was replaced by Hunter, who marched up the valley, made junction with Crook and Averell at Staunton, and pushed, on with commendable vigor to Lynchburg, which he invested on the 16th of June. Lee, who had by this time been driven into Richmond with a force large enough to hold his lines of intrenchment and a surplus for expeditions, detached General Jubal A. Early with the equivalent of a corps to drive Hunter away from Lynchburg. Hunter, far from his base, with inadequate supplies of food and ammunition, retreated by the Kanawha to the Ohio River, his nearest base, thereby exposing the Valley of Virginia; whereupon Early, an educated soldier, promptly resolved to take a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
Mounted Rifles, in command of a small brigade of Confederate cavalry, was sent into Kentucky Map of operations against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, Lynchburg, Va., to Knoxville, Tenn. from the Department of South-western Virginia to secure forage and cover other military movements. Colonel Clay first advanced upon Paied General Thomas, commanding the Department of the Cumberland, to direct General Stoneman to repeat the raid of last fall, destroying the railroad as far toward Lynchburg as he can. Stoneman set out from Knoxville about the 20th of March, and moved, via Morristown and Bull's Gap, across Iron Mountain to Boone, North Carolina. Stnd crossed the Blue Ridge to Wilkesboro‘, and then turned toward south-western Virginia, destroying the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad from Wytheville nearly to Lynchburg. On the 9th of April Stoneman moved again into North Carolina, via Jacksonville, Taylorsville, and Germantown. At Germantown the force divided, Palmer's brigad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
e Virginia and Tennessee Railroad sixty odd miles west of Lynchburg, and destroyed the army stores accumulated there, and theral William E. Jones, then in south-west Virginia, beyond Lynchburg, to come to my aid with all the men he could collect fromssee. Jones responded promptly that he would join me via Lynchburg and Staunton by the 4th with about three thousand men. g the line of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad west of Lynchburg. My staff and I were up nearly all night organizing thesp, thus interposing a barrier to Hunter's direct march on Lynchburg. Hunter decided to push his column forty or fifty miles Breckinridge moved all the rest of his troops directly to Lynchburg to defend the place. Hunter threw a brigade of cavalry a, no collision occurred between us. Our rapid movement on Lynchburg doubtless saved it from capture by this cavalry force, asell back to the Quaker meeting House, four miles out from Lynchburg on the Salem or Liberty turnpike, upon which the enemy wa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
iately assemble 8000 infantry, 1500 cavalry ( picked men ), besides artillery, provided with. ten days rations, at Beverly, for the purpose of marching by Covington to Staunton; the troops to be under the command of General Ord, who supplemented the letter by saying, on the authority of General Grant, that the column should. start within ten days. General Crook was to move from Charleston against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, destroy as much of it as possible, and then turn toward Lynchburg or await further orders. Crook had been summoned to Grant's headquarters about a week before, where this raid had been discussed and decided upon. In another letter I was directed to have a large train ready and to move up the Valley and meet the expedition of Ord and Crook as soon as it should reach Staunton. The most energetic measures were immediately taken to put this plan into operation. All the troops that could be spared were concentrated at Webster and Clarksburg to move to Bev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Lynchburg expedition. (search)
,----; 1st N. Y. (Veteran),----; 21st N. Y.,----; 1st Md., P. H. B.,----. Second Brigade, Col. John E. Wynkoop: 15th N. Y.,----; 20th Pa.,----; 22d Pa.,----. Second cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. William W. Averell. First Brigade, Col. James N. Schoonmaker: 8th Ohio, Col. Alpheus S. Moore; 14th Pa.,----. Second Brigade, Col. John H. Oley: 34th Ohio (mounted infantry),----; 3d W. Va.,----; 5th W. Va.,----; 7th W. Va.,----. Third Brigade, Col. William H. Powell: 1st W. Va.,----; 2d W. Va.,----. Hunter started on this expedition with about 8500 men of all arms. After uniting with Crook and Averell at Staunton his force was about 18,000 strong. The Confederate Army. The forces resisting Hunter's advance were commanded by Generals W. E. Jones (killed at Piedmont), J. C. Vaughn, John McCausland, W. L. Jackson, and J. D. Imboden. General John C. Breckinridge's division and Jubal A. Early's corps arrived at Lynchburg in time to defend the place against Hunter's meditated attack.
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